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Film Soundtracks - Released August 1, 1990 | Epic - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2002 | Silva Screen Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 18, 2004 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 21, 1997 | Varese Sarabande

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Records

John Barry's best score for any James Bond movie -- including the best song ("We Have All the Time in the World") ever written for any movie in the series -- is reasonably well represented on this CD. Barry had already begun adding more diverse and complex orchestral pieces to his underscoring and greater lyricism to his songs with the preceding movie, You Only Live Twice, and he continued the process with On Her Majesty's Secret Service. The serious nature of its plot, however, and the unique mood of the movie, dictated that almost an entirely new score be devised: the brassy "007 Theme," which had appeared in three prior films, was absent, and the "James Bond Theme" was re-arranged. Barry also wrote one of his longest and most easily embellished action themes (heavily featuring the synthesizer, an instrument new to film scores), and dressed it up with a string section playing running scales that is startling to hear in stereo, with the discreet separation of the orchestral parts. And then there was "We Have All the Time in the World," the best song ever written for the Bond series; a serious, poignant love song that underscores the doomed romance between Bond and Tracy (Diana Rigg), it was sung by Louis Armstrong in what proved to be the jazz legend's final recording session. Astonishingly, the song was originally only a successful single in Italy, although it did become a hit in England 30 years later in connection with its use in a British television advertisement for Guinness. The music has since become one of the most popular elements of this film, which, with George Lazenby as its star, stands apart from both the Sean Connery and Roger Moore Bond movies. [On Her Majesty's Secret Service was reissued in 2003 with bonus tracks.] © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1977 | Columbia

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Pop - Released November 5, 2001 | Parlophone UK

Yet another John Barry compilation from EMI, this one built on his film and pop stylings alike, with a decided bias toward the latter. The John Barry Seven were one of the two top instrumental bands in England during the early/middle '60s, rivalling the Shadows, a fact brought home with the opening track here, their beautifully played cover of "Walk Don't Run." Vic Flick's guitar is worth the price of admission, even if the whole track sounds a bit cleaner than the textures achieved by the Ventures. "Beat for Beatniks," which follows, intersects with Barry's early film music, and in some respects -- principally the rhythm section -- anticipates his superb music for Anthony Harvey's Dutchman. "Blues for Beatniks" is exactly what its title indicates, a bluesy workout for guitar and tenor sax, with some bongos well forward in the mix. And "Cherry Pink and Appler Blossom White" shows off the band delivering pure pop, again with the kind of dexterity one expected from the Shadows, while "Hit and Miss" has a string section so vividly recorded and so far forward in the mix, it could easily fit onto an audiophile, "bachelors's den"-type collection -- especially when the electric guitar kicks in midway through. The makers have even slipped in one vocal number, "Keep a Walkin'," which is not bad in a Bobby Vee pop/rock manner. The producers have also extended the range of this CD up well past the JB7's history, to include Shirley Bassey's rendition of "Diamonds Are Forever," as well as the "James Bond Theme" (and "Goldfinger"), but most of the material here dates from the early '60s and the heyday of Barry's pre-motion picture career. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 1, 2014 | Silva Screen Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1980 | Varese Sarabande

This re-recording of John Barry's score for the 1980 Jeannot Szwarc romantic fantasy film is a bit of a puzzle, albeit a delightful one. Recorded in 20-bit digital audio by John Debney and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, this is the best account ever given of that score -- ironically, MCA/Universal, which distributes Varese Sarabande, also has out the original soundtrack as a full-priced item in its catalog, though the latter has never been upgraded from its late-'80s remastering and offers less music than is present here. Every section of Barry's music -- not just the vastly lyrical romantic passages, which are the obvious focus for most listeners -- is given a beautifully expansive reading. The darker sections, such as "June 27th," "Room 417," and "The Attic," benefit from the playing of the full-size symphony orchestra, which offers more virtuosity than the MCA pick-up orchestra could ever bring to this music. Edwin Paling's solo violin and Lynda Cochrane's piano also bring an optimal realization to the key musical moments in the original portions of the score, which the Rachmaninoff variation used as a key plot element. One is able to perceive, in this score as realized on this CD (especially on the track "A Day Together"), the rich and expansive internal orchestral language that Barry would employ to brilliant effect in his scoring of Dances With Wolves a decade later. © TiVo
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Soundtracks - Released February 20, 2012 | Silva Screen Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 1, 1967 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 1, 1990 | Epic

John Barry's fifth Oscar-winning score is a profoundly moving body of music, generally (though not entirely) elegiac in tone, very much like the movie for which it was written. It's also a bit of a mixed bag, occasionally falling back on material that will be familiar to fans of the James Bond movies that Barry scored during the early- to mid-'60s. The main title theme uses some of those devices -- dense, heavy string passages adjacent to trumpet calls -- but it is hardly representative of the full score. The real heart of Dances With Wolves is the pensive, tragic "John Dunbar Theme," which is far closer in spirit to Barry's music for Somewhere in Time or They Might Be Giants -- films (and scores) far removed from the Bond movies. It seems as though, when Barry is asked to write music for characters who are complex and troubled (Bond is neither), he delivers the goods in the guise of musical material that reflects those elements. Some elements familiar from the Bond films can be found scattered throughout this soundtrack, particularly in the violin-driven "stings" that open "The Death of Timmons" and the horn calls that herald its closing; in the string parts underneath the hyperactive percussion of "Pawnee Attack" that might've been lifted right out of From Russia With Love; and also in "Stands With a Fist Remembers," with its secondary violin part in the upper register of the strings. Much of Dances With Wolves, however, shows a broadening of Barry's sound -- he uses the vast canvas of Kevin Costner's movie and Dean Semler's cinematography as the basis for one of the most richly scored soundtracks of his career, working with one of the largest orchestras ever heard in one of his films; "Journey to Fort Sedgewick," "Kicking Bird's Gift," "Two Socks at Play," "The Death of Cisco," and "Journey to the Buffalo Killing Ground" have an almost Copland-like majesty about them, and "The Buffalo Hunt" is one of the finest pieces of music the man ever wrote. At times, it sounds as though Barry had every string and horn player in Los Angeles present, and topped it all out with an oversized percussion section, but none of the music or the scoring here sound excessive. Dances With Wolves was reissued with two bonus tracks in 1995. The 2004 reissue expanded some tracks and added still more material to present the soundtrack "in its entirety." © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 26, 1995 | Epic Soundtrax

Roland Joffé's much-maligned 1995 screen adaptation of the classic novel The Scarlet Letter was a disaster in virtually every facet of production -- after rejecting Elmer Bernstein's completed score, producers tapped Ennio Morriconeas his replacement , but when Morricone contributed a series of ill-fitting Mediterranean-flavored themes, yet another substitution proved necessary. Somewhat remarkably, the John Barry score that accompanied The Scarlet Letter in its theatrical release proved one of the final masterpieces of the composer's career -- a sweeping romantic tragedy rich in period detail and emotional intensity, it captures all the drama and gravitas to which the film so nakedly aspires. Written in an epic-scale orchestral mode recalling Barry's landmark Dances with Wolves, the music boasts a streak of malice and brutality heretofore absent from the composer's work -- tribal percussion further underscores the primal emotions at the heart of the book and the music. This is John Barry at his most visceral, and worth seeking out regardless of the film it accompanies. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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World - Released August 27, 2019 | RevOla

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 24, 1992 | Epic Soundtrax

John Barry specializes in lush, romantic, symphonic themes for big-budget motion pictures. Here, he conducts The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, playing a series of them, from Born Free to Dances-With Wolves. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1968 | Legacy Recordings

While many of the traditional Barry phrases and sonic textures can be heard throughout this score, there is no hint that the composer was resting on his laurels and doing a journeyman job. Rather, he chose to reach for new textures, inspired by plainchant and driven by the need to match the subtext in the film that involved the influence of the Catholic church on the lives and choices of the characters. Consequently, Barry's score shifts in the most fascinating way between regal fanfares and haunting chant, resulting in this score being possibly the best work Barry has ever done. The Legacy remastering does not add anything new, but the sound is considerably improved. © Steven McDonald /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1980 | Geffen*

John Barry played a big role in putting the James Bond movies on the map (and keeping them there), and he's scored everything from historical epics (Zulu, Dances with Wolves) to close-in two-person dramas (Dutchman). For many listeners, however, Somewhere in Time is his greatest film score, a gently romantic, lyrical idyll that contains some of his best string writing and his most subtle and compelling orchestral work prior to Dances with Wolves. Some of the darker thematic material on "Near the Lake" will even recall elements of his scoring for From Russia with Love, but nothing in that movie was as exquisitely drawn out as the long melodic line here. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 28, 1998 | Varese Sarabande

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1979 | Capitol Records