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Albums

£16.19

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Documents

£11.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2009 | History

£11.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2008 | Documents

£11.99

Jazz - Released May 31, 2011 | CoolNote

£11.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2008 | Documents

£11.99

Jazz - Released August 21, 1996 | Arbors Records

£11.99

Jazz - Released February 1, 2015 | Bethlehem Records

£7.99£11.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | Verve

Trombonist Jack Teagarden's Verve recordings, his last batch of studio sides, have tended to be underrated. Teagarden was actually still in prime form up until the time of his unexpected death in early 1964. For this set, his sextet (which also includes trumpeter Don Goldie, clarinetist Henry Cuesta, pianist Don Ewell, bassist Stan Puls, and drummer Barrett Deems) mostly performs obscurities. Teagarden sings a couple of charming Willard Robison songs ("Don't Tell a Man About His Woman" and "Peaceful Valley"), Ewell is featured on "Froggie Moore Blues," organist Shay Torrent sits in on an unusual version of "Love Lies," and Goldie is showcased on "Afternoon in August." Other songs include "I Don't Want to Miss Mississippi," "It's All in Your Mind," and "Mis'ry and the Blues." The only Dixieland standards performed are "Basin Street Blues" and "Original Dixieland One-Step." Whether taking trombone solos or singing, Teagarden sounds inspired by the fresh material throughout. ~ Scott Yanow
£8.79

Jazz - Released June 22, 2018 | Jazzsential

£8.63

Symphonic Music - Released February 26, 2016 | Giggling Gecko

In the years between leaving Louis Armstrong's All-Stars and his death (1952-1963), the great trombonist and singer Jack Teagarden led a Dixieland-oriented sextet. Most of his recordings during that time period, while quite worthy, featured the usual standards and swing songs that had been associated with Teagarden since the '30s. But this particular project, which in 1998 was reissued as a limited-edition CD, was something quite different. Willard Robison was an unusual composer whose nostalgic and wistful songs usually extolled the virtues of country life; best-known among his tunes are "Old Folks," "Cottage for Sale," and "Tain't So, Honey Tain't So." For what would be his next-to-last album in January, 1962, he recorded ten Robison songs (plus the slightly out of place non-Robison standard "Where Are You") while backed by a string orchestra that included both a harp and his trumpeter Don Goldie. Bob Brookmeyer and Russ Case contributed all but one arrangement, and although the strings were certainly not necessary (since they do not add much to the music), the prestigious setting must have pleased the trombonist. All of the songs except for "I'm a Fool About My Mama" have vocals by Teagarden, and he puts plenty of restrained feeling into such obscure tunes as "Guess I'll Go Back Home This Summer," "Think Well of Me," and "'Round My Old Deserted Farm." His short solos are often quite exquisite, and this often touching, somewhat rare date is one of the strongest of his final period. ~ Scott Yanow
£7.89

Jazz - Released May 1, 2016 | SINETONE AMR

£7.99

Jazz - Released December 26, 2006 | Epm

£7.89

Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released August 30, 2011 | SINETONE AMR

Trombonist Jack Teagarden's Verve recordings, his last batch of studio sides, have tended to be underrated. Teagarden was actually still in prime form up until the time of his unexpected death in early 1964. For this set, his sextet (which also includes trumpeter Don Goldie, clarinetist Henry Cuesta, pianist Don Ewell, bassist Stan Puls, and drummer Barrett Deems) mostly performs obscurities. Teagarden sings a couple of charming Willard Robison songs ("Don't Tell a Man About His Woman" and "Peaceful Valley"), Ewell is featured on "Froggie Moore Blues," organist Shay Torrent sits in on an unusual version of "Love Lies," and Goldie is showcased on "Afternoon in August." Other songs include "I Don't Want to Miss Mississippi," "It's All in Your Mind," and "Mis'ry and the Blues." The only Dixieland standards performed are "Basin Street Blues" and "Original Dixieland One-Step." Whether taking trombone solos or singing, Teagarden sounds inspired by the fresh material throughout. ~ Scott Yanow
£7.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Retrospective

ASV/Living Era almost always does it right, sonically, musically, chronologically. This double-disc set by Jack Teagarden, putting together two absolutely packed discs of material ranging from 1928-1954, is a serious case in point. Here Teagarden is showcased leading his own mighty bands and playing in the company of the Louis Armstrong All-Stars, Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Red Nichols, Artie Shaw, Pee Wee Russell, Eddie Lang, Bunny Berigan, Joe Venuti, Frankie Trumbauer, Gene Krupa, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, and many, many more. The sound quality on these 46 cuts is exceptional considering the many sources they were compiled from, and the tune selection is out of this world, including one particularly poignant read of "St. James Infirmary" featuring the Armstrong band with T on vocals -- and a trombone solo. Simply put, it's killer, with Teagarden at his very best. There are many fine moments, but this is jazz blues at its purest and most haunted. This collection will serve as an exciting end piece for collectors, but more importantly as a fitting and gem-filled introduction for the curious. Teagarden was perhaps the greatest white blues singer in history, and this collection goes a long, long way to making that case. ~ Thom Jurek
£7.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | CoolNote

£7.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2005 | Documents

£7.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | CoolNote

£7.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2009 | Documents

£7.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | CoolNote

£7.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 2008 | Documents