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Chamber Music - Released February 3, 2017 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Classical - Released February 14, 2020 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released September 3, 2015 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Chamber Music - Released January 11, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released January 12, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Marin Marais, "chamber viola player to the King", and a talented composer is the author of this rich work full of contrasts, which forms the bridge, in the French viola tradition, between the generation of pioneers (with Saint-Colombe at their head) and the generation of the last French viola players (such as Forqueray or Caix d'Hervelois). This selection gives us an insight into the art of Marais - who was recognised in his own time as a technically gifted and brilliant musician - by way of his two Livres de viole, published in 1717 and 1725 respectively. It was in this period, which was both especially artistically fruitful but also unstable and subject to all sorts of political, economic and social turmoil, that Marais brought out his two last works. This album brings together a good number of strikingly original pieces, in particular from the Suite d’un goût étranger, a real introduction to the world of tonalities. The viola responds very differently to different tones: each tonality has its own very particular effect in terms of musical rhetoric: the Paraza in D minor sounds opulent and full, the Badinage in F sharp minor fragile and uncertain. Special mention should also go to a rare and stunning piece called Le Tact, which requires a curious sort of left-handed pizzicato without any help from the right (which he calls "tact", a forerunner of very modern techniques). This is where Marais shows his particular genius, because he loves the instrument's sensitive, vulnerable instrument, which he explores with great poetry. Founded by theorbist Benjamin Perrot and the viola player Florence Bolton, La Rêveuse (taking its name from the final piece of this album) is an ensemble which specialises in the artistic heritage of the 17th and 18th Centuries, periods which are rich in experiences and artistic inventions of all kinds. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released January 12, 2015 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released April 14, 2011 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released May 21, 2010 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre, "presumably" depicted in a contemporary portrait on the cover of this release from France's Mirare label, was a keyboardist and composer in the orbit of, although not directly connected with, the court of Louis XV of France. Her music tends to show up on collections of compositions by women, but this release by the group La Rêveuse, with violinist Stéphan Dudermel in the spotlight, accomplishes more by focusing on a single genre in which Jacquet de la Guerre, it seems, had a major impact on French Baroque music. Composed mostly in the first decade of the 18th century, these violin sonatas and trio sonatas date from 15 years or more before Couperin's grand effort to reunite the French and Italian tastes, and in fact they are among the first stirrings of the Corelli style and Italian High Baroque instrumental music in France. The sonatas consist mostly of Italianate sonata movements with a few French dances thrown in, but what's most attractive is Jacquet de la Guerre's way of manipulating Corelli's liking for sequential constructions to produce an affecting sentimentality; her movement structures are both thematically tight and charming in a very French way. Sample the opening Grave movements of the first two sonatas (tracks 1 and 7). La Rêveuse captures this quality nicely, although it's hampered by icily harsh sound reverberating from the walls of the church where the music was recorded. The entire question of whether music by women is distinctive due to gender is a vexed one, with some of the arguments emanating from academia failing to meet even a standard of verifiability that would be considered acceptable in an astrology clinic. But this pioneering recording provides plenty of food for thought. Notes are in French, German, and English of a sort. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 25, 2013 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 18, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
French Baroque ensemble La Rêveuse's first project for harmonia mundi (having hopped over from Mirare) is a celebration of the London's music scene during the first two decades of the eighteenth century – a time when dwindling royal patronage had sparked off a new cultural economy based on public concerts and the widespread amateur music-making these inspired, establishing the city as an international epicentre for cultural vibrancy and innovation, and thus the obvious destination for any musician wanting to make their fortune. Especially the Italians, off the back of the British mania for Corelli's Opus 6 collection of concerti grossi. Of course, much as that premise has all the potential for a sparkling recording, it's still eminently possible to end up with something sounding no different to any other Baroque concerto programme, so it's a joy to discover that not only does La Rêveuse's offering genuinely fizz, but also that it sounds genuinely distinctive; the former quality being down to their playing's combination of lucid-textured joyous energy and supple technical elegance (plus some wonderfully immediate and luminous engineering), and the latter thanks to them having mostly eschewed the Italian violin concertos everyone usually reaches for in favour of concertos for one of multiple recorders, plus repertoire for viola da gamba – an instrument which had largely had its day on the professional scene by this point, but which was still enthusiastically played by amateurs. Consequently their curtain-raiser is William Babell's magnificent Concerto II Op. 3 for sixth flute (a bright-sounding Baroque recorder sitting closest in size and range to the standard soprano/descent), which would have been played in theatres during opera intervals. Here it sounds nothing less than ravishing, luminous-toned duetting violins poetically setting the scene before Sébastien Marq's recorder soars in gracefully over the top to begin its songful chirruping. Two further recorder-shaped highlights come from the pen of Johann Christian Schickhardt. First chamber music in the form of a sprightly performance of his reworking of Corelli Op. 6 movements into a trio for two alto recorders and continuo, aimed at the amateur musician market; then his own Concerto II Op. 19 for two recorders and two traverso flutes, played here with sublime tones and blending. La Rêveuse then take the genius decision to end not with another operatic shout, but instead with opera music recast for home music making: Haymarket Theatre bassoonist Pietro Chaboud's intimate bass viol and continuo arrangement of Nicola Francesco Haym's soulful aria, “Thus with thirst my souls expiring”, delectably brought off here by ensemble directors Florence Bolton on viol and Benjamin Perrot on theorbo. Highly recommended. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 8, 2008 | Mirare

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Classical - Released April 24, 2008 | Mirare