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Classical - Released November 6, 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
And why not pair the Brahms Violin Concerto with Bartók? While the assembly is probably a first in the history of discography, it is true that Brahms and Bartók are of Hungarian descent - well, Brahms comes from Gypsy-Viennese origins rather than purely Hungarian traditions, but the heart is most certainly there - so too is that ever-present tendancy for ample melodic phrasing, so aptly captured by the violin where a piano simply falls short. Moreover, only thirty short years separate the two works: one for 1878, another in 1908... The Bartók Concerto comes with a story: the composer had offered it up as gift of a somewhat unrequited love to a young Stefi Geyer, who kept the score to her death, without ever playing it. Meanwhile, Bartók wrote another concerto thirty years later, at one time thought to be the one and only of its kind and genre. The "first" concerto was created in 1958 under the leadership of Paul Sacher. For this recording with Antonio Pappano, Dutch violinist Janine Jansen is completely at ease in the great concerto repertoire. Jansen plays a 1727 Stradivarius and brings great passion, emotion and skill to the world chamber music. The Brahms Concerto was recorded live in Rome in February 2015, the Bartók in London in August 2014. © SM / Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Even though violinist Janine Jansen appears alone in the cover photo of this 2012 Decca release, and her name is featured in large letters, no one should mistake this album as a solo effort. The recordings of Franz Schubert's String Quintet in C major and Arnold Schoenberg's sextet Verklärte Nacht are ensemble performances, and the musicians who play with Jansen form an artistic bond that seems utterly at odds with the star-oriented artwork. Jansen is certainly behind the choice of works, because they were programmed on her critically praised concert at Wigmore Hall. But beyond Decca's marketing decision emphasizing Jansen as the main performer, equal attention should be given to her colleagues, violinist Boris Brovtsyn, violists Amichai Grosz and Maxim Rysanov, and cellists Torleif Thedéen and Jens Peter Maintz, who are all comparable in technical skill and expressive abilities. The performance of Verklärte Nacht is impassioned and dark, and the richness of the lower strings contributes greatly to the nocturnal atmosphere of the piece. However, this is also a dynamic work, and Schoenberg's nearly orchestral counterpoint gives intense activity to all six players, with no single part standing out. Schubert's quintet is a trickier piece to get right, because the writing is exposed and transparent in virtually every area of the piece, so no one can get away with inferior playing. On balance, the Schoenberg shows the musicians as a cohesive team that can forge ahead, confronting dense textures and complex harmonies with a forward impetus that makes sense of the tone poem's turbulent emotional imagery, while the Schubert gives the musicians an opportunity to achieve sublime expressions of beauty and transcendence through their control and cooperation. Decca's sound is quite close-up, so practically everything is audible, including the breathing. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

It is highly unusual for a press release to be so frank in its description of the appeal of a particular performer. But in the case of Decca's 2006 release of Dutch violinist Janine Jansen's coupling of concertos by Mendelssohn and Bruch, the publicist's use of the terms "bedfellows" and "ménage á trois" all-too-plainly announces the prurient interest of Jansen's performances. Because while one may find her technique occasionally sloppy and her tone a bit sappy, there's no dismissing her ardent attacks, her warm vibrato, her frisky rhythms, and her seductive interpretations. In Jansen's performances, Mendelssohn's E minor Concerto is no sleek and stylish Audrey Hepburn, but rather a hot and bothered Marilyn Monroe, and Bruch's G minor Concerto is no sweet and sympathetic Myrna Loy, but rather a ready and willing May West. It should be acknowledged that conductor Riccardo Chailly is so smitten by Jansen that he leads the Gewandhaus Orchester in accompaniments bordering on the lascivious, that Decca is so beguiled by Jansen that its focus is almost entirely on the soloist at the expense of the orchestra, and that this combination only exaggerates the technical weaknesses of her performances at the expense the quality of the music. And it should likewise be admitted that the addition of Bruch's nearly unknown but utterly charming Romance for viola and orchestra will make this disc mandatory listening for fans of the composer's much more popular violin concertos and Scottish Fantasy. But unless style counts for more than substance, serious fans of this repertoire can do better. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Dutch violin virtuoso Janine Jansen turns her considerable talents to Impressionist and post-Romantic French repertoire in this album devoted to music evocative of the evening, night, and dreams. The recital includes the premiere recordings of three brief works by contemporary French composer Richard Dubugnon, and while they would not be mistaken for products of the early 20th century, their language and sensibility are very much linked to the works of Debussy, Fauré, Lili Boulanger, Messiaen, and Ravel that make up the rest of the album. Jansen has been a generalist, recording works from Vivaldi and Bach to Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Britten. French music has not been a large presence in her repertoire, although she played the premiere of Dubugnon's Violin Concerto, which he wrote for her. For the most part she avoids the wispiness that can afflict interpretations of "Impressionist" repertoire, a term Debussy hated. That delicacy is perfectly suited, however, to Heifetz's arrangement of Debussy's early song, Beau soir. She's entirely successful in Ravel's vigorous Sonata in G major, and she nicely captures the looseness of the music's vernacular elements. Dubugnon's character pieces are lyrical, lovely, and expertly scored. Pianist Itamar Golan provides a strong, nuanced, and idiomatically sensitive accompaniment. Decca's sound is clean and vivid. The closeness of the miking may be a problem for listeners who do not enjoy hearing a player's breathing as a significant performance element. The predictability of Jansen's sniffs as pickups to every phrase, with their volume a sure predictor of the intensity of the phrase, can wear very thin very quickly and mars an otherwise lovely performance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Violinist Janine Jansen and conductor Daniel Harding offer listeners Tchaikovsky's two most popular works in the violin repertoire. The Violin Concerto is often used by violinists for important debuts. Jansen performed it for her London debut, with conductor Vladimir Ashkenazy. This 2008 release on Decca features the concerto and of Tchaikovsky's Souvenir d'un lieu cher, in the violin and orchestra version. The concerto differs from other recordings in that Jansen is accompanied by the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, a smaller ensemble than typical. It should feel more intimate, yet Jansen is known for her fiery, passionate, and intense interpretations, and given the drama inherent in Tchaikovsky's music, it may not be as intimate as the listener expects. The setting, however, is more appropriate to the more modest and sentimental Souvenir, with its familiar, warm, lyrical final movement, "Mélodie." © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released November 6, 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet