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Chamber Music - Released December 13, 2019 | Signum Classics

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Classical - Released March 30, 2018 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - Released December 13, 2019 | Signum Classics

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Classical - Released September 27, 2019 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - Released June 26, 2020 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released September 27, 2019 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released August 25, 2014 | Signum Records

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Llyr Williams' double CD on Signum Classics is titled Wagner Without Words, but that familiar phrase usually implies orchestral arrangements of operatic excerpts without singing, along the lines of Lorin Maazel's The Ring Without Words, or Henk de Vlieger's symphonic syntheses. Instead, this collection consists of piano transcriptions of music from the operas, as well as several of Wagner's original piano pieces, so a more accurate title would have been Wagner at the Piano. Williams provides some well-known crowd-pleasers, among them the Liszt transcriptions of the Entry of the Guests from Tannhäuser, the Spinning Chorus from The Flying Dutchman, Elsa's Bridal Procession from Lohengrin, the Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde, and a handful more of pieces drawn from Parsifal, Rienzi, Meistersinger, and the Ring, all familiar to Wagnerites. But the most interesting selections are Wagner's piano compositions, including the Fantasy, a Song without Words, the Zürich Waltzes, Sonata for the Book of Mrs. M. W. (Mathilde Wesendonck), and the Albumblatt for Mrs. Betty Schott, all rarities, even on piano collections. These are minor pieces that show a more relaxed and private side of Wagner, and their smaller scale and intimate expressions make a striking contrast with the theatrical music. Williams plays everything with polish and enthusiasm, and while he obviously enjoys the virtuosic showstoppers, he treats the less familiar pieces with special care and sensitivity. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 4, 2016 | Ty Cerdd

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Chamber Music - Released March 27, 2020 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released September 1, 2010 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released June 5, 2014 | Ty Cerdd Records

A bagatelle is a trifle (the literal meaning of the word refers to an early form of pinball), but composers from Beethoven on down have perversely written works that invested the form with great importance. So it is with many of the bagatelles on this little Welsh release, although the early ones by Welsh composer Daniel Jones are pretty thin. Jones achieved considerable renown in the mid-20th century despite being right in the sour spot between atonality and tonality, and he devised a metrical system that influenced Boris Blacher among others. There is not much evidence of that in the bagatelles here, which in the latter two sets seem influenced by Bartók's short pieces and are paired on the album with a set of them. This collection appears on a Welsh label, complete with Welsh and English notes, and a characteristically Welsh quality has been claimed for Jones' music. It's hard to hear (maybe it's a Swansea thing), even in this confident performance by Welsh pianist Llyr Williams, but the final set of seven Jones bagatelles takes a step beyond Bartók both tonally and rhythmically, and offers some terse, beautifully formed utterances. A worthwhile revival of music by a composer who really fit none of the 20th century's trends. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released March 13, 2020 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released December 2, 2016 | Llŷr Williams

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Classical - Released July 31, 2017 | Llŷr Williams

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Quartz Music

In 2006, Welsh pianist Llyr Williams made his first commercial recording for Quartz and opened with the 24 Preludes of Frédéric Chopin. Williams' interpretations of these miniatures are matter-of-fact and concise, and utterly lacking in grand-standing, much as the composer is thought to have played them. If the secret to playing Chopin is a combination of modest, close-to-the-vest expression and light execution, with minimal pedaling and a fairly crisp tone, then Williams appears to have mastered it. This is not to say his sound is always delicate, because he produces a massive volume in the Prelude No. 14 in E flat minor, and offers ample fire in the Prelude No. 24 in D minor. To fill out his program, Williams includes the Nocturne, Op. 48/1, the Ballade, Op. 52, and the Scherzo, Op. 31, which are all substantial works of moderate length and far from routine CD filler. Again, Williams cultivates constrained emotion and renders these pieces with a calculated control that makes the surges of dynamics and energy all the more effective. The audio of the recordings is clean and natural, with the piano carefully miked to optimize the instrument's resonance in a dry acoustic. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released June 5, 2020 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - Released May 6, 2020 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - Released October 8, 2019 | Signum Classics

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Chamber Music - Released February 26, 2020 | Signum Records

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