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Classical - Released June 22, 2015 | Decca

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor

Released shortly after the Welsh soprano turned 30, the Katherine Jenkins compilation The Ultimate Collection is a good summation of her recording career so far. In that sense, it tends to confirm the impression of her as essentially a blonde, 20-years-younger Sarah Brightman, to the point of repeating many songs associated with Brightman, such as "Time to Say Goodbye," "Pie Jesu," and "The Music of the Night." In the classical crossover world of Brightman and Jenkins, one takes familiar pop ballads and show tunes and finds ways to suggest that they are to be considered classical music. Thus, Jenkins sings the Dolly Parton-penned Whitney Houston hit "I Will Always Love You" and the theme from Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You" (written by Bryan Adams, Michael Kamen, and Mutt Lange, and a hit for Adams), in Italian, as if they were arias from lost operas. She also takes on show tunes like "I Could Have Danced All Night" and "Don't Cry for Me Argentina." And she treats Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" as if it were a sacred hymn. (It isn't, but she's not the first singer to think it is, and for Cohen, that's made it his most valuable copyright since "Suzanne.") Of course, she also does a few actual classical pieces. From a pop perspective, it seems odd that she re-covers so much oft-covered material. But from a classical perspective, it simply may be that Brightman has established a classical crossover repertoire, and as with any classical repertoire, each succeeding generation has the right and obligation to reinterpret it. Certainly, Jenkins' sales indicate that her audience is perfectly happy to hear her sing this crop of recent warhorses, and The Ultimate Collection puts them on one disc. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Classical - Released April 22, 2016 | Decca

Celebration sees Welsh operatic vocalist Katherine Jenkins pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II with a collection of patriotic numbers. Released to coincide with the Queen's 90th birthday, the album features renditions of Amazing Grace, Jerusalem, and Abide with Me as well as the full three verse version of God Save the Queen. ~ Rich Wilson
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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor

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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca

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Classical - Released October 26, 2009 | WM UK

Reflecting her most high-profile year to date thanks to some controversial tabloid confessions, a celebrity relationship, and a judging role on ITV's Popstar to Operastar, Welsh soprano Katherine Jenkins' seventh studio album, Believe, is undoubtedly the most accessible and commercial offering of her six-year career. The traditional opera standards and arias of her early albums Premiere and Second Nature are instead replaced by classical pop renditions of contemporary pop songs and film themes produced by Grammy Award-winning David Foster (Michael Bublé, Celine Dion). Of course, the likes of Sarah McLachlan's "Angel," Queen's "Who Wants to Live Forever," and Nino Rota's "Parla Più Piano (Love Theme from The Godfather)" are fairly predictable fare for classical crossover artists, having been covered on recent albums from Angelis, Rhydian, and Patrizio Buanne. However, her reworking of Evanescence's nu-metal chart-topper "Bring Me to Life," which adds even more overblown drama to the epic original, and a surprisingly subtle cover version of Bob Marley's "No Woman, No Cry" are clear indications that Jenkins isn't afraid to tackle material far outside her comfort zone. Elsewhere, Jenkins' breathtaking and versatile vocal abilities are showcased on a stunning performance of Edith Piaf's "La Vie en Rose," a stirring duet with Andrea Bocelli on "I Believe," and the album's only original composition, "Ancora Non Sai," which also features Dutch violinist André Rieu. A Deluxe Edition, featuring the theme from Andrew Lloyd Webber's new musical Love Never Dies and a rendition of Lionel Richie and Diana Ross' "Endless Love" was later released, but it was the 2010 Platinum Edition that helped the album reenter the charts over a year after its initial peak. Adding seven new tracks to the original, it includes two festive songs, "In the Bleak Midwinter" and a live performance of "O Holy Night" with Michael Bolton, a gorgeous operatic interpretation of Embrace's "Gravity," and "Tell Me I'm Not Dreaming," a brand-new ballad produced by John Shanks (Bon Jovi). Believe, in all its forms, is a huge leap forward from her previous traditional output, and although there's still enough material to keep her classical fan base happy, its leanings toward more contemporary fare suggest that a Charlotte Church-style pop career re-invention could well be in the cards, something which -- on this evidence -- Jenkins is more than capable of pulling off. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Universal Music

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Classical - Released October 10, 2011 | Reprise

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Universal Music

PREMIERE, as the title indicates, is the debut album by British light classical vocalist Katherine Jenkins. A technically gifted soprano who also has an unmistakable grace and lightness to her tone, Jenkins is a wonderfully expressive singer. The 14 tracks here focus on the classical side of her repertoire, although a small handful of folk and pop tunes add variety and depth. Originally released in 2003, this edition is its first U.S. issue.
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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca

Welsh mezzo-soprano Katherine Jenkins is showcased on her second album of holiday-themed material, 2013’s My Christmas. An award-winning, classically trained singer who came to prominence after performing at Pope John Paul II’s silver jubilee in 2003, Jenkins has built a loyal fan base around her mix of opera arias, musical theater, and classical-crossover pop songs. On My Christmas, she delivers a warm and lushly produced collection of Holiday and Christmas classics including such compositions as "O Holy Night," "Ave Maria," "Audate Dominum," "Hallelujah," and others. ~ Matt Collar
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Classical - Released November 10, 2014 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Classical - Released October 3, 2011 | WM UK

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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal Music

Come Christmas time, and there's another album, the fifth, from the Welsh soprano Katherine Jenkins. This time she mixed it up a little with a bit of classical, "Sancta Maria" from Mascagni's Callellera Rusticana and "Be Still My Soul" from Sibelius' Finlandia, a little bit of show biz with "Secret Love" from Calamity Jane and "Somewhere" from West Side Story, a little bit of pop cover versions with "I Who Have Nothing," originally made famous by Shirley Bassey, and Seal's "Kiss from a Rose," and finally a few new songs especially written for her, pop songs with two contributions each from Steve Mac & Wayne Hector, better known for their work with Westlife and Il Divo, and Gary Barlow who contributed the songs "Shout in Silence" and "Viva Tonight." Jenkins was being marketed by Universal Classics and Jazz at this point as a known name, an artist whom they would expect to chart in the Top Ten with every album, and Rejoice didn't disappoint, hitting number three in its first week, her highest placing on the charts to that point. However, it did disappoint some of her core fans who had been expecting more with her classical arias and crossover songs sung in her mezzo soprano voice, with which she had been achieving more and more success as the years went by. What wasn't expected was a crossover into the pop market. Not that she'd joined the ranks of Charlotte Church and released a full-on dance pop album, for even the new tracks were beautifully sung pieces, sounding every bit the arias as the Sibelius and Mascagni songs, and while she had been on this crossover path for several years, covering "Everything I Do" and "Be My Love" on Serenade, and "Music of the Night," "Amazing Grace," and "Over the Rainbow" on Living a Dream, they appeared to suit her voice more than the selection on Rejoice, particularly "Kiss from a Rose," which really didn't work, and "Somewhere" which for anybody who has seen the film West Side Story (and there are countless millions of them) will know, came at one of the most emotionally charged moments in film as Tony lay dying, but one would never associate this scene with the version of the tune sung by Jenkins. And the songs by Gary Barlow, as good a songwriter as he was, were not two of his best. Nevertheless, the supermarket traffic pushed Rejoice high into the charts, and Jenkins appeared sexier on the cover art, too, with a Mariah Carey style, flowing hairstyle, and what one would presume was an off the shoulder, strapless dress (as all one could see was bare shoulders). Compare that to her earlier work and the polo neck sweater on Premiere. ~ Sharon Mawer
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Classical - Released October 23, 2009 | WM UK

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Universal Music

Katherine Jenkins, the Welsh soprano and multiple Classical Brits winner, released her fourth album aimed at a pop crossover market, and for the second consecutive time saw an album soar into the Top Five of the album charts. Serenade is rather a misnamed title for the album, as Jenkins hardly serenaded anybody but tackled a set of difficult arias, Chanson Bohème from Bizet (one of her dream roles being to play Carmen live on-stage), O Mio Babbino Caro by Puccini, and Pachelbel's Canon. There is a guest appearance by Kiri Te Kanawa on The Flower Duet, and when she tired of the classics, she included the Mario Lanza favorite "Be My Love," which does lack some of the power coming from a female voice, and covered the pop songs "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You" -- sung in Italian as "(Quello Che Faró) Sarà Per Te" with Bryan Adams on guitar -- and "The Green Green Grass of Home" with backing vocals by the Treorchy Male Choir. The final songs on the album were of a religious nature, including "The Prayer" and "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind," and the album ends with the old favorite Ave Maria. ~ Sharon Mawer
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Originally released in Europe in 2005 but not available in the United States until 2009, Living a Dream finds light classical singer Katherine Jenkins in a somewhat pop-oriented mood. The album's signature song is a dramatic version of Dolly Parton's "I Will Always Love You," reworked into a near-operatic Italian-language slice of glorious pop melodrama. The rest of the album blends arias and classical material with more familiar pop tunes like "Over the Rainbow" and the World War II anthem "We'll Meet Again." ~ Charity Stafford
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Classical - Released October 30, 2012 | WM UK

Welsh mezzo-soprano Katherine Jenkins' first official holiday album sounds exactly like what one would expect from the reigning queen of the classical crossover charts. Lush, languid, and lovingly orchestrated, the succinct, ten-track This Is Christmas is certainly bereft of surprises, catering to the comforts of the season by sticking with the standards ("Hark the Herald Angels Sing," "Deck the Halls," "The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)," "Away in a Manger"), despite tossing in a sugar plum-encrusted curve ball with a swooning rendition of "Come What May" from Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge. Throughout it all, Jenkins further cements her reputation as one of the 21st century's vocal pop greats, instilling each familiar melody, whether it be sacred ("O Come O Come Emmanuel") or silly ("Santa Baby") with the warmth of a thousand fireplaces. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Classical - Released December 4, 2009 | WM UK