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Country - Released February 20, 1975 | Atlantic Records

Folksinger John Prine sought to augment his spare accompaniment with his fourth release, COMMON SENSE. He reigned in the formidable Steve Cropper (of Stax-Volt fame) to sit in the producer's chair and the result was a noted departure from the minimal sound of his prior releases. Though the sweetened up sound offended more than a few purists at the time, any keen ear can detect that Prine has lost none of his flair. The title carries all the clever turns of phrase and imaginative wordplay fans have come to expect from Prine. Very few writers could pull off a song about Americans' cynicism and indifference towards their own country without actually sounding cynical themselves. Prine does just that before launching into the freewheeling "Come Back to Us Barbara Lewis Hare Krishna Beauregard," a hilarious tale of a hippie's fruitless search for nirvana. © TiVo
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Country - Released June 30, 1975 | Atlantic Records

Prine's third album is louder and more jaded than his first efforts, a set of rowdy country-rockers that tear along at a reckless speed. Sympathy takes a back seat to cynicism here, and while that strips the record of some depth, Prine's irreverence is consistently thrilling, making this one of his best. It's not as uniformly brilliant as the debut, but it did steer his music in a new direction -- where that record is often hallmarked for its rich sensitivity, Sweet Revenge established cynicism as Prine's dominant voice once and for all. Although he could still crank out a great ballad when he felt like it, from now on his records largely followed a more conventional rock & roll muse, a choice that eventually gained him more mainstream attention. "Please Don't Bury Me," "Christmas in Prison," "Blue Umbrella," and "A Good Time" are a few of the jewels on this one. © Jim Smith /TiVo
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Country - Released November 30, 1976 | Atlantic Records

Although later superseded by Rhino's Great Days anthology, Atlantic Records' compilation of John Prine's first four albums was good for its time, and became his only gold record. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released December 27, 1977 | Atlantic Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
A revelation upon its release, this album is now a collection of standards: "Illegal Smile," "Hello in There," "Sam Stone," "Donald and Lydia," and, of course, "Angel from Montgomery." Prine's music, a mixture of folk, rock, and country, is deceptively simple, like his pointed lyrics, and his easy vocal style adds a humorous edge that makes otherwise funny jokes downright hilarious. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released November 29, 1979 | Rhino - Elektra

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Country - Released October 30, 1980 | Rhino - Elektra

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Country - Released December 9, 1981 | Atlantic Records

John Prine's second album was a cut below his first, only because the debut was a classic and the followup was merely terrific. "Sour Grapes" showed Prine's cracked sense of humor and "Souvenirs" his sentiment. Even if it was the second rank of his writing, Diamonds in the Rough demonstrated that Prine had an enduring talent that wasn't exhausted by one great album. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1986 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released January 1, 1986 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Another straight country set, but unlike Sweet Revenge, this is a sleepy-town stroll, featuring snappy accompaniment by the New Grass Revival. After the terrific opening take on the Carter Family classic "Lulu Walls," the record glides along at a gentle tempo, yielding the clever "Let's Talk Dirty in Hawaiian" and one classic ballad, "Speed of the Sound of Loneliness," which was cut in a superb rendition by Nanci Griffith for her Other Voices, Other Rooms project. It also features "Linda Goes to Mars" and a re-recording of "Paradise" from Prine's debut. © John Floyd & Jim Smith /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1986 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

John Prine moved to his own independent label, Oh Boy, after stints at Atlantic and Asylum (later, he acquired his Asylum albums and reissued them on Oh Boy). On this label debut, he is under no commercial pressures, and that seems to make him more low-key. "The Oldest Baby in the World," "Somewhere Someone's Falling in Love," and "Unwed Fathers" are good examples of his new sweetness, which is as winning as his wit in his older songs. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released May 9, 1989 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released September 3, 1991 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 4, 1995 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 8, 1997 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released June 4, 1999 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released October 31, 2000 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 26, 2005 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 26, 2005 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 24, 2007 | Oh Boy Records

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Country - Released April 24, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic