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Classical - Released January 17, 2020 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released September 23, 2013 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Solo Piano - Released October 26, 2018 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released February 15, 2019 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 28, 2003 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 25, 2005 | Warner Classics

In his piano concertos, Saint-Saëns sounds less like a late nineteenth century composer than like a Gallic Schumann, a composer of tuneful, virtuoso instrumental works that delight but rarely challenge. These warmly affectionate performances by pianist Jean-Philippe Collard with André Previn leading the Royal Philharmonic show them in their best light, showcasing their ephemeral beauty and fine craftsmanship, but thankfully not straining to find deeper meaning. EMI's remastering of the early digital originals is warmer but clearer and more detailed. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone (France)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 27, 2017 | La Dolce Volta

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Chamber Music - Released October 1, 2004 | Parlophone (France)

The playing of Jean-Philippe Collard has a lot to recommend it, particularly in the way it is so naturally expressive. On this EMI reissue of the solo piano works of Ravel, Collard's use of dynamics and pedal to color the mood and character of each piece never sounds forced or artificial, nor does he ever sacrifice momentum or expression. Among the ear-catching highlights are Miroirs, where Oiseaux tristes is as quietly beautiful as Alborada del gracioso is sparkling; and the Valses nobles et sentimentales, where the expression is intense and intimate, just as Ravel calls for in the performance markings. The Rigaudon of Le tombeau de Couperin is slower than most performers play it, which makes it stand out, but otherwise, it is just as communicative as the rest of the works. Collard does not make all of Ravel's works sound the same, but carefully tailors each one to make them speak eloquently. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 7, 2009 | Warner Classics

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Chamber Music - Released September 23, 2007 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 13, 2010 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 8, 2007 | Warner Classics

At first blush, this EMI Encore reissue of César Franck's Symphony in D minor and the Symphonic Variations may seem like a routine product, of interest only to cost-conscious collectors or neophytes; but experienced listeners will find this budget album to be much better than its uninspiring appearance and low price might suggest. The Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse is a capable orchestra, fully at home in French repertoire, and their playing of these masterworks is passionate and committed, with a feeling of warmth and openness that speaks of great affection for the music. In the wrong hands, the Symphony in D minor can sound clinical and cerebral or, paradoxically, maudlin and melodramatic, but under the firm direction of Michel Plasson, the intellectual and emotional aspects of the work are well-balanced and properly controlled so the music never sounds like a parody. The same restraint and poise are evident in the solid performance of the Symphonic Variations, also led by Plasson and featuring pianist Jean-Philippe Collard; the soloist and the orchestra are generously responsive to each other and their sensitivity prevents their frequent exchanges from sounding artificial or stiff. Perhaps the only negative aspect of the recording that warrants a comment is the slightly muted digital sound, which is less than ideal by contemporary standards, but a lot better than average for 1986, the date of these performances. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 13, 2010 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 25, 2005 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 1, 2007 | Warner Classics

Several recordings of Mozart's piano concertos accompanied only by a string quartet (or quintet) have appeared lately; this group of six, recorded in 1988, was one of the first. They are "authentic" inasmuch as the arrangements are Mozart's own, although his justification for doing them was that if he didn't, someone else would. One suspects that they are appearing now for the same reason they did in Mozart's day -- not everybody can afford to support a full orchestra. Annotator Jeremy Siepmann makes the refreshing admission that "no one could actually argue that the present concertos are actually improved by their reduction," and the loss throughout of Mozart's gorgeous wind writing is amplified in the Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K. 415, which includes trumpets and drums in the orchestra and loses a whole range of martial associations in this version. All this said, this vigorous French set stands out from other available versions for those who, again quoting Siepmann, desire to become "privileged eavesdroppers on domestic music-making." The Quatuor Muir and pianist Jean-Philippe Collard (he's anything but green) solve the problem of balancing a modern grand piano careening through bravura passageworks with a string quartet (the Muir does not, unlike some others who have taken on this repertoire, double the bottom line in the "orchestral" texture with a string bass). It is not so much that Collard reins in his sound -- although he does manage the trick of imparting real liveliness to his rhythms within a limited dynamic range -- as the quartet juices up its sound and quite artfully creates an effect very different and more commanding that that of an ordinary string quartet. Collard's piano doesn't seem to come out of anywhere when it enters, and in some of the music of more modest dimensions, notably the Piano Concerto No. 11 in F major, K. 413, you can almost forget about those missing winds. A good pick for these arrangements, which remain effective as background music for the same kinds of social gatherings in which they might have served in Mozart's day. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 15, 2019 | Warner Classics

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