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Classical - Released October 19, 2012 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
The Chopin Album is Lang Lang's first recording for Sony devoted entirely to the solo piano music of the Romantic master, focused on the Études, Op. 25, with three of the most popular Nocturnes and a handful of other pieces included for good measure. While Lang Lang's phenomenal popularity guarantees this CD's success, and his ability to play the technically demanding Études will impress his fans, devotees of Chopin's music may be skeptical of the pianist's interpretations, which at their best are flashy and extroverted. While it's not necessary to play Chopin close to the vest, with the expressive reticence of a wallflower, Lang Lang is no introvert, and it shows in the pieces where sensitivity and poetic refinement are desirable. He plays with his customary bravado in the loudest Études, the Grande Valse Brillante, the Grande Polonaise, and even in the inaccurately nicknamed "Minute" Waltz, but his expression at softer levels seems affectless, uninvolved, and rather uninteresting. While connoisseurs may balk at this fairly showy album, it is sure to appeal to a wide audience, perhaps most especially because of the inclusion of Lang Lang's duet with Danish singer Oh Land, "Tristesse," which is based on Chopin's Étude in E major, Op. 10/3, and taken from the soundtrack for the film The Flying Machine. Sony's sound is generally good, though Lang Lang's dynamic range is wide enough to make setting the volume a little tricky.
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Classical - Released August 22, 2011 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Franz Liszt's birth, virtuoso pianist Lang Lang has selected some of the composer's most characteristic pieces for his 2011 Sony release, Liszt: My Piano Hero. Prominent on this album is the Piano Concerto No. 1 in E flat major, which features Lang Lang in a high-energy performance with Valery Gergiev and the Vienna Philharmonic. Without a doubt, most of Lang Lang's fans will savor this Romantic showpiece, and for technical brilliance and drama, the performance doesn't disappoint. He is especially lively and vivid in this work, and his interactions with the orchestra seem spontaneous and playful, as one might well imagine Liszt would have been. But Lang Lang seems more introspective and personally involved with the solo keyboard pieces that make up the greater part of the album. Here also is the flashy side of Liszt, but there is a greater emphasis on the poetic and rhapsodic, so Lang Lang indulges in reflective pieces as much as the flashy encores. Highlights include La Campanella, the Grand Galop chromatique, Liebestraum No. 3, the Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6, and the arrangement of Schubert's Ave Maria.
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Classical - Released October 9, 2015 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
For all the crossover theatrics he has offered as he approaches the end of the second decade of his career, the Chinese phenomenon Lang Lang would not have continued to flourish without solid and even innovative performances of core classical repertory. Following up on his highly successful Chopin Album, Lang Lang scores again with this recording, put together over several nights at the Bastille Opera in Paris. The first part consists of the four Chopin Scherzos, and these play unmistakably to Lang Lang's athletic strengths. Consider the octave triplet passages that make up the main thematic material of the Scherzo No. 3 in C sharp minor, Op. 39. In Lang Lang's hands, these are not just muscular, but a breathtaking single gesture. There aren't many pianists who could carry that off, and better still, Lang Lang molds the gesture into different shapes as the piece proceeds. He has the musicality to carry off risky contrasts between loud and quiet, and in the bravura passages of these most virtuosic Chopin pieces he is simply gripping. Tchaikovsky's The Seasons, Op. 37, are less commonly played than the Chopin, and there are recordings less brittle and more oriented toward the work's French roots than Lang Lang's. But here again there is a remarkable combination of power and suppleness, and it would be hard to conceive of anyone being bored by his performances. Sony's engineering tends to favor the high end, which is already implicit in Lang Lang's playing and did not need any help, but this does not distort his work in this case. Highly recommended for those who loved the Chopin Album, and evidence of continuing worthwhile work from one of the world's most popular classical artists.
