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£13.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Lava Music - Republic Records

£20.99
£14.99

Pop - Released October 14, 2014 | Lava Music - Republic Records

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Though Jessie J's 2013 album Alive had several singles enter the U.K. Top 40, it did little in the U.S. J followed the rather bland, ballad-heavy set with Sweet Talker, a collection of songs tailored to regain her footing as a pop star in the States. At the very least, the album is a lot more energetic than the misleadingly named Alive: filled with cameos by American artists as well as collaborations with A-list producers, Sweet Talker is the flashy opposite of what came before it. Sometimes the too-much-is-never-enough approach actually works: "Bang Bang," the Max Martin-produced hit single that presented J, Ariana Grande, and Nicki Minaj as a saucy girl group for the 2010s, goes so over the top with pop fizz that it demands listeners' attention. While it's arguable that Minaj's mile-a-minute rapping and 2014's pop It Girl Grande steal the show from Jessie, "Bang Bang" did get her back on the charts and on people's minds in the U.S. The rest of Sweet Talker doesn't quite capitalize on that hit's sound or momentum; recorded in just three weeks, it finds J trying as many sounds and styles as possible in the hope that something will stick. The album's second single, "Burnin' Up," nods to rap via a cameo by 2 Chainz and to EDM with strobing synths; elsewhere, she returns to P!nk-esque pop on "Masterpiece" and "Said Too Much," a decent riff on "Blow Me (One Last Kiss)" and the brash attitude of her debut on "Ain't Been Done." Likewise, the album's ballads run the gamut from the pretty but repetitive "Personal" to the more overwrought territory of "Get Away" and "Fire," which ends up sounding more frantic than dramatic thanks to J's rushed delivery. A few moments on Sweet Talker balance the album's extremes: "Seal Me with a Kiss," which features De La Soul, channels "Bang Bang"'s sense of fun into playful retro-soul with hip-hop flair, while "Keep Us Together" opts for a more mature R&B pop sound that feels a lot less contrived than much of the album. While Sweet Talker's lack of a clear artistic voice makes it wildly uneven, it just might be loud enough to regain American listeners' attention. ~ Heather Phares
£18.99
£13.49

Ambient/New Age - Released October 26, 2018 | Republic Records

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R&B - Released May 22, 2018 | Republic Records

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Pop - Released July 29, 2014 | Lava Music - Republic Records

£5.49

R&B - Released May 23, 2018 | Republic Records

£5.49

R&B - Released May 25, 2018 | Republic Records

£17.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Lava Music - Republic Records

£5.49

R&B - Released May 24, 2018 | Republic Records

£3.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Lava Music

£13.49

Ambient/New Age - Released October 26, 2018 | Republic Records

Months after delivering her four-part R.O.S.E. album project, Jessie J indulged her love of the holidays with This Christmas Day, a collection of faithful renditions of beloved Christmas classics. Soothing and nostalgic, the 11-song set pairs big-band glitz and jazzy swing with a '90s R&B touch courtesy of producers Rodney "Darkchild" Jerkins, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, and Babyface, with additional glamour provided by David Foster on the show-tuney "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town" and the gentle-as-a-lullaby "Silent Night." In addition to contributing production on a pair of tracks, Babyface also brings his familiar vocals and sonic touches to "The Christmas Song." Boyz II Men also drop by to harmonize on "Winter Wonderland." Of the highlights, Jerkins assists on the best of the bunch, backing Jessie J with a choir and orchestra on the sweeping "White Christmas" -- which benefits from a horn section as well -- and "This Christmas Day," an uplifting gospel number that is one of the rare moments on this traditional Christmas album when J truly makes the song her own (the other being the "Jingle Bells" coda at the close of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"). As Christmas albums go, This Christmas Day benefits from Jessie J's powerful vocals and inspired arrangement from her team of iconic producers. Much like Kylie Minogue's Kylie Christmas or Mariah Carey's Merry Christmas, This Christmas Day is pleasant, wintry fun for pop fans in need of updated takes on songs they already know by heart. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
£1.49

