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Classical - Released August 29, 2006 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique
Some piano music is meant to be listened to, some piano music is meant to be played, and some piano music is meant to be listened to and played. Beethoven's piano sonatas are meant to be listened to -- and, for a few very talented pianists, to be played. Bach's Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach is meant to be played -- and, by piano teachers and kindhearted listeners, to be listened to. Brahms' late Klavierstücke are meant to be played and listened to -- provided the amateur pianist is good enough and his or her friends are indulgent enough. Bartók's Mikrokosmos are meant to be played -- and, every once and a while, to be listened to. They are, after all, the quintessential pedagogic pieces: 122 works arranged in order of difficulty over six books meant to engage, entertain, enlighten, and ultimately educate the budding pianist -- and no more meant to be listened to from end to end than Clementi's Gradus ad Parnassum. That doesn't mean there aren't beautiful and beguiling pieces inside the Mikrokosmos, there assuredly are, but it does mean that sitting down to listen straight through to 147 minutes and 37 seconds of Mikrokosmos is more than most people should be asked to do. That said, Jenö Jandó 2005 recording of Mikrokosmos is eminently listenable. Jandó is the Hungarian pianist and Naxos recording artist who has recorded vast swathes of the standard piano repertoire, but his heart remains in his home country of Bartóksylvania and his performances here are wholly idiomatic and totally sympathetic. Naturally, Jandó can play the notes -- anyone who can play Beethoven's piano sonatas can play Bartók's Mikrokosmos -- what is truly impressive is that he can find the music in the notes and express the art in the exercises. Although the argument could be made that the best way to listen to Mikrokosmos is to play Mikrokosmos, for those looking only to listen, Jandó's two-disc set is the inexpensive way to go. Naxos' sound is deep, but it could be clearer. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 6, 1997 | Naxos

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Classical - Released June 24, 2014 | Naxos Special Projects

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Classical - Released December 18, 1995 | Naxos

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Classical - Released May 27, 2008 | Naxos

Booklet
If you have ever had any curiosity as to what the piano music of German-Danish composer Friedrich Kuhlau sounds like, this Naxos disc will more than likely satisfy it. Containing the three Sonatas, Op. 59, and the three Sonatinas, Op. 20, in masterful performances by Hungarian pianist Jeno Jando, the disc will reveal a composer deeply indebted to the high classical style of Haydn and Mozart. While the Opus 59 Sonatas are in two movements each and the Opus 20 Sonatinas are in three movements each, they are uniformly light and delightfully lyrical works intended to instruct a player and entertain an audience. Jando, the same virtuoso who has already recorded the complete piano sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven for Naxos, turns in lively and stylish performances filled with bounce and buoyancy. For many, perhaps most, listeners brought up on the high classical style, Kuhlau's piano music may sound altogether too ephemeral; but if you already know the sonatas of Haydn and Mozart and are looking for something similar but not the same, Kuhlau may be just the ticket. Naxos' digital sound is clean and direct, but without much in the way of atmosphere. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 7, 1988 | Naxos

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Classical - Released February 11, 2001 | Naxos

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Classical - Released December 7, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
The Hungarian pianist Jeno Jando has issued performances of a great many pieces by Haydn, and the temptation is strong to pass by this collection of works that are obscure and, in several cases, cranked out at parties at Esterhaza castle. This would be a mistake, for there are real finds here. Among them is the opening Fantasia in C major, Hob. 17/4, which offers a splendid example of Haydn's attempts to exploit the sound of the new fortepiano, and has some striking uses of third relationships as well (sample and note the points at which the main theme returns in this sonata-like piece). Jando uses a modern piano, but he carefully distinguishes between the works from late in Haydn's career, where he creates a percussive, fortepiano-like effect, and the Five Variations in D major, Hob. 17/7, from very early in Haydn's career, where he emulates the original harpsichord with crisp, clean lines. The two sets of minuets, and the single group of German Dances and the Two Marches, Hob. 8/1-2 of 1795 were all occasional pieces. Jando takes all the minuets at the same tempo, which is justifiable in view of the ubiquitous "tempo di minuetto" marking in music of the time, and it seems possible that the music, arranged from a version for a small ensemble, was actually written for dancers. For the casual listener these may be a bit monotonous, but for the true Haydn lover, they will be seen as deep studies in register, harmony, and melodic shape. This is thus a nice find for good Haydn collections. Naxos' sound from the Phoenix Studio in Budapest is unusually good. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 7, 2017 | Unclassified

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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Naxos

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Classical - Released March 12, 1997 | Naxos

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Classical - Released January 10, 2020 | Naxos

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Naxos

Booklet
Naxos' hardest-working pianist, Jeno Jandó, tries his hand at Bach's Goldberg Variations, and the result is worth much more than the budget price of the disc. It would serve excellently as a neophyte's introduction to the masterpiece. He never adds more coloring than necessary, keeping closer to a Baroque interpretation throughout the Variations. Jandó's opening Aria is calm and has an elegant simplicity, followed by a lively Variation 1. Variation 7 is quite dance-like; 13 is soothing and songful, and 14 is brisk, almost reaching the lightning speed of Leonhardt's harpsichord recording of the same work. The Overture (Variation 16) is stately, but modest in sound, not brightly grandiose, which is partly due to the close sound of the recording. It picks up the depth of the piano's tone and softens the more brilliant variations somewhat. Jandó's articulation of the Overture makes it easy to imagine it as a Baroque orchestral piece. The canons are all clear and easy to follow, and there are excellent examples in Variations 26 and 28 of how two lines of music can have completely different characters, yet work together so well. The highlight of the performance is the Adagio, Variation 25. It is in the minor mode and could easily be played as a tortured soliloquy, but Jandó handles it gently, quietly, and pensively. Jandó has proven again why he is such a reliable musician and an asset to Naxos. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released May 29, 2007 | Naxos

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Concertos - Released April 1, 1990 | Naxos

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Classical - Released July 1, 1991 | Naxos

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Classical - Released January 18, 2004 | Naxos

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Naxos