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Film Soundtracks - Released October 27, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 15, 2010 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Verve

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 1, 2019 | RevOla

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 27, 2006 | Aleph Records

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Jazz - Released February 1, 1993 | EastWest Germany

On this third-stream effort, pianist/composer Lalo Schifrin, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Grady Tate swing while joined by the London Philharmonic. Most intriguing among Schifrin's arrangements are "Echoes of Duke Ellington" and "Dizzy Gillespie Fireworks," which are really medleys of Duke's and Dizzy's songs. Not all of the shorter pieces (particularly "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and "As Time Goes By") are too essential, and, on the whole, Schifrin's follow-up project (More Jazz Meets the Symphony) would result in a stronger record. However, this generally interesting set is still worth exploring; it was good to hear Lalo Schifrin in a jazz setting again. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1969 | Geffen

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 15, 2007 | Aleph Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1996 | Geffen*

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1967 | Geffen

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released January 1, 1976 | Legacy - Epic Associated

Although he is best-known for film scores like Bullitt and Enter The Dragon, prolific composer Lalo Schifrin has always maintained a side career as a jazz musician. He racked up a massive success in this field in 1976 with Black Widow, a slick instrumental excursion that combined the musical dexterity of jazz with the dance-friendly rhythms of disco. This album found Schifrin turning his skills as an arranger and keyboardist to a set of material that matched up some unlikely but effective covers with a few originals. Highlights among the covers include "Quiet Village," which transforms the exotica classic into a slow-burning funk vamp dressed with plenty of spacey synthesizer, and "Moonglow & Theme From Picnic," which reworks these classic film themes by giving them keyboard-driven arrangements that are gently nudged along by an insistent beat. Black Widow also spawned a dancefloor hit with Schifrin's imaginative reworking of "Jaws," which transformed John Williams' spooky monster-movie theme into an ominous, percolating slice of nocturnal funk built on wah-wah guitar and Schifrin's elegantly jazzy keyboard excursions. In terms of the original tunes, the standout is the title track, a keyboard showcase that weaves surging strings around a funky bass groove that is fleshed out with all manner of synth and electric piano shadings. The strong disco edge to the proceedings may turn off jazz purists, but Schifrin's imaginative and stylish arrangements keep the music from succumbing to disco-beat boredom, and his expert backup band (including session stalwarts like Andy Newmark and John Tropea) attacks the material with energy and style to burn. The end result is one of the peak albums in Lalo Schifrin's lengthy catalogue and a necessity for anyone interested in his jazz work. © Donald A. Guarisco /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 11, 2016 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Jazz - Released June 1, 1966 | Verve Reissues

Come again? This crackpot title -- probably the longest ever concocted for a jazz album -- actually is a front for a not-so-dangerous, hard-swinging album in which Schifrin invents or borrows 18th-century classical themes and sets them into big band or small-combo contexts. Such is Schifrin's chameleonic mastery that his own inventions are a match for the themes of the period, and he is tasteful enough not to overload the window dressing and keep the rhythm section loosely swinging nearly all the time. Once, Lalo tries something wacky; on "Beneath a Weeping Window Shade," he has singer Rose Marie Jun intoning a madrigal-like Francis Hopkinson song against some avant-garde multiphonic flute from Jerome Richardson, ministrations from a string quintet, and Schifrin's own comments on harpsichord. There is also a stimulating pastiche "Aria" that sounds like Schifrin arguing with Heitor Villa-Lobos and Henry Purcell in 9/8 time. With the cream of New York's jazz session men of the '60s on board -- including the inimitable Grady Tate on drums, Richardson on flute and tenor, Gene Bertoncini on guitar, and J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding on trombones -- and Creed Taylor's production dictating the distinctive timbres, jazz buffs will have a fine time with this collision of the centuries, which leans heavily to the jazz side. The album was reissued on CD as part of Verve's limited Elite Editions series. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released January 1, 1976 | Epic

Although he is best-known for film scores like Bullitt and Enter The Dragon, prolific composer Lalo Schifrin has always maintained a side career as a jazz musician. He racked up a massive success in this field in 1976 with Black Widow, a slick instrumental excursion that combined the musical dexterity of jazz with the dance-friendly rhythms of disco. This album found Schifrin turning his skills as an arranger and keyboardist to a set of material that matched up some unlikely but effective covers with a few originals. Highlights among the covers include "Quiet Village," which transforms the exotica classic into a slow-burning funk vamp dressed with plenty of spacey synthesizer, and "Moonglow & Theme From Picnic," which reworks these classic film themes by giving them keyboard-driven arrangements that are gently nudged along by an insistent beat. Black Widow also spawned a dancefloor hit with Schifrin's imaginative reworking of "Jaws," which transformed John Williams' spooky monster-movie theme into an ominous, percolating slice of nocturnal funk built on wah-wah guitar and Schifrin's elegantly jazzy keyboard excursions. In terms of the original tunes, the standout is the title track, a keyboard showcase that weaves surging strings around a funky bass groove that is fleshed out with all manner of synth and electric piano shadings. The strong disco edge to the proceedings may turn off jazz purists, but Schifrin's imaginative and stylish arrangements keep the music from succumbing to disco-beat boredom, and his expert backup band (including session stalwarts like Andy Newmark and John Tropea) attacks the material with energy and style to burn. The end result is one of the peak albums in Lalo Schifrin's lengthy catalogue and a necessity for anyone interested in his jazz work. © Donald A. Guarisco /TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 1, 2012 | Stardust Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1969 | Geffen

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 29, 2007 | Aleph Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve

While he’s best known as a composer of music for films and television (the original MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE series), Lalo Schifrin is also a jazz pianist, once in the employ of iconic trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie in the late-1950s and early-‘60s. Released in 1962, BOSSA NOVA finds the Argentina-born Schifrin paying tribute to the Brazilian style with lush, elegant strings and his lyrical piano. There are bossa nova standards, three originals, and some songs by American composers given the romantic bossa treatment. © TiVo
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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released March 21, 1976 | Epic

After scoring an unexpected high-profile success with the disco/jazz fusion of Black Widow, Lalo Schifrin quickly recorded a follow-up album in a similar vein. 1977's Towering Toccata replicates the elegant yet dance-friendly style of Black Widow to the tee, right down to the unconventional cover choices. The best of these is the title track, an insistently rhythmic piece that transforms Bach's gothic-organ extravaganza "Toccata and Prelude in F Minor" into a mid-tempo disco workout that backs up Schifrin's jazzy explorations on the electric piano and synthesizer with scratching rhythm guitar and a pronounced dance beat. Other notable moments on this album include "Most Wanted Theme," which is transformed from action-show theme music into a symphonic funk workout, and "Rollercoaster," a funky vamp from the Schifrin soundtrack of the same name that is ideally suited for Towering Toccata's disco/jazz mindset. There is even another monster-movie theme cover in the vein of the previous album's "Jaws"; this time, it's a disco-friendly treatment of John Barry's "Theme From King Kong" that layers atmospheric horn and flute lines over a bottom-heavy rhythm section fueled by wah-wah guitar and synth bass. However, other tracks on Towering Toccata fail to be as distinctive or adventurous as these highlights. For instance, the original tunes ("Macumba," "Midnight Woman") fit the album's mood but are lacking strong hooks and memorable twists in their arrangements that distinguished the originals on Black Widow. This problem of inconsistent material, combined with the fact that the album is basically a stylistic carbon copy of its predecessor, means that it isn't the ideal follow-up to Black Widow that Schifrin fans might have hoped for. That said, the album has enough strong tunes and enough of a consistent sound to please hardcore Lalo Schifrin fans and anyone who loved Black Widow. © Donald A. Guarisco /TiVo