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Pop - Released November 19, 2013 | earMUSIC

British pop singer Kim Wild presents Wilde Winter Songbook, a holiday compilation that features a mix of classic Christmas songs, covers of contemporary seasonal songs, and original music. The album includes a duet with Rick Astley on "Winter Wonderland" and a cover of Fleet Foxes' "White Winter Hymnal." © Liam Martin /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 9, 1982 | Cherry Pop

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Pop - Released June 28, 1981 | Cherry Pop

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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Kim Wilde's sixth album is the first since the commercially viable but artistically weak artistic makeover that began with 1984's Teases and Dares to approach the quality of her first three albums. For the first time in three albums, Wilde sounds as if she's comfortable with the music she's making; that this music is clearly inspired by the chart success of the Stock-Aitken-Waterman production team, then having enormous hits with Bananarama, Kylie Minogue and others, might seems a little calculated, but it must be said: Stock, Aitken & Waterman had huge hits because they made unapologetically catchy, uncomplicated pop singles, and that's never a bad thing. Toning down the Hi-NRG disco sound of her two previous albums, Wilde moves into a dance-pop style that suits both the songs and her voice better. The production is handled by Ricky Wilde and Tony Swain (who had co-produced Bananarama's early records), and although it's still slick, the album isn't nearly as antiseptic as Another Step or Teases and Dares. The singles "You Came" and "Hey Mr. Heartache" are much improved (both were U.K. hits, although the album didn't generate much heat in the U.S.) over Wilde's recent chart efforts, and album tracks like "Four-Letter Word" and "European Soul" sound like the singer's having fun for the first time in a while. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 31, 2006 | Lily Music

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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Kim Wilde's fifth album was her eventual American breakthrough, finally giving the British singer a Top Ten hit with a Hi-NRG cover of the Supremes' "You Keep Me Hangin' On." Competent but not groundbreaking, it was a perfectly fine, albeit not particularly memorable, single, which pretty much sums up the rest of Another Step as well. All of Wilde's previous records were produced by her brother Ricky Wilde, but although he's in charge of not quite half of this album, the rest is essayed by the Michael Jackson-related hitmaking team of Bruce Swedien and Rod Temperton, synth pop expert Richard James Burgess, and, on two tracks, Wilde herself. Naturally, the tag-team approach gives Another Step a frustratingly all-over-the-place feel, but Wilde's voice, considerably improved from chirpy early records like "Kids in America," mostly holds the album together. The album's other singles, the Temperton/Swedien effort "Say You Really Want Me" (which, to no one's surprise, sounds like a Michael Jackson reject) and the soul-pop duet with British R&B singer Junior, "Another Step (Closer to You)," sound like label-mandated product. Other tracks, like the perky "I Got So Much Love" and the downright giddy "Schoolgirl," are more listenable, but the now-dated state-of-1986 production makes even the decent tunes a bit trying at times. Another Step is an improvement over 1984's dismal Teases and Dares, but that's not saying much. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 13, 2006 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released December 1, 2008 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released September 12, 2011 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released August 16, 2019 | earMUSIC

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Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | Universal Music

Kim Wilde's number one cover of the Supremes' "You Keep Me Hangin' On" gave her a number one hit back in 1987, but she gained chart life five years earlier with the glitzy bounce of "Kids in America," allied with the new decade's keyboard-laden pop sound and peaking at number 25 on Billboard's Top 40. The Singles Collection 1981-1993 is easily the most opportune avenue available to investigate the rest of Wilde's material. While video may have been her best friend throughout her career, sporting her attractive looks and modest Brit attitude, Wilde's music does contain some pleasing dance hooks and catchy melodies. "Another Step (Closer to You)" and "Love Is Holy" are bright and lively with typical yet congenial pop melodies, while "You Came" mixes a clean, keyboard-aided backdrop to Wilde's sheer vocal style. "Chequered Love" and "Water on Glass" aren't genius, but their arrant pop melodies and simplistic beats are anything but standstill. Even minor efforts like "Rage to Love" and "Never Trust a Stranger" find a way of hurdling clichéd '80s pop/rock fabrications so that they sound slightly fresh and breezy. Only the unbecoming "Cambodia" and the hollowed out "Child Come Away" should be avoided on this collection, as both lack the spirit that Wilde usually packs. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1990 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released May 18, 1992 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released November 7, 1988 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released October 24, 1983 | Cherry Pop

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Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released January 1, 1984 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Because Kim Wilde's original British label, RAK records, had been unable to establish the singer as an American star despite her 1981 semi-hit "Kids in America" -- her third album hadn't even found a U.S. distributor -- Wilde and her manager father (former '50s pop star Marty Wilde) moved to the multinational conglomerate MCA, which recast the young singer in an entirely new light. Gone was the new wave synth pop feel of her earlier work, replaced by a sleekly electronic Hi-NRG disco sound and a sexier image. Although the change in direction would reap rewards (financial ones, anyway) in the future, Teases & Dares is a limp, shaky record, probably the weakest of Wilde's career. Frustratingly, the best songs are those which hint at a more intriguing direction, that of a sort of new wave torch singer. Dramatic ballads like "Fit In," "Shangri-La," and "Thought It Was Goodbye" (all of which, interestingly, were written by Wilde herself, a new development) are much more listenable than soggy, repetitive dance tracks like "The Touch" and "The Second Time." However, both of those songs were hits, and so Wilde's future was sealed. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 18, 1996 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released March 16, 2018 | Wildeflower Records

Here Come the Aliens takes its title from a possible close encounter Kim Wilde had in her garden in 2009, but the campy cover art -- designed by her niece Scarlet -- suggest that the singer doesn't take herself too seriously, at least as far as extra-terrestrials go. Music is a different matter. Working once again with her brother Ricky -- he produced the whole thing and co-wrote the songs -- Wilde is cool and confident, creating a nice hybrid of arena rock and Euro-pop filtered through just a slight prism of New Wave nostalgia. She provides enough callbacks to her pulsating neon salad days to pull in punters, but she and her brother fight against retro signifiers, choosing to operate thoroughly in the present. Some of her lyrics may be a bit stridently modern -- the titles of "Kandy Krush" and "Cyber Nation War" say it all -- but Wilde kicks up some very appealing glam ("A Different Story") and heartfelt bubblegum ("Pop Don't Stop") that makes this record a welcome surprise: It not only holds true to Wilde's roots, it deepens them. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 1, 1988 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Kim Wilde's sixth album is the first since the commercially viable but artistically weak artistic makeover that began with 1984's Teases and Dares to approach the quality of her first three albums. For the first time in three albums, Wilde sounds as if she's comfortable with the music she's making; that this music is clearly inspired by the chart success of the Stock-Aitken-Waterman production team, then having enormous hits with Bananarama, Kylie Minogue and others, might seems a little calculated, but it must be said: Stock, Aitken & Waterman had huge hits because they made unapologetically catchy, uncomplicated pop singles, and that's never a bad thing. Toning down the Hi-NRG disco sound of her two previous albums, Wilde moves into a dance-pop style that suits both the songs and her voice better. The production is handled by Ricky Wilde and Tony Swain (who had co-produced Bananarama's early records), and although it's still slick, the album isn't nearly as antiseptic as Another Step or Teases and Dares. The singles "You Came" and "Hey Mr. Heartache" are much improved (both were U.K. hits, although the album didn't generate much heat in the U.S.) over Wilde's recent chart efforts, and album tracks like "Four-Letter Word" and "European Soul" sound like the singer's having fun for the first time in a while. © Stewart Mason /TiVo