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Classical - Released September 25, 2015 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released February 5, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 1, 2019 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
Regarded as one of the finest interpreters of classical and romantic repertoire, Imogen Cooper is internationally renowned for her virtuosity and lyricism. This recording is her sixth release on Chandos Records, following earlier discs of works by Liszt, Wagner, Brahms, Chopin, and Robert and Clara Schumann. Imogen Cooper writes: ‘Beethoven’s "Diabelli Variations" are rightly considered to be among the greatest works for solo piano ever composed, by Beethoven or anyone else. It is incontrovertible that there is not one superfluous note in this huge masterpiece – each variation is flawless in construction and imagination, and in depth of characterisation. The breadth of ideas is limitless. Each variation tells a whole story, and for all that some are connected in mood, it is no mean feat as a performer to respect the huge scope of Beethoven’s vision.’ Imogen Cooper plays a Steinway Model D, and was recorded in the concert Hall at Snape Maltings, Suffolk. © Chandos
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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 1, 2006 | Avie Records

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Classical - Released November 9, 2010 | Avie Records

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Classical - Released April 5, 2013 | Australian Broadcasting Corp (ABC)

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Classical - Released April 28, 2009 | Avie Records

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Classical - Released November 3, 2009 | Avie Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Wigmore Hall Live

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Classical - Released March 17, 2017 | Chandos

Booklet
Richard Wagner is often cited as the chief innovator of chromatic harmony in late Romantic music, mostly because of his tonally ambiguous Prelude to Tristan und Isolde. Yet the strongest influence on Wagner's harmonic ideas came from Franz Liszt, who ventured further afield than Wagner dared to go. Imogen Cooper's 2017 release on Chandos explores a group of piano works by Liszt, as well as the transcription of Wagner's Prelude to Tristan und Isolde by Zoltán Kocsis, and Liszt's arrangement of the Liebestod, and the program demonstrates the use of unresolved dissonances to create atmosphere and heighten tension. Compare Liszt's Nuages gris with Wagner's Elegie to hear the similarity of approach, and sample La lugubre gondola I and the Bagatelle sans tonalité to hear Liszt go to the far edge of tonality. Somewhat subtler in effect are the Valse Oubliée No. 2, Gretchen (transcribed by Liszt from his Faust Symphony), and the Four Pieces from Années de Pélerinage, Deuxième Année: Italie, which still reflect conventional tonality but share the ambiguity of the rest of the pieces in their subtle use of chromaticism and harmonic coloration. Cooper's playing is suitably delicate and restrained, and she avoids Liszt's flashier displays of virtuosity to emphasize his reflective and darker side. Chandos' recording is clear and reasonably close, with natural resonance.
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Classical - Released June 3, 2016 | Chandos

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 4, 1988 | Ottavo

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Classical - Released May 11, 2010 | Avie Records

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Classical - Released January 27, 2015 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
Recordings comparing the music of Robert and Clara Schumann have become fairly common, but this fine outing from English pianist Imogen Cooper is unusually to the point. There are only two works by Clara, but each connects in a specific way with a work by Robert that's adjacent on the program, and the result is a set of pieces that gives a real feeling for the nature of their creative and romantic collaboration. Most striking is the similarity of the themes in Clara's "Le Ballet des Revenants," the fourth of her Quatre Pièces caractéristiques, Op. 5, and the second theme of the first movement in Robert's Piano Sonata, Op. 11. It's too close to be coincidental, and the only question is who came up with it first. As annotator Nicholas Marston notes, the Sonata, a difficult and still not terribly common item on recitals today, was thought unwieldy and overly ornate in its own time, including by the young Clara, who certainly had the chops to handle it. It's tempting although hardly presumptive to hear the insertion of this theme as Robert's response to her critique. At any rate, the Sonata gains a bit of clarity with this peg to hang one's perceptions on. Clara's "Romance in B major" (track seven) makes a good sample for the album. It's linked (although not as closely as in the other case) to the preceding "Romanze" of Robert, and is indeed both more formally complex and more emotionally ambitious. The program opens with a very fine performance by Cooper of the set of Humoreske, Op. 20, of Robert Schumann: she catches the tough, capricious, unpredictable quality of the music. Excellent Chandos sound from the Snape Maltings Concert Hall rounds out a superior package.
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Classical - Released September 1, 1989 | Ottavo

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Classical - Released April 22, 1988 | Ottavo

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Classical - Released March 22, 1991 | Ottavo

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Classical - Released October 2, 1987 | Ottavo

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Classical - Released June 3, 2016 | Chandos