Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£9.99

Bebop - Released September 24, 2013 | HighNote Records

From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Jazz - Released March 1, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

Hi-Res
From
CD£13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Concord Records

Try to imagine the best Italian-American wedding you've every been to -- the people, the food, the style, the love -- then set it to some great jazz music, Joey DeFrancesco's Goodfellas. Add this killer band to your next wedding party and be prepared to have the time of your life. Plain and simple, this album is 55 minutes of unabated fun. Joey DeFrancesco (Hammond B-3 organ), Frank Vignola (guitar), and Joe Ascione (drums), three outstanding musicians who grew up in typical Italian-American families, play some of the music on which they were raised. Highlights abound on this brilliant concept piece: the kicked-up, jazzy "Volare," the groovy, tasty "Fly Me to the Moon," the energetic, rollicking "Malafemmena," and the beautiful slow dance "Young at Heart." Even Monk's "Evidence," taken at a blistering pace, is right at home in this setting. The Goodfellas wrote a couple of tunes for the occasion as well, none better than the bluesy, gutbucket title track. This band has big-time chops, and this music swings like mad. © Brian Bartolini /TiVo
From
CD£7.99

Bebop - Released October 20, 2009 | HighNote Records

"[B]oth of the album's original compositions, Bollenback's 'Songline' and DeFrancesco's 'Whichole,' are classic DeFrancesco trio: dazzlingly virtuosic, relentlessly rhythmic, intensely focused and soulfully sweet © TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Bebop - Released August 13, 2004 | HighNote Records

Frank Sinatra's repertoire (like that of Ella Fitzgerald) was so vast that when musicians or singers wish to pay tribute, they can choose almost any American popular song of 1930-1955 and it would fit. Organist Joey DeFrancesco plays nine well-known standards on this date, some of which are more closely associated with Sinatra than others. Actually, the Sinatra connection is basically irrelevant, for DeFrancesco swings in his usual fashion. Teamed with tenor saxophonist Houston Person (who is up for the challenge), guitarist Melvin Sparks, and drummer Byron Landham, DeFrancesco rips through a very uptempo version of "Pennies from Heaven," adds soul to "Teach Me Tonight," cooks on "What Now My Love," is relatively relaxed on "Don't Worry 'Bout Me," and duets with Person on a sensitive version of "Angel Eyes." As usual on a Joey DeFrancesco date, everything works. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Concord Records

Don't be fooled by the title. While Ballads and Blues may sound like a mellow batch of tunes to listen to while strolling in the park, the ever-soulful Joey DeFrancesco has something else in mind. The album takes off with "Get It All," a groovy piece of funk complete with Paul Bollenback's zesty guitar and Byron Landham's balanced backbeat. A steady, rocking groove also defines pieces like "Take the Coltrane" and "Jammin' in the Basement." The latter cut, in particular, emanates a good vibe, perhaps due to the presence of brother John DeFrancesco on guitar and Papa John DeFrancesco on a second B-3. Other guests include Pat Martino and saxophonist Gary Bartz on two tracks each. At least two pieces, "Home on the Range" and "Mama Don't Allow No," suggest that DeFrancesco has been hanging out with genre-bending guitarist Bill Frisell. And while soul-jazz renditions of folk songs may sound like a strange mix, every cut flows together in a lovely mesh of organ, guitar, and drums. DeFrancesco ends the album in a flourish by adding his smooth, rich vocals to "That's All." While his fans probably will not wait for a recommendation to pick up Ballads and Blues, everyone else will find the album a good introduction to organ music for the new millennium. © Ronnie D. Lankford Jr. /TiVo
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Mack Avenue Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Jazz - Released August 6, 2021 | Mack Avenue Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES£13.49
CD£8.99

Bebop - Released November 6, 2015 | HighNote Records

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD£7.99

Bebop - Released July 17, 2012 | HighNote Records

From
CD£11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Concord Records

Joey DeFrancesco the jazz organist meets Joey DeFrancesco the Sinatra-style crooner on this, his first vocal outing. The album is rich in contrasts: eight of the 13 cuts feature a big band, with the likes of bassist Ray Brown, tenor saxophonist Pete Christlieb, and more; the rest are trio pieces featuring the leader, Paul Bollenback, on guitar and Byron Landham on drums. Vocally, DeFrancesco pours it on with beaucoup reverb (producer John Burk and engineer Bernie Kirsh could have backed off a bit), handling swingers like "Mack the Knife" and ballads like "They Say It's Wonderful" with equal poise and conviction. His organ is present on many of the vocal tracks, but it moves to the fore on the three instrumental originals: "Mr. Dennis Houlihan," a fast rhythm changes tune; "Did You Hear Him Holler," a tongue-in-cheek Cajun groove; and "The Sidewalk Is Wild," a sly big band shuffle that features the leader briefly on trumpet. DeFrancesco also gives his voice a rest on the swing classic "One Mint Julep," the penultimate "Danny Boy," done as a powerful trio ballad, and the closing standard, "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You." DeFrancesco's vocal affect is quite similar to Sinatra's, especially on songs closely associated with him, like "In the Wee Small Hours," one of the all-around best selections. Some won't be able to get past the hammy aspect of the album, but the fact is that DeFrancesco really can sing, and "if you've got it, flaunt it" is a worthy credo for any performer. You've got to applaud him for taking the plunge. © David R. Adler /TiVo
From
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Mack Avenue Records

Hi-Res
From
CD£8.99
40

Bebop - Released September 13, 2011 | HighNote Records

"[I]ts keep-on-keeping-on vitality infects you. The middle of the program is especially strong..." © TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2003 | Summit Records

From
CD£13.49

Jazz - Released February 15, 2005 | Concord Jazz

Extending the good vibes created out of their first pairing on the live recording Incredible!, organists Joey Defrancesco and Jimmy Smith get down to business on Legacy. The two stellar and funky musicians have a great musical rapport and seem to really enjoy playing together. Fans of Incredible! will most likely find much to enjoy here. The album has a heavy Latin sound with percussionists Ramon Banda and Jose "Joey" de Leon supplying additional timbales and conga rhythms respectively. Also joining in this time around is special guest tenor saxophonist James Moody, who adds his fiery bop chops to "Jones'n for Elvin." Backing Defrancesco and Smith here are bassist Tony Banda, guitarist Paul Bollenback, and drummer Steve Ferrone. © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Bebop - Released September 14, 2010 | HighNote Records

Coming after his tribute to the iconic jazz pianist Horace Silver, Joey DeFrancesco's tribute to the music of Michael Jackson might seem something of a surprise, perhaps even exploitive as its release followed Jackson's death by just over a year. But for DeFrancesco it's always come down to the song -- which melodies might best suit his style, a cross between traditional and progressive -- and if anyone had a knack for a tune it was Michael Jackson. DeFrancesco -- who plays not only his usual Hammond B-3 but other organs, piano, and trumpet on the recording -- sticks largely to material from Jackson's solo career here, with an emphasis on Thriller (five of the nine songs), using the original song structures as takeoff points. DeFrancesco's interpretations reference Jackson's originals but depart from them substantially enough that they never feel like copies, and at times he and the band expand far outside of the basic chordal boundaries Jackson set down. More than anything, DeFrancesco appears to be having fun with this set (he even sings a couple). And when he and the band (guitarist Paul Bollenback is on fire) get cooking, as they do more often than not -- some of these tracks ("Billie Jean," "Rock with You," "Beat It") seriously rock -- it's hard not to get caught up in the party atmosphere. © Jeff Tamarkin /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Jazz - Released April 20, 2014 | Silverwolf

From
CD£8.49

Jazz - Released May 1, 1989 | Columbia - Legacy

Organist Joey DeFrancesco's debut as a leader would be impressive even if he had not been 17 at the time! DeFrancesco, whose sound has always been strongly influenced by Jimmy Smith (sounding like an exact duplicate on "All of Me"), is backed by an eight-piece horn section on two songs and a 16-piece string section on three others but more important to the music is the playing of guitarist Lou Volpe, drummer Buddy Williams and the electric bass of Alex Blake. Houston Person's tenor is also a strong asset on two of the eight numbers in a program that ranges from swing to more modern funk. A strong start to a colorful career. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Bebop - Released May 14, 1999 | HighNote Records

In a way, Joey DeFrancesco's entire career has been devoted to Jimmy Smith. Ever since he arrived in the late '80s, DeFrancesco was known for his dexterous assimilation of Smith's tasteful soul-jazz, and he expanded on that basic sound as the '90s progressed. It was likely just a matter of time before he sat down and recorded a full-fledged tribute to the Master of the Jazz Organ -- which is exactly what he did with Champ: Dedicated to Jimmy Smith. Working with bassist Randy Johnston and drummer Billy Hart, DeFrancesco keeps the spirit of Smith's classic Blue Note sessions alive, and Champ is indeed an expert emulation of that clean yet funky sound -- so much so that certain listeners may wonder what the point is and why not just listen to Smith's own albums. That's a valid complaint, since DeFrancesco rarely finds a voice of his own on this record, but the album itself is a good listen for that very reason. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Concord Records

Having reviewed some of Hammond organist Joey DeFrancesco's early albums on Columbia, then caught up with him again when he teamed up with the high-flying guitar acrobat Danny Gatton on Relentless, and then lost track of him, the word that comes to mind upon hearing this effort for Concord is "adult." DeFrancesco's earlier work was that of a young and precocious kid with a burning love of his instrument and something to prove. Fifteen years into what has become a celebrated career, he's settled in and is demonstrating the kind of taste and maturity that separates the flashy young hotshots from the serious musicians, the ones who will leave a legacy. On Organic Vibes, DeFrancesco goes beyond the traditional organ trio format that he has generally preferred up until now and is joined by a group that includes vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson and tenor sax player George Coleman, and his desire to give them the space they need leads him to move away somewhat from center stage; as a result, his solos are tighter, more focused, and less frenetic than they have sometimes been. There's also more of a focus on slower numbers than has often been the case on past DeFrancesco projects, an approach that bears sweet fruit on the group's tender rendition of "I Thought About You" and on the sauntering and funky "Down the Hatch." DeFrancesco's own "Colleen" is lovely bossa nova that ends the album on an almost contemplative note. Very highly recommended. © Rick Anderson /TiVo