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Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Piano Book is a compilation of post-Bach piano music’s greatest hits. Lang Lang puts together a retrospective anthology beginning with J.S. Bach’s Prelude in C major from the first book of the Well-Tempered Clavier. The piece, in fully written arpeggio, which every piano student has studied to practice fingering, articulations, and harmonic tiering is followed by Beethoven’s Lettre à Elise. Lang Lang then invites Mendelssohn (La Fileuse), Chopin (15th Prelude from Opus 28), and Mozart (Allegro from Sonata "Semplice" or Variations on "Ah, vous dirai-je Maman") The record also includes lesser-known repertoire from such composers as Badarzewska-Baranowska, Czerny, or Clementi and a few Chinese classic and traditional / popular songs from diverse parts of the world.Lang Lang has fun, especially when he plays French music. Performing Debussy’s Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum, he enjoys each afterbeat, plays with the basses, and even sings. © Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Piano Book is a compilation of post-Bach piano music’s greatest hits. Lang Lang puts together a retrospective anthology beginning with J.S. Bach’s Prelude in C major from the first book of the Well-Tempered Clavier. The piece, in fully written arpeggio, which every piano student has studied to practice fingering, articulations, and harmonic tiering is followed by Beethoven’s Lettre à Elise. Lang Lang then invites Mendelssohn (La Fileuse), Chopin (15th Prelude from Opus 28), and Mozart (Allegro from Sonata "Semplice" or Variations on "Ah, vous dirai-je Maman") The record also includes lesser-known repertoire from such composers as Badarzewska-Baranowska, Czerny, or Clementi and a few Chinese classic and traditional / popular songs from diverse parts of the world.Lang Lang has fun, especially when he plays French music. Performing Debussy’s Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum, he enjoys each afterbeat, plays with the basses, and even sings. © Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released November 29, 2019 | Sony Classical

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International stardom has made Lang Lang into an ambassador for the classical repertoire. Sony has chosen Beethoven's 250th birthday to release a compilation that was born of a live concert recorded in Vienna, a city which has seen the birth of so many of the composer's works. The collection takes in Sonata No.3 and No.23, also known as Appassionata. These scores are an imaginary battlefield pitting the writer's contending passions against one another. Beethoven, subject to a compulsive inspiration, uses his writing to guide, even contain, this irresistible force: the greatest liberty dammed up by reason, an apparent paradox which his art summarises well. But here Lang Lang gives us an almost fantastical Beethoven. The pianist has fun with a repertoire which exacerbates contrasts thanks to an immense palette of nuances and several liberties taken with the tempos. Although his level of technique permits him such extravagances, it must be said that he is much more conventional with Beethoven than he is with Rachmaninov. You don't fool around with the Master of Bonn. The record closes on a studio version of the first movement of Sonata No.17 (the famous Tempest), recorded for the video game Gran Turismo 5. The rather grandiloquent switch between its Largo and Allegro sections makes its mark on the text. Lang Lang serves up a very literally visual interpretation of this score, built around the most epic settings that these Beethovian storms permit. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 13, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released September 28, 2018 | Sony Classical

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"Lang Lang – Piano Magic" is a compilation of a wide variety of recordings made between 2010 and 2014; the album brings together short pieces, and also some of the most popular isolated movements in piano music – which are often played as encores. In a few minutes, each of these morsels conjures up its own miniature universe, as if by magic... Hence the title. While the majority of pieces are brilliantly virtuoso, our pianist doesn't forget to include a few rather less complex moments, which put the emphasis more on softness and solemnity. The magnificent Entertainer by Scott Joplin which closes the album, is played with an offbeat wit and a very personalised idea of rhythm with a few melodic turns which Lang Lang puts a jazzy spin on, as if re-improvising the whole thing on the spot. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 14, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
How bad is it? Right from the colossal chords that open Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2, it's bad. Lang Lang starts slow and gets slower until he nearly stops the music, destroying the rhythmic intensity and the harmonic tension. When Valery Gergiev brings in the Orchestra of the Marinsky Theatre, the tempo snaps into place for the first theme and Gergiev holds the music at tempo until the second theme. Then, once again, Lang starts slow and gets slower until he's nearly stopped the music, destroying the lyrical line and the momentum. When Gergiev brings the Orchestra back in, the tempo snaps back into place for the development and Gergiev keeps the music at tempo until the cadenza. Then, once again, Lang starts slow and gets slower until he's nearly stopped the music, destroying the formal drama and the structural integrity. And so it goes for the rest of the Concerto, with Gergiev holding to the tempo and Lang slowing to a stop until the music is ultimately tattered and torn between them. It's not that Lang lacks the technique. The billions of notes of Rachmaninov's Paganini Rhapsody are in place. It's not that Lang lacks the tone. The depth of sound of the Andante Cantabile Variation is enormous. It's that Lang lacks the taste and temperament. His playing is self-amused and self-indulgent. He's so enraptured by his own playing that he starts slow to show off and he gets slower to admire his own performance. It's narcissism as an interpretive strategy. Deutsche Grammophon is dark and hooded.
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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 17, 2014 | Sony Classical

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For this all-Mozart twofer from Sony, piano virtuoso Lang Lang, conductor Nikolaus Harnoncourt, and the Vienna Philharmonic present a program of piano concertos, piano sonatas, and several short solo pieces that give a good sampling of the composer's keyboard output. The roster may provoke some cognitive dissonance, though, because Harnoncourt is best known for historically informed period interpretations of Mozart, while Lang Lang and the Vienna Philharmonic are more associated with a conventional, mainstream performance style. One might expect some compromise between the two camps, yet while the orchestra incorporates some aspects of Classical sound into its playing, it remains a modern orchestra of full size, and Harnoncourt doesn't ask for the tone colors and techniques he would demand of his own Concentus Musicus Wien. For the soloist's part, Lang Lang is rather restrained and sensitive to the character of the music, and apart from some showiness in his cadenzas, he shows less of the ebullience and bravura playing he otherwise shows in Liszt or Rachmaninov. The section of the program devoted to solo piano works is less of a stylistic challenge, but Lang Lang's mannered playing is a matter of taste, and listeners who like a fairly Romantic interpretation will like his approach. Others, however, will already know Lang Lang's readings are not historically informed performances and avoid them.
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Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Piano Book is a compilation of post-Bach piano music’s greatest hits. Lang Lang puts together a retrospective anthology beginning with J.S. Bach’s Prelude in C major from the first book of the Well-Tempered Clavier. The piece, in fully written arpeggio, which every piano student has studied to practice fingering, articulations, and harmonic tiering is followed by Beethoven’s Lettre à Elise. Lang Lang then invites Mendelssohn (La Fileuse), Chopin (15th Prelude from Opus 28), and Mozart (Allegro from Sonata "Semplice" or Variations on "Ah, vous dirai-je Maman") The record also includes lesser-known repertoire from such composers as Badarzewska-Baranowska, Czerny, or Clementi and a few Chinese classic and traditional / popular songs from diverse parts of the world.Lang Lang has fun, especially when he plays French music. Performing Debussy’s Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum, he enjoys each afterbeat, plays with the basses, and even sings. © Qobuz
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Video Games - Released November 26, 2010 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released September 16, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released November 4, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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On November 7, 2003, Lang Lang gave his debut recital at Carnegie Hall to great public excitement, but also to mixed critical reception. Some reviewers criticized Lang for his distracting mannerisms and his grandstanding. But this double-disc is unsatisfying on purely musical grounds, for Lang's interpretations are uneven, callow, and often heavy-handed. Either Lang was out of sorts that evening, or else he deliberately distorted his playing to favor bombast over genuine expression and refinement. On the positive side, Haydn's Sonata and Tan Dun's Eight Memories in Watercolor are most engaging, and feature the subtlest playing on the album. But Lang's performances of Schumann's Abegg Variations and Chopin's Nocturne are perfunctory and uncompelling, as if Lang's heart was not in them. Worse still, his renditions of Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy and Liszt's Reminiscences of Don Giovanni are ham-fisted and noisy affairs -- the former due to insensitivity and the latter out of unabashed vulgarity. For light encores of little consequence, Lang played Schumann's Träumerei; the Competition of the Two Horses, with his father, Guo-ren Lang, performing on the voice-like erhu; and Liszt's hackneyed Liebesträume. Considering Lang's erratic performance and the recording's fluctuating volume levels, this album will be a serious disappointment for all but Lang's most devoted fans.
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Classical - Released January 15, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2006 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 4, 2013 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released July 22, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Lang Lang in the magazine