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Film Soundtracks - Released September 29, 2009 | Interscope

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are means so much to so many generations that Spike Jonze's film adaptation couldn't be just a typical kids' movie -- it had to be a movie for the entire family. And on every part of the production, Jonze worked with artists so close to him that they might as well have been a family: while bringing the book's story to the big screen, he developed a tight friendship with Sendak; for Where the Wild Things Are's music, Jonze recruited former lover and frequent collaborator Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. In turn, O drafted a who's who of indie rock talent, among them her chief co-writers Bradford Cox of Deerhunter and Yeah Yeah Yeahs associate Imaad Wasif and her bandmates Brian Chase and Nick Zinner, all of whom perform under the aptly storybook name Karen O & the Kids. With their help, O uncovers new musical directions. Wildness abounds in her work with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Native Korean Rock, but neither band's music is particularly childlike. Here, she taps into a rainbow of youthful expression, from "All Is Love"'s pure joy to the tribal festivity of "Rumpus" to "Animal"'s feral folk, which puts O's ferocious scream in a completely different context than her other work. Yet on "Igloo" and "Sailing Home," her voice is gentler than it's been almost anywhere else -- the only other time she has sounded so soft is on "Hello Tomorrow," the song she wrote for Jonze's 2005 Nike television commercial. Likewise, despite the wealth of indie rockers on it, Where the Wild Things Are rarely sounds self-consciously indie, even on the cover of Daniel Johnston's "Worried Shoes." Cox's xylophone gives the album a dreamlike feel, particularly on "Rumpus Reprise," while Zinner's guitar is unmistakable on the excellent "Capsize," which moves from a fierce tantrum to sweeping mystery like its own self-contained story. Balancing abstract pieces with more attention-getting pop songs like the adorable "Heads Up," Where the Wild Things Are doesn't resemble a typical children's film soundtrack, although it will make a great first soundtrack for kids' music collections. Neither a straightforward score nor a collection of kid-friendly indie rock songs, it lies somewhere intriguingly in between -- and it's just as good, if not better, than the music these artists make with their main projects. ~ Heather Phares
£12.49
£10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 15, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
What an odd duo: On the left, the ex-singer of the garage band Yeah Yeah Yeahs. On the right, the second half of Gnarls Barkley, who managed to take some time off from the thousands of projects she is already involved with. Their collaboration gives birth to a series of vintage and sophisticated pop songs, enigmatic at first but ultimately fascinating. Laidback and melancholic, both sensual and opulent, Karen O’s voice has a dreamlike quality reminiscent of major singers from the 1960’s. Facing her, Brian Burton, aka Danger Mouse, pulls out smooth beats and evanescent productions of both pop and cinematic quality. Both are well-read music lovers. They like to quote their inspirations, but their quotations are always sincere. They offer a wink to Motown (Woman), a look towards the solemnity of Pulp (à la This Is Hardcore), and a swim in ethereal soundscapes in the style of Pink Floyd while always remaining truthful to their identity. With frequent uses of reverbs, baritone guitars, analogical keys, indulgent and meticulous violins, and many refined melodies, Karen O and Danger Mouse have created the most elegant record of the moment. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
£10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 15, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

What an odd duo: On the left, the ex-singer of the garage band Yeah Yeah Yeahs. On the right, the second half of Gnarls Barkley, who managed to take some time off from the thousands of projects she is already involved with. Their collaboration gives birth to a series of vintage and sophisticated pop songs, enigmatic at first but ultimately fascinating. Laidback and melancholic, both sensual and opulent, Karen O’s voice has a dreamlike quality reminiscent of major singers from the 1960’s. Facing her, Brian Burton, aka Danger Mouse, pulls out smooth beats and evanescent productions of both pop and cinematic quality. Both are well-read music lovers. They like to quote their inspirations, but their quotations are always sincere. They offer a wink to Motown (Woman), a look towards the solemnity of Pulp (à la This Is Hardcore), and a swim in ethereal soundscapes in the style of Pink Floyd while always remaining truthful to their identity. With frequent uses of reverbs, baritone guitars, analogical keys, indulgent and meticulous violins, and many refined melodies, Karen O and Danger Mouse have created the most elegant record of the moment. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
£7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 9, 2014 | Cult Records, LLC

Karen O has always had a thriving career outside of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Most notably, her collaborations with Spike Jonze -- the Grammy-nominated music for 2009's Where the Wild Things Are and the Oscar-nominated "The Moon Song" from 2013's Her -- revealed her as a thoughtful solo artist with a range that went beyond her band's already eclectic music. While her official debut album, Crush Songs, a collection of lo-fi songs dating back to 2006, is far from showy, it continues in this witty, heartfelt, largely acoustic vein. There's a wonder and intimacy to the album that reaffirms why her music for Jonze's movies is so affecting; tracks such as "Ooo" and "King," a lullaby inspired by Michael Jackson, share that bittersweet whimsy. This playfulness extends to Crush Songs' deceptively simple arrangements. "Visits" boasts a rudimentary mechanical beat that sounds like a particularly rhythmic game of ping-pong, while "Body"'s percussion comes from clicking mouth noises that evoke wood blocks. O wrote Crush Songs when she felt like she might never love again, and its impressionistic glimpses, fragmented memories, and daydreams are more about possibilities than committing. The album's hissy sound quality underscores this tentative emotional state, and the shorter songs teeter between raw feelings and feeling unresolved; "Comes the Night" never quite coalesces, but "NYC Baby" captures yearning in just under a minute, and "Sunset Sun" is such a vivid portrait of a summer night, you can practically hear the crickets chirping. Not surprisingly, the album's more fully formed songs rival her previously released solo work. "Rapt" maintains Crush Songs' shy sweetness even as O puzzles over her tumbling emotions ("Love is soft/Love's a fucking bitch"); the chugging "Day Go By" could be an unplugged Yeah Yeah Yeahs song, and "Beast" distills the hopeless side of crushes in its eerie, timeless melody and veils of distorted backing vocals. Given that much of her previously released solo work is more accessible and more ambitious than this set, Crush Songs is a slightly strange choice for O's first full-fledged solo effort. Still, this unassuming musical diary showcases many of the best things about the music she makes on her own. ~ Heather Phares
£7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2015 | Cult Records, LLC

£0.59

Film Soundtracks - Released October 30, 2015 | Cult Records, LLC

£1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 16, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

£1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 11, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

£1.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 7, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

£1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

£1.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 30, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released February 10, 2015 | Cult Records, LLC

£0.59

Alternative & Indie - Released July 29, 2014 | Cult Records, LLC