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Pop - Released January 1, 2004 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
The English music press can never let anyone be. They're always quick to hail the next big thing, and in this case, the next big Coldplay is Keane. (Lowgold briefly held that title upon its debut release in 2001, but U.K. critics rushed to give that crown to someone else.) Keane haven't positioned themselves to be kings of anything, though, let alone the next Coldplay. Sure, Coldplay's biggest hit to date, "Clocks," included only pianos, and they released the Safety EP on Fierce Panda, which is also Keane's label, but those are the only things Keane have in common with Coldplay. Alongside their beautiful, emotive dalliance of instrumentation is one thing that'll separate Keane from all the rest, and that's drive. The band's open-hearted ambition on Hopes and Fears is audible on every song. Lead vocalist Tom Chaplin's rich vocals are as vibrant as any choir, and track such as "This Is the Last Time," "Bend and Break," and "Can't Stop Now" reflect Keane's more savory, dramatic moments. Confidence bursts throughout, and for a band that has been around seven years and has never released a studio full-length album until now, achieving nearly epic-like status is quite impressive. Keane obviously have the songs and they have a strong voice leading the front; however, Tim Rice-Oxley (piano/keyboards/bass) and Richard Hughes (drums) allow Hopes and Fears to come alive with glamour and without the sheen of slick studio production. Even slow build-up tracks like "Bedshaped" and "We Might as Well Be Strangers" are just as passionate, if not more so, than some of the bigger numbers on the album. Some might find Keane's debut a bit stagy, or too theatrical at first, but that's okay. Listening to "Somewhere Only We Know" alone a few times is more than enough to convince you that Keane stand next to Coldplay -- challenging them rather than emulating -- and it's a respectable match at that. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Released to coincide with the heartfelt English alt-rockers' tenth recording anniversary (Keane formed in 1997 and waited seven years to release their long-player), this career retrospective collects 18 fan and band favorites culled from their four (as of 2013) studio albums, as well as two new singles, the ebullient "Higher Than the Sun" and the anthemic "Won't Be Broken." A piano rock band even less dangerous than Coldplay, Keane found a winning formula in 2004 with their debut album, Hopes and Fears, a slickly produced smorgasbord of amorous/lovelorn pop anthems and ballads that were made all the more vibrant and radio-ready by being delivered via the angelic croon of vocalist Tom Chaplin. The record cleaned up at awards season and spawned the group's two biggest hits in "Everybody's Changing" and "Somewhere Only We Know," which unsurprisingly reside at the one and two spots, respectively, on The Best of Keane. Released in 2006, Under the Iron Sea followed suit with the U.K. smash "Is It Any Wonder?," as well as lesser hits like "Crystal Ball," "A Bad Dream," and "Atlantic," all of which are included here, while 2008's Perfect Symmetry and 2012's Strangeland, though not as well regarded as the band's first two outings, were still brimming with considerable melodic pop riches like "Spiralling," "Silenced by the Night," and "Sovereign Light Café," helping the group to mark its ten-year run by selling over ten million records worldwide. The Best of Keane is also available in a deluxe edition that includes a bonus disc of B-sides, and in a super deluxe edition that adds both the B-sides disc and a DVD. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2019 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Making a welcome comeback after a lengthy seven-year hiatus, English quartet Keane returned with their fifth full-length effort, Cause and Effect. Steeped in the heartbreak and complications that arise from a devastating breakup, the album followed a particularly tumultuous period in the band's history, during which time frontman Tom Chaplin battled addiction and kicked off a successful solo career, while main songwriter Tim Rice-Oxley faced his own demons and saw his marriage dissolve. As such, Cause and Effect forms a loose emotional trilogy with their breakthrough debut, Hopes and Fears, and its dark follow-up, Under the Iron Sea, only this time matured by an appropriately adult point of view. In typical Keane fashion, the heartache is deceptively masked by some beautiful, soaring musical backing and Chaplin doing his best to translate Rice-Oxley's pain with his gorgeous vocals, echoing early-era output like "The Lovers Are Losing," "Bend & Break," and "Leaving So Soon?" Less immediate than prior Keane releases, Cause and Effect's true power reveals itself through the deeply sad lyrics, which bolster softer tracks such as "Phases" and "Thread" with unflinching vulnerability. Charting the lowest points of a relationship headed for ruin ("Strange Room" and "Stupid Things" are especially moving), these poetic confessionals create a cohesive experience that is relatable, depressingly bittersweet, and, ultimately, very cathartic for anyone who's ever been in a similar situation. Not completely