R&B - Released January 26, 2018 | Lava Music - Republic Records

£6.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Lava Music

Shedding the severe black bob, lipstick and nail polish she sported on Who You Are in favor of a stripped-bare look, Jessie J looked as different as she possibly could on the cover of Alive. Musically, however, there isn't much of a change -- or rather, there are too many: she does nearly as much style-hopping on her second album as she did on her debut. A few of Alive's songs nod to her P!nk-meets-Natasha Bedingfield hit "Domino," such as the brassy opening track "It's My Party" and "Sexy Lady," which tries for an empowering vibe but is let down by a weak chorus. For most of the album, Jessie J tries to show how wide her range is; while she's capable of writing and singing introspective and rousing songs equally well, more often than not her versatility is more of a curse than a blessing. There are some whiplash changes here: she follows the charmingly retro electro-pop of "Daydreamin'" with "Excuse My Rude," a dubstep-tinged kiss-off that takes "Do It Like a Dude"'s brassiness in an even more abrasive and aggressive direction. Similarly, Alive's emotions swing wildly between bold and vulnerable, and J's vocals on the album's more reflective songs tend toward the overwrought. This is especially true of "I Miss Her," a ballad with a tender melody that could be beautiful if it weren't for the overdone singing. Elsewhere, Alive feels oddly generic; songs like the title track seem like they could be sung by anyone, for better or worse. The album's reliance on ballads is especially frustrating when J comes, well, alive on simpler and more direct moments like "Wild"'s dance-pop and "Conquer the World," a duet with Brandy that attains the heartfelt mood so many other tracks here fail to reach. For all the effort put into Alive, it doesn't provide a clear identity for Jessie J other than that of a talented singer/songwriter who's still searching for her signature sound. ~ Heather Phares
£15.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Lava Music

Shedding the severe black bob, lipstick and nail polish she sported on Who You Are in favor of a stripped-bare look, Jessie J looked as different as she possibly could on the cover of Alive. Musically, however, there isn't much of a change -- or rather, there are too many: she does nearly as much style-hopping on her second album as she did on her debut. A few of Alive's songs nod to her P!nk-meets-Natasha Bedingfield hit "Domino," such as the brassy opening track "It's My Party" and "Sexy Lady," which tries for an empowering vibe but is let down by a weak chorus. For most of the album, Jessie J tries to show how wide her range is; while she's capable of writing and singing introspective and rousing songs equally well, more often than not her versatility is more of a curse than a blessing. There are some whiplash changes here: she follows the charmingly retro electro-pop of "Daydreamin'" with "Excuse My Rude," a dubstep-tinged kiss-off that takes "Do It Like a Dude"'s brassiness in an even more abrasive and aggressive direction. Similarly, Alive's emotions swing wildly between bold and vulnerable, and J's vocals on the album's more reflective songs tend toward the overwrought. This is especially true of "I Miss Her," a ballad with a tender melody that could be beautiful if it weren't for the overdone singing. Elsewhere, Alive feels oddly generic; songs like the title track seem like they could be sung by anyone, for better or worse. The album's reliance on ballads is especially frustrating when J comes, well, alive on simpler and more direct moments like "Wild"'s dance-pop and "Conquer the World," a duet with Brandy that attains the heartfelt mood so many other tracks here fail to reach. For all the effort put into Alive, it doesn't provide a clear identity for Jessie J other than that of a talented singer/songwriter who's still searching for her signature sound. ~ Heather Phares
£12.49

