Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES£16.49
CD£10.99

Secular Vocal Music - Released February 24, 2015 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES£16.49
CD£10.99

Classical - Released March 9, 2018 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Do not confuse the medieval vielle, which is played with a bow, with the vielle à roue, or hurdy-gurdy, whose strings are plucked by a wheel which is turned with a crank. The vielle is one of the older instruments, and it is typical of the Middle Ages. Larger models are similar in size to the modern viola, and it is related to a smaller instrument which would generally become known as a rebec at the end of the 14th century. The broad and generic meaning of the word vielle (or viola, in Occitan) was drawn out by the arrival of more specific terms like gigue (from the German-speaking world), rebebe (from the Arabic rebab) or crwth or rotte (from the Celtic fringe). The vielle is characterised by a flat casing, oval or oblong in shape, sometimes cut fairly low laterally, with a variable number of strings. In other words, there were many different versions of this generic instrument, and on this album we find it in many different shapes, sizes and regional origins. He leaves it to the listener to form their own view of the many different sounds, which vary so widely from each piece to the next; and whose manuscripts vary so widely in terms of their origins: Germany, Italy, Flanders, Occitania, and Celtic regions. The majority of these pieces are anonymous, but we can still identify Perdigon, the Ardechois troubadour from the early 13th century; the Flemish Johannes Ciconia (1370-1412) and the famous Burgundian Guillaume Dufay, who needs no introduction. The Miroir de Musique ensemble, led by Baptiste Romain, specialises in the music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance; their members sing and play many different forms of vielle, harp, percussion instruments and the bagpipes! © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES£16.49
CD£10.99

Classical - Released February 26, 2016 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
From
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released May 21, 2021 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
Born in Leuze (Hainaut) around 1430, Johannes Martini was initially active in Konstanz, then in Milan and Ferrara, where he died on 23 October 1497. Closely connected with the d’Este family, he was paid in 1479 for the production of a large volume of vocal music for the ducal chapel of Ferrara. He is also the key contributor to the Casanatense Chansonnier, which was compiled for the marriage of Isabella d’Este to Gianfrancesco II Gonzaga in 1490. Thanks to these collections, we can for the first time present a glimpse of the immense output (motets, psalms, mass movements, chansons, instrumental chansons) of one of the most refined composers of the generation before Josquin’s. &copty; Ricercar
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£9.99

Classical - Released June 23, 2017 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
If Johannes Tinctoris (1435-1511) is today widely recognised as one of the most renowned music theorists of his time, he was also a perceptive observer of the musical practices of the Renaissance. After studying in Orléans, he held several positions in Cambrai, Liège and finally Naples. Here his gifts as a composer could flourish at the court of King Ferrante of Aragon as a chaplain, legal advisor and music tutor of Ferrante’s daughter Beatrice. This programme retraces his career through his extremely varied output: French and Italian songs, Mass movements, and instrumental pieces. © Arcana/Outhere
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released May 21, 2021 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
Born in Leuze (Hainaut) around 1430, Johannes Martini was initially active in Konstanz, then in Milan and Ferrara, where he died on 23 October 1497. Closely connected with the d’Este family, he was paid in 1479 for the production of a large volume of vocal music for the ducal chapel of Ferrara. He is also the key contributor to the Casanatense Chansonnier, which was compiled for the marriage of Isabella d’Este to Gianfrancesco II Gonzaga in 1490. Thanks to these collections, we can for the first time present a glimpse of the immense output (motets, psalms, mass movements, chansons, instrumental chansons) of one of the most refined composers of the generation before Josquin’s. &copty; Ricercar
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released March 12, 2013 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released June 23, 2017 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
If Johannes Tinctoris (1435-1511) is today widely recognised as one of the most renowned music theorists of his time, he was also a perceptive observer of the musical practices of the Renaissance. After studying in Orléans, he held several positions in Cambrai, Liège and finally Naples. Here his gifts as a composer could flourish at the court of King Ferrante of Aragon as a chaplain, legal advisor and music tutor of Ferrante’s daughter Beatrice. This programme retraces his career through his extremely varied output: French and Italian songs, Mass movements, and instrumental pieces. © Arcana/Outhere
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released June 7, 2019 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released February 24, 2015 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released March 9, 2018 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet
Do not confuse the medieval vielle, which is played with a bow, with the vielle à roue, or hurdy-gurdy, whose strings are plucked by a wheel which is turned with a crank. The vielle is one of the older instruments, and it is typical of the Middle Ages. Larger models are similar in size to the modern viola, and it is related to a smaller instrument which would generally become known as a rebec at the end of the 14th century. The broad and generic meaning of the word vielle (or viola, in Occitan) was drawn out by the arrival of more specific terms like gigue (from the German-speaking world), rebebe (from the Arabic rebab) or crwth or rotte (from the Celtic fringe). The vielle is characterised by a flat casing, oval or oblong in shape, sometimes cut fairly low laterally, with a variable number of strings. In other words, there were many different versions of this generic instrument, and on this album we find it in many different shapes, sizes and regional origins. He leaves it to the listener to form their own view of the many different sounds, which vary so widely from each piece to the next; and whose manuscripts vary so widely in terms of their origins: Germany, Italy, Flanders, Occitania, and Celtic regions. The majority of these pieces are anonymous, but we can still identify Perdigon, the Ardechois troubadour from the early 13th century; the Flemish Johannes Ciconia (1370-1412) and the famous Burgundian Guillaume Dufay, who needs no introduction. The Miroir de Musique ensemble, led by Baptiste Romain, specialises in the music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance; their members sing and play many different forms of vielle, harp, percussion instruments and the bagpipes! © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£12.59

Classical - Released February 26, 2016 | Ricercar

Hi-Res Booklet