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R&B - Released January 1, 1982 | A&M

As vocalist for the group L.T.D., Osborne's booming voice led hits like "Love Ballad," "Where Did We Go Wrong," and "Shine On." The group enjoyed constant success and offered a catalog of well-executed and classic albums including 1977's Something to Love and Togetherness from 1978. In 1982 it came as a complete shock when Osborne made his solo bid. Unlike countless other acts who did the same thing, his self-titled release proves that it was a great decision. Producer George Duke offered Osborne an up-to-the-minute sound with a collection of great studio players ranging from drummer Steve Ferrone to bassist Louis Johnson. That being said, a few of the tracks here don't play to Osborne's strengths as a committed and slightly quirky vocalist. "New Love" and "Eeenie Meenie" are so proficient yet by the numbers anyone could have sung them. The best tracks on this album give him the needed challenges that make him soar. The first single, the moody and rhythmic "Really Don't Need No Light," co-written by Osborne and David "Hawk" Wolinski, benefits from a string arrangement from George Del Barrio. The ballad "You Were Made to Love" not only perfectly captures Duke's uncluttered and precise production style, it also plays to Osborne's emotionality. The last track, "Congratulations," is a great tearjerker that has Osborne's reserve and intellect making it that much better. This is an impressive solo debut from one of R&B and pop's best vocalists. © Jason Elias /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1983 | A&M

At this point, some fans might have been hoping that Jeffrey Osborne would return to his former group, L.T.D.. If Jeffrey Osborne cast doubt on that proposition, Stay With Me Tonight made it so that even L.T.D. fanatics didn't want to see it happen. Unlike many R&B acts who either went solo and/or did pop-ish work, Osborne earned raves for retaining his quirky nature with his vocal inflections and ticks intact. The smooth, first single, "Don't You Get So Mad," picks up where Jeffrey Osborne and "I Really Don't Need No Light" left off. Osborne's best-sung up-tempo George Duke production, "Stay With Me Tonight," clicks from the synths and the Simmons drums to the off-center backing vocals. The best ballad from the album is also one of Osborne's strongest songs. With a strong string arrangement from George DelBarrio, "I'll Make Believe" has Osborne all but living the poignant lyrics and giving them more meaning by accenting the right words and phrases. "We're Going All the Way" is nearly as good. Tracks like "Other Side of the Coin," "When Are You Comin' Back," and "Two Wrongs Don't Make a Right" can't help but come off as filler given the excellent songs surrounding them. The best songs here more than make up for any so-so tracks and this is more than recommended. © Jason Elias /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 7, 2009 | eOne Music

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Soul - Released May 25, 2018 | Artistry Music

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Christmas Music - Released October 9, 2007 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released February 8, 2000 | Private Music

The great thing about adult contemporary music is that it provides a format for artists whose place on the pop charts in the '50s, '60s, '70s, and '80s was supplanted by the hip-hop and teenyboppers of the '90s and early '00s. Jeffrey Osborne is one such classic soul voice way past his prime but still cranking out appealing music that can't help but reach emotional depths because his voice is so rich, deep, and powerful. The tunes here are all slickly produced, from the cool and funky ode to love's second chance "2nd Time Around" to the dreamy ballad "That's for Sure." He's never been Barry White, but sexy funk ballads like "Come With Me" make perfect soundtracks to bedroom activities. Yet you can't get around the fact that, as strong as some of these tunes are, they pale next to the closing number, a live rendition of Osborne's first LTD hit "Love Ballad" -- which was also made famous by George Benson. The inclusion of this classic serves to remind new listeners that Osborne had a past; but longtime fans may feel a bit sad that none of his work on That's for Sure can approach his glories of the past. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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R&B - Released October 4, 2005 | eOne Music

Two years after the surprisingly modern-sounding Music Is Life, Jeffrey Osborne returned on From the Soul with a set of covers. His voice, understated but moving without exception, takes center stage throughout. The arrangements are straight-ahead, conservative, with no frills, and they all stream by at a leisurely pace. When backing most other voices, they'd run the risk of trying the patience of the average listener, but they're fine enough since they're supporting Osborne. The nicest touch of all is a sweet run through "All at Once," a song co-written by the singer that was made popular (roughly 20 years to the date) by Whitney Houston. Other highlights include Gamble/Huff's "Close the Door," Curtis Mayfield's "People Get Ready," and Barbara Mason's "Yes I'm Ready." © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released May 1, 1990 | Legacy Recordings

After such George Duke-produced R&B/pop hits on A&M as "On the Wings of Love" and "The Borderlines," Jeffrey Osborne's Arista debut, Only Human, was a return to more R&B-oriented material. Wisely, the LP's first single showcased Osborne's special way with a ballad. Produced by Barry J. Eastmond (Freddie Jackson), the halting, dusky "Only Human" was a Top Three R&B smash in late 1990. The singer shows his social consciousness side on the chugging "If My Brother's in Trouble," which was produced by Shep Pettibone and made it to number 11 R&B in the spring of 1991. The Osborne co-written ballad "The Morning After I Made Love to You" (also produced by Eastmond) at times generates the kind of shivers generated by some of his classics with L.T.D.. It was the album's third hit single, going to number 24 in the summer of 1991. There are successful flirtations with hip-hop on "Baby Wait a Minute" and a cover of the Roberta Flack hit "Feel Like Making Love" co-produced by Robert Brookins. While it could be argued that Osborne's A&M albums were generally "too pop," he seems absolutely regenerated on Only Human, digging his vocal chops into material that accommodates his extensive range. It's a head-scratcher as to why this is his only Arista release (one of his other sides for the label was the tasty Dionne Warwick duet "Love Power"); it would have been very interesting to hear Osborne continue in this mode. Some of the album's tracks are on the Hip-O CDs Love Songs, Ultimate Collection, and More of My Best. © Ed Hogan /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1988 | A&M

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R&B - Released June 10, 2003 | eOne Music

3 out of 5 - "...This is music for the club and the after-party - from a middle-aged singer who shows no signs of wear..." © TiVo
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Soul - Released April 13, 2018 | Artistry Music

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Soul - Released June 15, 2018 | Artistry Music

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