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Electro - Released June 3, 2013 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Hi-Res Audio - Sélection du Mercury Prize
Between Insides and its follow-up Immunity, Jon Hopkins worked with King Creosote on the charming Diamond Mine, which set the Scottish singer/songwriter's ruminations to backdrops that were half rustic folk and half evocative washes of sound. Immunity isn't nearly as acoustic as that collaboration was, but its gently breezy feel lingers on several of these songs: "Breathe This Air" expands from a pounding house rhythm into a roomy piano meditation that recalls Max Richter as much as Diamond Mine, while the title track -- which happens to feature King Creosote's vocals -- closes the album on a whispery note. This feeling extends to the rest of the album in less obvious ways; Immunity is often a more blended, and more expansive-sounding work than Insides, particularly on songs like the Brian Eno-esque "Abandon Window" and "Form by Firelight," which offers a playful study in contrasts in the way it bunches into glitches and then unspools a peaceful piano melody. Some of Immunity's most impressive moments expand on the blend of rhythm and atmosphere Hopkins emphasized on Insides: "Collider" uses sighing vocals courtesy of Dark Horses' Lisa Elle as punctuation for almost imperceptibly shifting beats and a heavy bassline that helps the track build into a moody, elegant whole; meanwhile, the aptly named "Sun Harmonics" turns Elle's sighs into something angelic over the course of 12 serene minutes. Despite these highlights, the album still reflects how Hopkins' polished approach is something of a blessing and a curse. Immunity shows how he's grown, in his subtle, accomplished way, as a composer and producer, yet its tracks occasionally feel like the surroundings for a focal point that never arrives. Even if it doesn't always demand listeners' attention, Immunity is never less than thoughtfully crafted. ~ Heather Phares
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Electro - Released May 4, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Electro - Released May 3, 2009 | Double Six Records

Jon Hopkins got a pretty big résumé boost in 2008 through his production work (alongside Brian Eno and others) on Coldplay's Viva la Vida. Prior to this he had worked with Massive Attack and released two albums on small labels. His debut for Domino, 2009's Insides, is his first record that many people will hear and it's a promising, but flawed, debut. It shows that Hopkins has a firm grasp on many styles of electronic music but doesn't prove to be a master of any. He dips into ominously distorted gangsta glitch on the title track, lush big beat on "Wire," burbling orchestral dubstep on "Vessel," and icy cold IDM on "Colour Eye," and while each excursion sounds good, there is nothing much happening that a fan of electronic music in its many forms hasn't heard done better before. If there is an overriding aesthetic to Insides, it's the kind of ambient techno that labels like Instinct and artists like Pete Namlook and Irresistible Force were making in the early '90s. He creates acoustic instruments with synthesizers and programmed beats to create very pleasant, very well-crafted pieces that don't really challenge the listener but instead create a kind of warm, fuzzy blanket of sound for them to settle into. The problem many artists face who attempt this is that the end result comes awfully close to sounding like generic new agey music that drifts in one ear and out the other. While there are some tracks, like the overly subdued "The Low Places" and the beat-free songs that bookend the album ("The Wider Sun" and "Autumn Hill") that fall prey to this, mostly Hopkins' ear for a good melody and his willingness to occasionally dirty up the beats keep the album off of life support. The best song here, the sunny and bright, epic-length electro-ballad "Light Through the Veins," even points to a possible future where Hopkins develops a voice of his own and makes a record that breaks free of the genre exercises and half-formed ideas that may keep Insides from being a success. ~ Tim Sendra
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Electro - Released September 15, 2014 | Late Night Tales

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Electro - Released March 7, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 29, 2010 | Double Six Records

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Electro - Released November 10, 2014 | Domino Recording Co

When electronic musician and producer Jon Hopkins released Immunity in 2013, there was a noticeable change in his work. He continued his ever polished electronic productions, but he increasingly incorporated disjointed techno rhythms with the accompanying Eno-esque atmospherics. On Asleep Versions, Hopkins shuns the beats and focuses on work more suitable for bedtime listening -- hence the title -- than a club setting, with subtle and tranquil versions of four tracks also featured on Immunity. The recordings were made at the Sundlaugin Studio just outside of Reykjavik -- made famous by Sigur Rós -- and perhaps their ethereal and minimalist aesthetics rubbed off on him. The recording is made as one long 25-minute piece, its individual tracks blending into one another seamlessly with reverb trails at the end of each track running into the next. Asleep Versions presents a consistent feeling, with stripped-back tracks featuring short piano motifs and melodies on beds of almost holy vocals. The release of the first two singles, "Breathe the Air" and "We Disappear" (which include vocals from Purity Ring and Lulu James, respectively), between Asleep Versions and Immunity was perhaps a precursor of what was to come. When listening, those versions bring a different emotive feeling, with the vocals being the main focus and perhaps distracting from the original feelings within the music. There is a feeling throughout that, at points, these tracks are lacking somewhat from the impressive Immunity, finding yourself waiting for the shuffling rhythmic drums to kick in. That said, this EP is beautifully crafted and, once again, with fantastic production. ~ James Pearce
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House - Released June 30, 2001 | Just Music

"This attention to detail in Hopkin’s music creates an alluring humanity to his creations. As the definition of ‘Opalescent’ suggests, the emotion swings throughout record."
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House - Released June 20, 2010 | Just Music

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Ambient - Released September 30, 2016 | Just Music

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Electro - Released February 24, 2014 | Domino Recording Co

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Electro - Released November 10, 2014 | Domino Recording Co

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Electro - Released September 15, 2014 | Late Night Tales

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It would be an understatement to say that Jon Hopkins' career turned a corner between the release of his first mix album, The Art of Chill 2, and the release of his second one, a volume in the LateNightTales series. For starters, from late 2005 through early 2015, the producer/musician made albums with Brian Eno and King Creosote, composed music for a dance production and films, and released the well-regarded solo recordings Insides and Immunity. LateNightTales is Hopkins' first "proper" mix album since the tracks for The Art of Chill 2 were dealt to him. This time, Hopkins selected and mixed, and added his own touches, including piano and synthesizer, to enhance the continuous dream-like sequence. Even the contrasting consecutive picks -- like Darkstar's glistening, skyward "Hold Me Down" and Holy Other's dragging, alien "Yr Love" -- are compatible, their transitions made with ease. The majority of the mix is beatless and becalmed with periodic surges in energy that never startle. The Four Tet's "Gillie Amma, I Love You," drifting and hypnotizing with children's melodic whispers, is an ideal set-up for School of Seven Bells' bright-eyed, windswept dream pop. Hopkins inserts an exclusive of his own, a quiet, multi-piano cover of Yeasayer's "I Remember" that would highlight any ambient compilation released on Kranky, Kompakt, or Ghostly. Rick Holland, another Eno collaborator, provides the closing reading of a piece he wrote, which just happens to share its title with the Yeasayer original. ~ Andy Kellman
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Electro - Released June 30, 2014 | Domino Recording Co

Electro - Released April 25, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Pop/Rock - Released April 24, 2009 | Double Six Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 7, 2013 | JustMusic

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Electro - Released November 16, 2009 | Double Six Records

Electro - Released May 4, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Electro - Released April 22, 2013 | Domino Recording Co