wallowing in self-pity, Cause and Effect also includes a handful of driving anthems that stand tall aside past hits, including the bright, Night Train-esque "Love Too Much" and the huge pop single "The Way I Feel," which is the most "classic Keane"-sounding the band has been in over a decade. Amongst these familiar highs and lows lie a couple of standout deep cuts worth further attention. The painfully pretty "Put the Radio On" pushes denial with an insistent bass groove and atmospherics from Under the Iron Sea that glitter to life, transitioning the energy of the first third of the album into the more pensive material to follow, while delicate closer "I Need Your Love" features an electronic breakdown that precedes a yearning hymnal that ends the album on a strong, emotionally impactful note. Not a game-changing comeback by any means, Cause and Effect is instead a satisfying return to form that manages to gracefully age Keane by invigorating a familiar formula with wisdom and honesty learned over a dramatic, life-changing decade. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2012 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Keane's fourth outing trades in the officious electro-pop flourishes that peppered 2008's Perfect Symmetry for a more familiar approach. Closer in tone to 2006's Under the Iron Sea, some may find Strangeland's reliable mix of Coldplay, Snow Patrol, and "Sit Down"-era James to be a bit rote, but when it comes to crafting relatively safe, achingly melodic, and terminally sincere adult alternative rock songs, there are few groups as prodigious as the East Sussex quartet. Bolstered by a pair of stadium-ready singles in "Disconnected" and "Silence by the Night," both of which occur (in classic LP fashion) early on, Strangeland works best when it sticks to the formula, providing a hook, a line, and a sinker before landing the listener with the kind of colossal chorus that results in the frantic rolling up or down of car windows. More contemplative moments, like the lilting "Black Rain," the lovely "Neon River," and the appropriately epic closer "Sea Fog" work just as well, dialing back the cymbal swells in favor of a more measured level of melodrama. Strangeland never really lives up to its mysterious title, as there's nothing on it that doesn’t feel willfully nostalgic, but like any good plate of comfort food (for those with larger appetites, there's a 16-track extended version, and a 24-track CD/DVD combo) it satisfies in a way that more adventurous meals never truly can. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Released to coincide with the heartfelt English alt-rockers' tenth recording anniversary (Keane formed in 1997 and waited seven years to release their long-player), this career retrospective collects 18 fan and band favorites culled from their four (as of 2013) studio albums, as well as two new singles, the ebullient "Higher Than the Sun" and the anthemic "Won't Be Broken." A piano rock band even less dangerous than Coldplay, Keane found a winning formula in 2004 with their debut album, Hopes and Fears, a slickly produced smorgasbord of amorous/lovelorn pop anthems and ballads that were made all the more vibrant and radio-ready by being delivered via the angelic croon of vocalist Tom Chaplin. The record cleaned up at awards season and spawned the group's two biggest hits in "Everybody's Changing" and "Somewhere Only We Know," which unsurprisingly reside at the one and two spots, respectively, on The Best of Keane. Released in 2006, Under the Iron Sea followed suit with the U.K. smash "Is It Any Wonder?," as well as lesser hits like "Crystal Ball," "A Bad Dream," and "Atlantic," all of which are included here, while 2008's Perfect Symmetry and 2012's Strangeland, though not as well regarded as the band's first two outings, were still brimming with considerable melodic pop riches like "Spiralling," "Silenced by the Night," and "Sovereign Light Café," helping the group to mark its ten-year run by selling over ten million records worldwide. The Best of Keane is also available in a deluxe edition that includes a bonus disc of B-sides, and in a super deluxe edition that adds both the B-sides disc and a DVD. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 10, 2004 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The English music press can never let anyone be. They're always quick to hail the next big thing, and in this case, the next big Coldplay is Keane. (Lowgold briefly held that title upon its debut release in 2001, but U.K. critics rushed to give that crown to someone else.) Keane haven't positioned themselves to be kings of anything, though, let alone the next Coldplay. Sure, Coldplay's biggest hit to date, "Clocks," included only pianos, and they released the Safety EP on Fierce Panda, which is also Keane's label, but those are the only things Keane have in common with Coldplay. Alongside their beautiful, emotive dalliance of instrumentation is one thing that'll separate Keane from all the rest, and that's drive. The band's open-hearted ambition on Hopes and Fears is audible on every song. Lead vocalist Tom Chaplin's rich vocals are as vibrant as any choir, and track such as "This Is the Last Time," "Bend and Break," and "Can't Stop Now" reflect Keane's more savory, dramatic moments. Confidence bursts throughout, and for a band that has been around seven years and has never released a studio full-length album until now, achieving nearly epic-like status is quite impressive. Keane obviously have the songs and they have a strong voice leading the front; however, Tim Rice-Oxley (piano/keyboards/bass) and Richard Hughes (drums) allow Hopes and Fears to come alive with glamour and without the sheen of slick studio production. Even slow build-up tracks like "Bedshaped" and "We Might as Well Be Strangers" are just as passionate, if not more so, than some of the bigger numbers on the album. Some might find Keane's debut a bit stagy, or too theatrical at first, but that's okay. Listening to "Somewhere Only We Know" alone a few times is more than enough to convince you that Keane stand next to Coldplay -- challenging them rather than emulating -- and it's a respectable match at that. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Booklet
Keane bids adieu to balladry and ushers in a different style -- '80s pop -- with Perfect Symmetry. While the album isn't solely devoted to exploring that new genre, it's certainly the focus, and "Spiralling" appropriately kickstarts the set with whooping vocals and retro synthesizers. "When we fall in love," sings Tom Chaplin in his stadium-sized voice, "we're just falling in love with ourselves." Coming from the same mouth that once crooned the earnest strains of "Somewhere Only We Know," those lyrics are wholly different -- a sign that four years spent in the shadow of U2, Coldplay, and other like-minded bands have convinced Keane to make their own Achtung Baby. Of course, that album saw U2 turning sonic experimentation into something entirely inventive, which Perfect Symmetry doesn't quite accomplish with its own mixture. This isn't quite art, after all; it's mostly just fun, shot through with a self-consciously cheesy approach that's engineered to sound little like the department-store rock of 2004's Hopes and Fears. "Fun" seems to be at the top of the band's agenda, though, and Perfect Symmetry succeeds in doing away with most of the pre-conceived notions that accompany Keane records. The "old" sound doesn't even surface until midway through the album, when the album's title track offers up a combination of sparse piano notes (later giving way to dense, double-fisted arpeggios) and a meteoric chorus. But that's the exception, not the rule, and Perfect Symmetry sounds more comfortable during its truly unexpected moments: the spacy blips and bleeps of "You Haven't Told Me Anything," the synthesized anthem "Again and Again," and the energetic "Wooooooh!" that opens the entire album. The band's biggest strength remains Chaplin's ability to turn a melodic phrase with grace and dexterity, which fails to lose its vitality no matter the musical context, but Keane's willingness to take these left-hand turns deserves its own share of applause. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 12, 2006 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

In the two years that followed the release of their debut album, Keane established themselves as a promising part of the mainstream rock canon. Hit singles like "Somewhere Only We Know," "Bedshaped," and "Everything's Changing" made Hopes and Fears a transatlantic hit, earning the trio two Brit Awards, a Grammy nomination, and a host of sold-out world tours. Critics deemed them as likeable and as accessible as Coldplay, but Keane's return isn't as buoyant as their initial introduction, even if it keeps melody at the forefront. Whereas Hopes and Fears faced uncertainty head on with joyous enthusiasm, Under the Iron Sea is a darker, less romantic set of songs affected by a disenchanted outlook on life and the world's problems. Keane's members feels the frustration of a world torn apart by war, but they also express their own growing pains as a group. Songs such as the grayish ebb and flow of "A Bad Dream" and "Crystal Ball" connect with those reflections. Frontman Tom Chaplin faces the disappointment of growing older on the haunting "Atlantic," another stone-cold gem of synthesizer strings and Tim Rice-Oxley's gorgeous piano delivery. Just when you think it might be totally depressing, though, there are some hints of life hidden in the corners of Under the Iron Sea, and these mysterious loops highlight Keane's new sonic experiments. Thus far they've existed without guitars -- and although the bounty of this record breathes with a collection of various analog synths and an old electric piano, Rice-Oxley's performance is now enhanced with a bevy of guitar effect pedals. Debut single "It Is Any Wonder?" is layered with distorted keyboards as Chaplin cries out, "Stranded in the wrong time/Where love is just a lyric in a children's rhyme, a soundbite." The song was ostensibly written about the Iraq War -- specifically Britian's involvement -- and it's a move forward in both lyrical content and musical delivery. Keane should be applauded for going after a different sound; there's no harm in that, even though some die-hard fans might rush to judge Under the Iron Sea as sounding a bit too much like U2. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2012 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Keane's fourth outing trades in the officious electro-pop flourishes that peppered 2008's Perfect Symmetry for a more familiar approach. Closer in tone to 2006's Under the Iron Sea, some may find Strangeland's reliable mix of Coldplay, Snow Patrol, and "Sit Down"-era James to be a bit rote, but when it comes to crafting relatively safe, achingly melodic, and terminally sincere adult alternative rock songs, there are few groups as prodigious as the East Sussex quartet. Bolstered by a pair of stadium-ready singles in "Disconnected" and "Silence by the Night," both of which occur (in classic LP fashion) early on, Strangeland works best when it sticks to the formula, providing a hook, a line, and a sinker before landing the listener with the kind of colossal chorus that results in the frantic rolling up or down of car windows. More contemplative moments, like the lilting "Black Rain," the lovely "Neon River," and the appropriately epic closer "Sea Fog" work just as well, dialing back the cymbal swells in favor of a more measured level of melodrama. Strangeland never really lives up to its mysterious title, as there's nothing on it that doesn’t feel willfully nostalgic, but like any good plate of comfort food (for those with larger appetites, there's a 16-track extended version, and a 24-track CD/DVD combo) it satisfies in a way that more adventurous meals never truly can. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

You’ve gotta give it to Keane -- the guys aren’t afraid to reinvent themselves, even if it means decreased record sales. After being typecast as ballad-loving, tender-hearted crooners with their 2004 debut, they spent the following four years dismantling the myth that they were the next Coldplay. Released in 2006, Under the Iron Sea found them skewering Tony Blair’s politics and disguising Tim Rice-Oxley’s keyboard with guitar pedals, while 2008’s Perfect Symmetry highlighted their goofy side, not to mention a love for cheesy ‘80s pop. Night Train takes most of its cues from that last album, but it also ventures into newer territory, featuring an ambient instrumental opening track as well as contributions from two R&B musicians (Somali hip-hop artist K’Naan and Japanese singer Tigarah). K’Naan’s presence isn’t limited to a mere cameo; he appears on two songs and actively steers both, turning “Looking Back” into a pop/funk/soft rock hybrid and bringing a sense Timberlake-ish digital pop to “Stop for a Minute.” When left to their own devices, Keane continue exploring the sounds that Perfect Symmetry introduced, often paying as much attention to the songs’ production as the actual tunes themselves. It’s all very eclectic and a bit unexpected, two qualities that seem to be Keane’s modus operandi as of late, although Tom Chaplin's vocals still pack the biggest punch. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2018 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 8, 2019 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released June 6, 2019 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released January 1, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released May 17, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released November 29, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 23, 2016 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Pop - Released September 21, 2004 | Fierce Panda Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The English music press can never let anyone be. They're always quick to hail the next big thing, and in this case, the next big Coldplay is Keane. (Lowgold briefly held that title upon its debut release in 2001, but U.K. critics rushed to give that crown to someone else.) Keane haven't positioned themselves to be kings of anything, though, let alone the next Coldplay. Sure, Coldplay's biggest hit to date, "Clocks," included only pianos, and they released the Safety EP on Fierce Panda, which is also Keane's label, but those are the only things Keane have in common with Coldplay. Alongside their beautiful, emotive dalliance of instrumentation is one thing that'll separate Keane from all the rest, and that's drive. The band's open-hearted ambition on Hopes and Fears is audible on every song. Lead vocalist Tom Chaplin's rich vocals are as vibrant as any choir, and track such as "This Is the Last Time," "Bend and Break," and "Can't Stop Now" reflect Keane's more savory, dramatic moments. Confidence bursts throughout, and for a band that has been around seven years and has never released a studio full-length album until now, achieving nearly epic-like status is quite impressive. Keane obviously have the songs and they have a strong voice leading the front; however, Tim Rice-Oxley (piano/keyboards/bass) and Richard Hughes (drums) allow Hopes and Fears to come alive with glamour and without the sheen of slick studio production. Even slow build-up tracks like "Bedshaped" and "We Might as Well Be Strangers" are just as passionate, if not more so, than some of the bigger numbers on the album. Some might find Keane's debut a bit stagy, or too theatrical at first, but that's okay. Listening to "Somewhere Only We Know" alone a few times is more than enough to convince you that Keane stand next to Coldplay -- challenging them rather than emulating -- and it's a respectable match at that. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo