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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

On a first listen to Kate Nash's debut Made of Bricks, it's easy to hear the similarities to her contemporaries (Lily Allen, the Streets, Amy Winehouse) and influences (Björk, Robbie Williams). Her most popular songs are both intimate and confrontational, using brief portraits and slang-conversational vocals to illustrate the larger issues going on -- the dinner party that exposes a crumbling relationship on "Foundations" or the futility of using "Mouthwash" as a defense against feelings of low self-worth. The music is explosive and sample-driven, but with plenty of ties to contemporary pop, such as the frequent piano runs and occasional chamber brass or woodwinds. Spend time with this album, however, and Nash is revealed as much more than the sum of her parts. First, she's an excellent songwriter who illustrates her tales of romantic woe and inadequacies with grace and many subtleties. (It's easy to see why Allen saw Nash not as a rival but a fellow artist, and how the two quickly became friends.) Nash's frequent sing-speak vocals and rather, erm, direct manner on some songs ("Dickhead," "Shit Song") are what most naysayers immediately point to, but her quiet rage on the former track is tremendously effective. Still, what impresses the most about Made of Bricks are her deft sketches of deteriorating relationships, whether they're being loudly destroyed ("Foundations" again) or wryly and tenderly closing ("Birds"). Nash has plenty of maturation to do as a songwriter and performer, but she shows considerable promise on this debut. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 30, 2018 | Girl Gang Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 19, 2021 | Girl Gang Records

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Pop - Released April 19, 2010 | Polydor Records

Kate Nash had a lot to live up to with her sophomore album. Her debut was clever and brash, a deeply personal record filled with wit and the self-made, oddball productions to match. Second album My Best Friend Is You initially sounds like a different artist entirely, almost akin to a Kate Nash imitator trying to fuse her close observation of relationships with an uptempo Northern soul of the Amy Winehouse variety. Both the opener "Paris" and the first single "Do-Wah-Doo" boast very busy but very trad productions, featuring plenty of brass and piano with insistent drumming and handclaps -- all the hallmarks of a professional production. This is pure MOR, the driving Motown-derived pop-soul that’s become de rigeur for 21st century hipness. Surprisingly, the second half of My Best Friend Is You is Nash at her best, biting and bile-filled, with productions that (finally) suit her songwriting. It's led by the jagged "I've Got a Secret," in which Nash puts on her best angelic school-girl show to drive her point home (very basically put: "You don't love me"). There are more highlights here, including "I Just Love You More," which is simple and successful, just a distorted guitar hook and Nash repeating the title until she bursts into screams for the chorus. Still, the aim over too much of this record seems to be simply getting Kate Nash airplay without worrying overly much about a musical backing that suits her songwriting. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released November 19, 2012 | Have 10p Records.

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Pop - Released August 6, 2007 | Polydor Records

On a first listen to Kate Nash's debut Made of Bricks, it's easy to hear the similarities to her contemporaries (Lily Allen, the Streets, Amy Winehouse) and influences (Björk, Robbie Williams). Her most popular songs are both intimate and confrontational, using brief portraits and slang-conversational vocals to illustrate the larger issues going on -- the dinner party that exposes a crumbling relationship on "Foundations" or the futility of using "Mouthwash" as a defense against feelings of low self-worth. The music is explosive and sample-driven, but with plenty of ties to contemporary pop, such as the frequent piano runs and occasional chamber brass or woodwinds. Spend time with this album, however, and Nash is revealed as much more than the sum of her parts. First, she's an excellent songwriter who illustrates her tales of romantic woe and inadequacies with grace and many subtleties. (It's easy to see why Allen saw Nash not as a rival but a fellow artist, and how the two quickly became friends.) Nash's frequent sing-speak vocals and rather, erm, direct manner on some songs ("Dickhead," "Shit Song") are what most naysayers immediately point to, but her quiet rage on the former track is tremendously effective. Still, what impresses the most about Made of Bricks are her deft sketches of deteriorating relationships, whether they're being loudly destroyed ("Foundations" again) or wryly and tenderly closing ("Birds"). Nash has plenty of maturation to do as a songwriter and performer, but she shows considerable promise on this debut. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 5, 2013 | Have 10p Records.

With her 2010 sophomore album, My Best Friend Is You, British singer/songwriter Kate Nash successfully broadened her intimate folk-pop outlook to a more slickly produced, post-Amy Winehouse neo-soul sound. The change intrigued some and displeased others, but overall it proved that Nash (who was only 20 when she recorded her debut) wasn't content to stick to one sound. She was clearly growing up and growing her sound along the way. Nash takes this growth even further on her third studio album, 2013's raw and rambunctious Girl Talk. Dropping the slick production of her previous album, Nash jumps headlong into a punk- and garage rock-influenced aesthetic that has more in common with such distortion-heavy guitar bands as the Raveonettes, the Kills, and the Dum Dum Girls than it does the neo-soul of the late Winehouse. In many ways, the album seems much more like the D.I.Y.-debut of a new indie rock band than the third effort of an established singer/songwriter. Which should not imply that the album is a disappointment. Far from it; Nash seems to finally be coming into her own as a mature, swaggering rock chick with a strong feminist streak to match the punky blonde ones in her hair. Thankfully, while Nash has moved to a more extroverted, aggressive sound, she hasn't sacrificed any of the personal, intimate lyrics that marked the best of her early songs. Tracks like the propulsive "Fri-end?" and the raging "Sister" are straightforward punk-rawk cuts that mix in-your-face attitude with fierce lyrics that find Nash ruminating on the pitfalls of twenty-something relationships so often fraught with jealousies and desires. On "Sister," she sings "It's not fair to watch you walk away like this/I just wish that I could get one more kiss/ But you gave it, you gave it to another/And it's not fair of me to judge that." This theme of the struggle between female empowerment and romantic jealousy crops up throughout the album. Nash even draws inspiration from Quentin Tarantino's 2007 ode to '70s slasher films, Death Proof itself, a kind of treatise on women in genre movies. On Nash's "Death Proof," an echoey, bass-heavy Morricone-esqe cut, she sneers "You can spend your whole life getting down on one thing/You can waste all your time on one idea/You can get your little brain into one big mess/But what you gonna do now, baby, when it all comes down?" For Nash, the answer -- like all of the fiery, rousing songs that make up Girl Talk -- is to own your life and make of it what you want. Perhaps Nash says it best in her song "All Talk," where she croons "Action, action, action! Words are only in my mouth." © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 21, 2017 | Girl Gang Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 5, 2013 | Girl Gang Records

With her 2010 sophomore album, My Best Friend Is You, British singer/songwriter Kate Nash successfully broadened her intimate folk-pop outlook to a more slickly produced, post-Amy Winehouse neo-soul sound. The change intrigued some and displeased others, but overall it proved that Nash (who was only 20 when she recorded her debut) wasn't content to stick to one sound. She was clearly growing up and growing her sound along the way. Nash takes this growth even further on her third studio album, 2013's raw and rambunctious Girl Talk. Dropping the slick production of her previous album, Nash jumps headlong into a punk- and garage rock-influenced aesthetic that has more in common with such distortion-heavy guitar bands as the Raveonettes, the Kills, and the Dum Dum Girls than it does the neo-soul of the late Winehouse. In many ways, the album seems much more like the D.I.Y.-debut of a new indie rock band than the third effort of an established singer/songwriter. Which should not imply that the album is a disappointment. Far from it; Nash seems to finally be coming into her own as a mature, swaggering rock chick with a strong feminist streak to match the punky blonde ones in her hair. Thankfully, while Nash has moved to a more extroverted, aggressive sound, she hasn't sacrificed any of the personal, intimate lyrics that marked the best of her early songs. Tracks like the propulsive "Fri-end?" and the raging "Sister" are straightforward punk-rawk cuts that mix in-your-face attitude with fierce lyrics that find Nash ruminating on the pitfalls of twenty-something relationships so often fraught with jealousies and desires. On "Sister," she sings "It's not fair to watch you walk away like this/I just wish that I could get one more kiss/ But you gave it, you gave it to another/And it's not fair of me to judge that." This theme of the struggle between female empowerment and romantic jealousy crops up throughout the album. Nash even draws inspiration from Quentin Tarantino's 2007 ode to '70s slasher films, Death Proof itself, a kind of treatise on women in genre movies. On Nash's "Death Proof," an echoey, bass-heavy Morricone-esqe cut, she sneers "You can spend your whole life getting down on one thing/You can waste all your time on one idea/You can get your little brain into one big mess/But what you gonna do now, baby, when it all comes down?" For Nash, the answer -- like all of the fiery, rousing songs that make up Girl Talk -- is to own your life and make of it what you want. Perhaps Nash says it best in her song "All Talk," where she croons "Action, action, action! Words are only in my mouth." © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

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Pop - Released November 26, 2013 | Have 10p Records.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 7, 2021 | Girl Gang Records

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Pop - Released June 23, 2019 | Girl Gang Records

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Rock - Released January 18, 2019 | Girl Gang Records

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Pop - Released November 14, 2016 | Platoon

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 5, 2007 | Moshi Moshi Records

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Pop - Released September 8, 2021 | Maisie Music Publishing, LLC

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Pop - Released August 8, 2016 | Girl Gang Records