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Chamber Music - Released December 22, 2017 | Claves Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Violin Concertos - Released April 21, 2017 | Orchid Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Precisely the year John Adams was born, 1947, none else than Heifetz premiered Korngold’s Violin Concerto which star-violinist Ilya Gringolts plays on this Album, together with Adams’ own Concerto written 1993. Stylistically, these two works are polar opposites, but with a common emphasis on melody – and a common rejection of the ascendancy of atonality and serial techniques. John Adams is a composer who does not like to be pinned down. Being branded a minimalist has not suited him any better than did the confines of his training in the twelve-tone system while he was a student at Harvard. The term itself is a bit of a misnomer, and one might prefer the term “Pattern and Process” music, which highlights the tendency of these composers to set patterns in motion within dense, rhythmically complex textures, and then gradually morph these patterns over time. In the case of his Violin Concerto, the metamorphoses are so subtle that it is well-nigh impossible to trace any repetitive principle whatever, even though it is present. As for Korngold’s Violin Concerto, it might also be called “hypermelodic”. The composer himself noted that the concerto, “with its many melodic and lyric episodes, was contemplated rather for a Caruso of the violin than for a Paganini.” Written at a time in music history where atonality held nearly undisputed sway in musically sophisticated circles (Korngold’s music is emphatically tonal, if harmonically complex), the work was the first in what Korngold hoped would be his triumphant return to concert music, after a long and celebrated career as Hollywood’s preeminent film composer. The piece contains material in each of its three movements from several of Korngold’s film scores; but it would have been a pity indeed to waste such exquisite melodies to a mere movie, and self-recycling of good materials has been around for centuries, even Bach himself being a great self-recycler, an irrefutable role-modem. (c) SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 18, 2010 | Aeon

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released July 7, 2017 | BIS

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Like any prodigy -- especially a protégé of Itzhak Perlman -- Ilya Gringolts demonstrates phenomenal technique, great expressive control, and a flair for the dramatic, qualities expected of any young violinist who wants to stay ahead of the competition. Yet Gringolts also has a knack for interesting program choices, extending beyond the mere recycling of the obligatory concertos, and he offers much more than polished rehashes. Yes, the popular Violin Concerto in D minor by Sibelius is here, and Gringolts plays it with passion, meticulous articulation, brilliant color, and a sharp edge that keeps him at the forefront of the orchestra at all times. However, Sibelius' Concerto comes last on this disc in the knowledge that it is the main attraction and sure to be found. To get that payoff, though, the listener must first encounter the underplayed but fascinating Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major by Prokofiev. This gorgeous work needs greater exposure in the west, and Gringolts takes delight in promoting it up front. His vigor in the Vivacissimo is impressive, and his playing in the lyrical outer movements is soaring and quite beautiful. Neeme Järvi and the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra provide sturdy accompaniment in both concertos, and Deutsche Grammophon's clear recording accounts for every note.
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Classical - Released July 8, 2016 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics