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Funk - Released December 13, 2006 | Columbia

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Soul/Funk/R&B - Released March 31, 2017 | EMI

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As the title implies, Jamiroquai's eighth studio album, 2017's Automaton, is a dancefloor-friendly production inspired as much by lead singer Jay Kay's famous love of sports cars as Giorgio Moroder's synth and drum machine-heavy productions of the '70s and '80s. More broadly, the album also fits into Kay's fascination with the effect technology has both positively and negatively on our lives and on the planet (i.e., 1993's "Emergency on Planet Earth" and 1996's "Virtual Insanity"). Which is to say, this is pretty much the same album Kay has been making since at least 2001's A Funk Odyssey. Here, we get several catchy club-ready singles ("Automaton" and "Cloud 9") front-loaded with a handful of inventive album tracks designed for Kay to rock the European tour circuit. To those ends, Automaton works quite well, finding Kay in fluid vocal form and living up to his image as a global, time-traveling, playboy magic-man. Helping Kay conjure the funk magic this time is longtime keyboardist Matt Johnson, who co-produced and co-wrote much of the album. While previous outings found Jamiroquai evincing Moroder's slick robo-funk, Automaton is the closest they've come to making an outright Moroder-style album. Which means that the album plays well with the disco end of their output (think "Little L" or "Cosmic Girl"). In that sense, Automaton fits nicely alongside similarly inclined works like Daft Punk's own Moroder homage Random Access Memories and Two Door Cinema Club's Gameshow. With Kay's lithe croon at the center, cuts like the aforementioned "Cloud 9" and the steamy "Something About You'' are black-light dancefloor bangers full of pulsing synths, icicle-crisp guitars, and the occasional goosebump-inducing orchestral string flourish. Also infectious are tracks like the Rick James does '70s Europop number "Hot Property" and the humid disco anthem "Summer Girl," replete with a chorus of female backing singers. There are few bands who play classic disco-funk with as much genuine love for the genre and care in the productions as Kay and Jamiroquai. Ultimately, it's that sense of love and good vibes that drives much of Automaton. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 9, 1996 | Sony Music CG

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Pop - Released September 11, 2001 | Epic

After the jarring reception of 1999's Synkronized, Jamiroquai constructed A Funk Odyssey, something more polished and slick inside the band's own brand of funky disco-rock. Jason Kay and keyboardist/songwriter Toby Smith perfected a maturation that was left keyed in Travelling Without Moving but left open-ended on Synkronized for a wide scope of musical delight. A Funk Odyssey taps into various illustrious grooves of the Latin world, classic rock, and mainstream club culture, and Jamiroquai is tight and eager to make everyone shake their groove thing in their own light. The first single, "Little L," beams with Kajagoogoo-like synths while warping into a funk-driven hue of orchestral whirlpools, but Jamiroquai allows the band's extroverted and unattached personality to shine on the worldbeat-tinged "Corner of the Earth." Kay strips aside all disco humor and grandeur for something personally inviting, something that's heartfelt, too. A Funk Odyssey sparks classic enthusiasm, and it feels good. Dance music is not just a design, it's something far more tangible, and Jamiroquai surely captures a fierce desire to make it more emotional on the band's own level. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 8, 2013 | Sony Music UK

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Pop - Released October 17, 1994 | Sony Music UK

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Funk - Released April 30, 1999 | S2

Three years after their breakout Travelling Without Moving, Jamiroquai returned with another album that charts Jay Kay's continuing fascination with club-bound music of the 1970s -- from disco to jazz-funk to rare groove to later Motown -- but also shows signs of maturity. Produced by Kay with Al Stone, who also collaborated on Travelling Without Moving, the album includes several tracks (like the single "Canned Heat") that work infectious acid jazz grooves, and Kay's hipster vocals give out feel-good vibes through a set of ambiguously good-time lyrics. Though other tracks show a bit of an electronica update to the affairs, each still spotlights how strong and tight the band is. It may not be a leap ahead in sound, but Synkronized is another solid Jamiroquai record. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | EMI

Coming a half-decade after 2005's Dynamite, 2010's Rock Dust Light Star finds Jamiroquai and its frontman, Jay Kay, trying to re-ignite the funk machine by heading back to its rock and organic soul roots. In that sense, Rock Dust retains much of the black-light disco power that made such previous singles as "Little L" from 2001's A Funk Odyssey and "Feels Just Like it Should" from Dynamite such dancefloor burners. However, the album is a bit of a grower, with Kay evincing more of an interest in knotty, long-form funk numbers that take their sweet time to reach their inevitable, euphorically funky pop pinnacle. Nonetheless, Kay, having entered his forties, doesn't seem to be letting up on the disco gas -- nor the literal kind as the helicopter and Porsche-sploitation video for the funky slick single "White Knuckle Ride" proves. Still, Kay has revealed more of a passion for laid-back, acoustic guitar-driven tracks, and the mid-album ballad "Blue Skies" is perhaps the best one he's ever written. The more booty-minded faithful get a bevy of tracks including the aforementioned "White Knuckle Ride," as well as the Jazz Crusaders-sounding "Smoke and Mirrors" featuring a muscular saxophone solo outro. Elsewhere, Kay delves into the bluesy slow-burn acid rock of "Hurtin'," which takes its time to build to a wicked, soulful climax, and then the oft-headdressed singer goes all '80s robot-disco-funk on the Jaco Pastorius bass-inspired "She's a Fast Persuader." Ultimately, with the album's mix of horns, various percussion instruments, piano, and a general live-in-studio vibe combined with a mature "deep cut" songwriting approach, Rock Dust Light Star does bring to mind the more full-band sound of Jamiroquai's early acid jazz albums and goes a long way toward reestablishing Kay as a uniquely talented and legitimate heir to the '70s funk throne. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Funk - Released January 7, 2005 | Sony Music UK

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Pop - Released March 31, 2017 | EMI

As the title implies, Jamiroquai's eighth studio album, 2017's Automaton, is a dancefloor-friendly production inspired as much by lead singer Jay Kay's famous love of sports cars as Giorgio Moroder's synth and drum machine-heavy productions of the '70s and '80s. More broadly, the album also fits into Kay's fascination with the effect technology has both positively and negatively on our lives and on the planet (i.e., 1993's "Emergency on Planet Earth" and 1996's "Virtual Insanity"). Which is to say, this is pretty much the same album Kay has been making since at least 2001's A Funk Odyssey. Here, we get several catchy club-ready singles ("Automaton" and "Cloud 9") front-loaded with a handful of inventive album tracks designed for Kay to rock the European tour circuit. To those ends, Automaton works quite well, finding Kay in fluid vocal form and living up to his image as a global, time-traveling, playboy magic-man. Helping Kay conjure the funk magic this time is longtime keyboardist Matt Johnson, who co-produced and co-wrote much of the album. While previous outings found Jamiroquai evincing Moroder's slick robo-funk, Automaton is the closest they've come to making an outright Moroder-style album. Which means that the album plays well with the disco end of their output (think "Little L" or "Cosmic Girl"). In that sense, Automaton fits nicely alongside similarly inclined works like Daft Punk's own Moroder homage Random Access Memories and Two Door Cinema Club's Gameshow. With Kay's lithe croon at the center, cuts like the aforementioned "Cloud 9" and the steamy "Something About You'' are black-light dancefloor bangers full of pulsing synths, icicle-crisp guitars, and the occasional goosebump-inducing orchestral string flourish. Also infectious are tracks like the Rick James does '70s Europop number "Hot Property" and the humid disco anthem "Summer Girl," replete with a chorus of female backing singers. There are few bands who play classic disco-funk with as much genuine love for the genre and care in the productions as Kay and Jamiroquai. Ultimately, it's that sense of love and good vibes that drives much of Automaton. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | EMI

Coming a half-decade after 2005's Dynamite, 2010's Rock Dust Light Star finds Jamiroquai and its frontman, Jay Kay, trying to re-ignite the funk machine by heading back to its rock and organic soul roots. In that sense, Rock Dust retains much of the black-light disco power that made such previous singles as "Little L" from 2001's A Funk Odyssey and "Feels Just Like it Should" from Dynamite such dancefloor burners. However, the album is a bit of a grower, with Kay evincing more of an interest in knotty, long-form funk numbers that take their sweet time to reach their inevitable, euphorically funky pop pinnacle. Nonetheless, Kay, having entered his forties, doesn't seem to be letting up on the disco gas -- nor the literal kind as the helicopter and Porsche-sploitation video for the funky slick single "White Knuckle Ride" proves. Still, Kay has revealed more of a passion for laid-back, acoustic guitar-driven tracks, and the mid-album ballad "Blue Skies" is perhaps the best one he's ever written. The more booty-minded faithful get a bevy of tracks including the aforementioned "White Knuckle Ride," as well as the Jazz Crusaders-sounding "Smoke and Mirrors" featuring a muscular saxophone solo outro. Elsewhere, Kay delves into the bluesy slow-burn acid rock of "Hurtin'," which takes its time to build to a wicked, soulful climax, and then the oft-headdressed singer goes all '80s robot-disco-funk on the Jaco Pastorius bass-inspired "She's a Fast Persuader." Ultimately, with the album's mix of horns, various percussion instruments, piano, and a general live-in-studio vibe combined with a mature "deep cut" songwriting approach, Rock Dust Light Star does bring to mind the more full-band sound of Jamiroquai's early acid jazz albums and goes a long way toward reestablishing Kay as a uniquely talented and legitimate heir to the '70s funk throne. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 2, 2020 | Sony Music UK

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Pop - Released November 6, 2006 | Columbia

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Electronic - Released November 12, 2010 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released November 12, 2010 | Late Night Tales

Pop - Released June 13, 1998 | Sony Music CG

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Pop - Released March 3, 2017 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 14, 1997 | Work

Hailing from the same neo-R&B scene that spawned Soul II Soul and Brand New Heavies, Jamiroquai continues to filter '70s soul through a sieve of '90s acid jazz on its third album. Sounding remarkably like Stevie Wonder, singer Jason Kay's airy vocals float over fat basslines, disco rhythms, and lush strings on "Cosmic Girl." "High Times" takes more of a bottom-heavy, P-Funk-meets-the-EWF-horns approach. Other uptempo jams include "Use the Force," with its Afro-Cuban beat, and the equally funky, scratch-laden title track. Jamiroquai's eclectic bag of influences includes reggae (the loping "Drifting Along") and world music. Two instrumentals center on the otherworldly sounds of a didgeridoo. "Didjerama" is an ambient track that accentuates the instrument's hollow timbre with chirping birds and assorted percussion. "Didjital Vibrations" is quiet storm music. An unlisted drum-n-bass collaboration with M-Beat, "Do You Know Where You're Coming From," wraps up this vibrant package of Brit-soul. © TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1992 | Columbia

Jamiroquai made a large initial splash in 1993 with Emergency on Planet Earth, a psychedelic melange of tight funky rhythms, acid rock intimations, and '70s soul melodies. Frontman Jay Kay introduces himself with an environmentally oriented manifesto inside the sleeve, and his lyrics smack of idealist save the planet revolution. But this revolution would be held on the dancefloor if the band's impressive rhythm section had anything to say about it. Horns, string arrangements, and a didgeridoo provide full texture on most of the album's tunes, and the socially aware party vibe raged into the U.K.'s number one album slot. For a debut, Emergency shows quite a range of diversity, from the up-tempo jazzy instrumental "Music of the Mind" to the stop-start funk of "Whatever It Is, I Just Can't Stop." © Troy Carpenter /TiVo
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Funk - Released April 15, 2005 | Sony Music UK