Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£0.79

Pop - Released July 25, 2003 | Woah Dad!

CD£7.99

R&B - Released September 24, 2007 | Woah Dad!

Sometimes a greatest-hits collection can signal the end of an artist's career, summing up what has come before, and sometimes it can even revive a flagging artist's career whose previous albums might not have met expectations. And sometimes it can just come too early in a career to have any determining features. Jamelia had been around for seven years at the time of the release of Superstar: The Hits, so it could not be argued that it was too soon for a hits collection. Unfortunately, with just 11 tracks total -- two from her first album Drama, five from her breakthrough success Thank You, her four Top Ten singles, some of the most commercial pop hits from the mid-2000s in "Superstar," "Thank You," and "See It in a Boy's Eyes," and three singles from her previous album, Walk with Me, including her sampled songs "Beware of the Dog" and "No More," both dominated by their background samples ("Personal Jesus" and "Golden Brown," respectively) -- it doesn't even cover her entire output of singles, mysteriously omitting her first hit, "I Do," and another of her early singles, "Boy Next Door," As Jamelia had only had 12 hits at this point of her career, one of them being the double A-side (if they were actually still referred to as that in 2004) "DJ" with "Stop," the latter her version of the Sam Brown hit which hadn't previously been on an album, and with less than 40 minutes of music on the CD, there was plenty of room for either a little experimentation with some new tracks, or a little more adventure than simply compiling all the singles onto one album, the best of which had been on a big seller (Thank You) not long before. There wasn't even any new artwork or photos of the singer, but soon after the release of Superstar: The Hits, Jamelia was released from her contract at Parlophone and the reason for the release became obvious. This compilation became her weakest seller yet, even worse than her debut album when she was almost unknown, and spent just one week in the chart at number 55. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
CD£0.79

Dance - Released September 12, 2003 | Woah Dad!

CD£7.99

Pop - Released June 30, 2003 | Woah Dad!

The music industry isn't exactly known for its patience. A flop single, an underperforming album, or a lackluster comeback is sometimes all it takes for an artist to be dropped and never heard from again. Birmingham-born Jamelia has had all three during her short four-year career (three of her seven singles have failed to reach the U.K. Top 30 and debut album Drama sank without a trace), and yet somehow she's still here. The faith invested in her by her record company is admirable in this fickle day and age, but with her second album, Thank You, it's been totally justified. Taking two years off to raise her daughter, the MOBO Award winner has obviously used the time well, raising her game to produce a record bursting with potential singles. While partly influenced by the U.S. production sound of the moment, Thank You, unlike countless other U.K. R&B albums, never forgets its roots, either. So the Neptunes-alike production of the title track, a female empowerment anthem about domestic violence, sits comfortably alongside "Off da Endz," a frenetic grime duet with So Solid Crew's Asher D, as does "Cutie," featuring a Kanye West-style helium-voiced chorus, next to the grinding dirty basslines of "Taxi," written by Alisha's Attic's Karen Poole. Indeed, the best track here is quintessentially British and a masterstroke in fusing R&B with the modern rock establishment. "See It in a Boy's Eyes," written by Coldplay's Chris Martin, is a beautiful, slinky piano-driven ode to understanding the opposite sex. It's one of the best things Martin has done, but it's also the most blatant indication of how Jamelia has matured as an artist. She's just as at ease when she moves outside her comfort zone. "Superstar," the single that rescued her career, was originally a hit for Denmark's Christine Milton, but Jamelia makes it her own to produce a simple but effective pop classic, while final track "Antidote," a haunting, quirky ballad smothered in a glossy electronica production, promises a bolder, different direction for the future. Overall, Thank You is a confident, imaginative record that oozes with personality and should be a lesson to record companies everywhere that patience can sometimes reap the biggest rewards. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
CD£7.99

R&B - Released July 27, 2009 | Woah Dad!

CD£7.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2003 | Woah Dad!

The music industry isn't exactly known for its patience. A flop single, an underperforming album, or a lackluster comeback is sometimes all it takes for an artist to be dropped and never heard from again. Birmingham-born Jamelia has had all three during her short four-year career (three of her seven singles have failed to reach the U.K. Top 30 and debut album Drama sank without a trace), and yet somehow she's still here. The faith invested in her by her record company is admirable in this fickle day and age, but with her second album, Thank You, it's been totally justified. Taking two years off to raise her daughter, the MOBO Award winner has obviously used the time well, raising her game to produce a record bursting with potential singles. While partly influenced by the U.S. production sound of the moment, Thank You, unlike countless other U.K. R&B albums, never forgets its roots, either. So the Neptunes-alike production of the title track, a female empowerment anthem about domestic violence, sits comfortably alongside "Off da Endz," a frenetic grime duet with So Solid Crew's Asher D, as does "Cutie," featuring a Kanye West-style helium-voiced chorus, next to the grinding dirty basslines of "Taxi," written by Alisha's Attic's Karen Poole. Indeed, the best track here is quintessentially British and a masterstroke in fusing R&B with the modern rock establishment. "See It in a Boy's Eyes," written by Coldplay's Chris Martin, is a beautiful, slinky piano-driven ode to understanding the opposite sex. It's one of the best things Martin has done, but it's also the most blatant indication of how Jamelia has matured as an artist. She's just as at ease when she moves outside her comfort zone. "Superstar," the single that rescued her career, was originally a hit for Denmark's Christine Milton, but Jamelia makes it her own to produce a simple but effective pop classic, while final track "Antidote," a haunting, quirky ballad smothered in a glossy electronica production, promises a bolder, different direction for the future. Overall, Thank You is a confident, imaginative record that oozes with personality and should be a lesson to record companies everywhere that patience can sometimes reap the biggest rewards. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
CD£1.19

Soul - Released October 29, 2004 | Woah Dad!

CD£0.79

Pop - Released October 29, 2004 | Woah Dad!

CD£7.99

Pop - Released June 26, 2000 | Woah Dad!

CD£7.99

Pop - Released August 21, 2006 | Woah Dad!

Hopes were high for Jamelia's third album, Walk with Me, released in September 2006 almost three years after her previous album, Thank You, but the expected sales didn't really materialize, Walk with Me peaking at number 20 and spending just five weeks on the chart. Thank You had needed two bites of the cherry, appearing to fail miserably upon release, spending just two weeks in the chart and peaking at number 65 but enjoying a new lease on life throughout 2004 thanks to four Top Ten singles "Superstar," "Thank You," "See It in a Boy's Eyes," and "DJ." Walk with Me also included two further Top Ten hits, the opening track, "Something About You" and "Beware of the Dog," which sampled Depeche Mode's "Personal Jesus," turning the track into more of a rock song than an R&B one, which didn't really suit Jamelia's voice. The next single, "No More," did more than sample the Stranglers' "Golden Brown" and played it as was on the original all the way through the song: it was a strange choice of sample, as it was so dominant that one found oneself listening to the background rather than the song and singing along to "Golden Brown." "Do Me Right" was a collaboration with Afrika Bambaataa but one would think it was influenced by Talvin Singh rather than a hip-hop pioneer as it sounded very eastern. "Window Shopping" also featured a sample but that was a particularly silly one of Molly Sugden as Mrs. Slocombe from the TV sitcom Are You Being Served, injecting the catch-phrase "Are you free." The album lost its way a little in the middle as "La La Love," "Go," and "Get Up, Get Out" are rather insipid, chugging mid-tempo ballads, and then it's back to R&B-soul on "Got It so Good." The album closed with "Hustle," a Latin-grooved dance track that did exactly what you would expect, and a good way to end an album, leaving the audience wanting more. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
CD£0.79

Pop - Released July 9, 2004 | Woah Dad!

CD£0.79
DJ

Pop - Released September 3, 2004 | Woah Dad!

CD£2.39

Dance - Released November 9, 2007 | Woah Dad!

CD£7.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2006 | Woah Dad!

Hopes were high for Jamelia's third album, Walk with Me, released in September 2006 almost three years after her previous album, Thank You, but the expected sales didn't really materialize, Walk with Me peaking at number 20 and spending just five weeks on the chart. Thank You had needed two bites of the cherry, appearing to fail miserably upon release, spending just two weeks in the chart and peaking at number 65 but enjoying a new lease on life throughout 2004 thanks to four Top Ten singles "Superstar," "Thank You," "See It in a Boy's Eyes," and "DJ." Walk with Me also included two further Top Ten hits, the opening track, "Something About You" and "Beware of the Dog," which sampled Depeche Mode's "Personal Jesus," turning the track into more of a rock song than an R&B one, which didn't really suit Jamelia's voice. The next single, "No More," did more than sample the Stranglers' "Golden Brown" and played it as was on the original all the way through the song: it was a strange choice of sample, as it was so dominant that one found oneself listening to the background rather than the song and singing along to "Golden Brown." "Do Me Right" was a collaboration with Afrika Bambaataa but one would think it was influenced by Talvin Singh rather than a hip-hop pioneer as it sounded very eastern. "Window Shopping" also featured a sample but that was a particularly silly one of Molly Sugden as Mrs. Slocombe from the TV sitcom Are You Being Served, injecting the catch-phrase "Are you free." The album lost its way a little in the middle as "La La Love," "Go," and "Get Up, Get Out" are rather insipid, chugging mid-tempo ballads, and then it's back to R&B-soul on "Got It so Good." The album closed with "Hustle," a Latin-grooved dance track that did exactly what you would expect, and a good way to end an album, leaving the audience wanting more. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
CD£0.79

Pop - Released August 25, 2006 | Woah Dad!

CD£1.19

Pop - Released September 5, 2006 | Woah Dad!

CD£0.79

R&B - Released July 16, 2004 | Woah Dad!

CD£0.79

Pop - Released September 8, 2006 | Woah Dad!

CD£0.59

Pop - Released September 8, 2006 | Woah Dad!

CD£0.79

Dance - Released December 1, 2006 | Woah Dad!