Pop - Released October 14, 2014 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Though Jessie J's 2013 album Alive had several singles enter the U.K. Top 40, it did little in the U.S. J followed the rather bland, ballad-heavy set with Sweet Talker, a collection of songs tailored to regain her footing as a pop star in the States. At the very least, the album is a lot more energetic than the misleadingly named Alive: filled with cameos by American artists as well as collaborations with A-list producers, Sweet Talker is the flashy opposite of what came before it. Sometimes the too-much-is-never-enough approach actually works: "Bang Bang," the Max Martin-produced hit single that presented J, Ariana Grande, and Nicki Minaj as a saucy girl group for the 2010s, goes so over the top with pop fizz that it demands listeners' attention. While it's arguable that Minaj's mile-a-minute rapping and 2014's pop It Girl Grande steal the show from Jessie, "Bang Bang" did get her back on the charts and on people's minds in the U.S. The rest of Sweet Talker doesn't quite capitalize on that hit's sound or momentum; recorded in just three weeks, it finds J trying as many sounds and styles as possible in the hope that something will stick. The album's second single, "Burnin' Up," nods to rap via a cameo by 2 Chainz and to EDM with strobing synths; elsewhere, she returns to P!nk-esque pop on "Masterpiece" and "Said Too Much," a decent riff on "Blow Me (One Last Kiss)" and the brash attitude of her debut on "Ain't Been Done." Likewise, the album's ballads run the gamut from the pretty but repetitive "Personal" to the more overwrought territory of "Get Away" and "Fire," which ends up sounding more frantic than dramatic thanks to J's rushed delivery. A few moments on Sweet Talker balance the album's extremes: "Seal Me with a Kiss," which features De La Soul, channels "Bang Bang"'s sense of fun into playful retro-soul with hip-hop flair, while "Keep Us Together" opts for a more mature R&B pop sound that feels a lot less contrived than much of the album. While Sweet Talker's lack of a clear artistic voice makes it wildly uneven, it just might be loud enough to regain American listeners' attention. ~ Heather Phares
£3.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Lava Music - Republic Records

£1.49

R&B - Released August 24, 2018 | Republic Records

£2.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Lava Music

£17.49
£12.49

Pop - Released October 14, 2014 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Hi-Res
£14.99

Pop - Released October 14, 2014 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Though Jessie J's 2013 album Alive had several singles enter the U.K. Top 40, it did little in the U.S. J followed the rather bland, ballad-heavy set with Sweet Talker, a collection of songs tailored to regain her footing as a pop star in the States. At the very least, the album is a lot more energetic than the misleadingly named Alive: filled with cameos by American artists as well as collaborations with A-list producers, Sweet Talker is the flashy opposite of what came before it. Sometimes the too-much-is-never-enough approach actually works: "Bang Bang," the Max Martin-produced hit single that presented J, Ariana Grande, and Nicki Minaj as a saucy girl group for the 2010s, goes so over the top with pop fizz that it demands listeners' attention. While it's arguable that Minaj's mile-a-minute rapping and 2014's pop It Girl Grande steal the show from Jessie, "Bang Bang" did get her back on the charts and on people's minds in the U.S. The rest of Sweet Talker doesn't quite capitalize on that hit's sound or momentum; recorded in just three weeks, it finds J trying as many sounds and styles as possible in the hope that something will stick. The album's second single, "Burnin' Up," nods to rap via a cameo by 2 Chainz and to EDM with strobing synths; elsewhere, she returns to P!nk-esque pop on "Masterpiece" and "Said Too Much," a decent riff on "Blow Me (One Last Kiss)" and the brash attitude of her debut on "Ain't Been Done." Likewise, the album's ballads run the gamut from the pretty but repetitive "Personal" to the more overwrought territory of "Get Away" and "Fire," which ends up sounding more frantic than dramatic thanks to J's rushed delivery. A few moments on Sweet Talker balance the album's extremes: "Seal Me with a Kiss," which features De La Soul, channels "Bang Bang"'s sense of fun into playful retro-soul with hip-hop flair, while "Keep Us Together" opts for a more mature R&B pop sound that feels a lot less contrived than much of the album. While Sweet Talker's lack of a clear artistic voice makes it wildly uneven, it just might be loud enough to regain American listeners' attention. ~ Heather Phares