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Jazz - Released November 14, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released August 26, 1970 | CBS Associated

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Jazz - Released October 5, 2010 | Masterworks Jazz

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released February 20, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

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Jazz - Released April 19, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

This two-fer from Collectables features a pair of LPs by jazz flutist Hubert Laws: The Laws of Jazz and Flute By-Laws, both of which were originally released on Atlantic in 1966 -- although the recordings occurred over nearly two years, with the former recorded in April 1964 and the latter spanning August 1965, September 1965, and February 1966. Among the 14 cuts are "Bessie's Blues," "Bloodshot," "No You'd Better Not," "Strange Girl" and "Baila Cinderella." These albums are worth acquiring for any fan of straight-ahead jazz. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 14, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released October 31, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released November 18, 1980 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released November 11, 1978 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released October 31, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1972 | Epic

Long before Wynton decided he could play classical chops as well as the real long-haired interpreters, even though he was a jazz musician, Hubert Laws and his partners at CTI gave it a run with a jazz twist, and for the most part with a far more adventurous repertoire. Unfortunately, the results were just about as thrilling as Wynton's, with a few notable exceptions. For whatever reason, flutist Hubert Laws, known for his soul-jazz deftness, decided to take on handful of classical texts with the help of Bob James on piano, harpsichord, and electric piano; bassist Ron Carter, who doubles on cello; and drummer Jack DeJohnette, along with percussionists Airto and David Friedman, a pair of classical guitarists, and a trio of bassoonists. The program ranges from Debussy's lovely "Syrinx" and Faure's "Pavane," to Stravinsky on the title cut and two movements of the third Brandberg Concerto by Bach. The problem with so much variation and ambition is that it's bound to get caught up somewhere. That catching place is in the articulation of the actual transcriptions. They are stiff, rigid, oddly intoned, and lackluster -- except in Debussy's "Syrinx," which is gorgeous throughout with its strange meter and lilting cadence. On the rest, the only place the tunes work is in the sections where the players engage in jazz improvisation upon the score, which is a swirling, engaging free-for-all of color, texture, and nuance. But since this happens so irregularly, the pieces just seem to grate on the listener. This is a brave but ultimately failed experiment. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 31, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Jazz - Released March 9, 2004 | Savoy

The legendary flutist returns to the contemporary jazz fold in an era when the type of sexy cool soul-jazz he recorded on CTI in the '70s (earning three Grammy nominations in the process) is now considered retro and hip. Even with some incredibly fresh new material, magnificently wistful playing, and his grand legacy in tow, he might have trouble getting the flute onto the smooth jazz format. But his new label gives him a great shot at it, helping him along first on the title cut with Chris Botti's subtle trumpet and Fattburger guitarist Evan Marks' best wah-wah clicks. Even with those luminaries and lush backing vocals, Laws' sultry flute gymnastics stand out. "Bloodshot" sounds like the kind of dreamy funk-jazz he did in the '70s, helped along here by the keyboard punch of Jeff Lorber, who also traverses both eras. And speaking of hip, on "Summer '75" Laws picks up the piccolo for a higher-tone melody over the bouncy moods of smooth jazz star Brian Culbertson's Wurlitzer and Rhodes. Another guest sure to help in the marketing of the legend's new era is Herbie Hancock, an old CTI labelmate who charms on acoustic piano on the midtempo "Nighttime Daydream." Ironically, as strong as those tracks are, Laws does just fine with a core trio of David Budway (piano), John Leftwich (bass), and Ralph Penland (drums) throughout the rest of the disc. "Stinky" is all speedy chops, while "Malibu" offers more of Laws' laid-back side. A marvelous night, indeed. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 22, 1990 | Contemporary Jazz Masters

Some of Hubert Laws' more commercial recordings left much to be desired, but at his best, he's been a highly imaginative soloist who can play jazz, classical and R&B equally well. A fine overview of his CTI efforts of the early to-mid-'70s, The Best of Hubert Laws is an eclectic and unpredictable CD that finds him offering adventurous interpretations of everything from John Coltrane's "Moment's Notice" to classical pieces by Stravinsky ("The Rite of Spring") and Bach ("Allegro from Concerto #3 in D"). While an NAC/smooth jazz artist would play a mindless, note-for-note cover of Maria Muldaur's "Midnight at the Oasis," the flutist insightfully transforms the 1974 pop hit into gritty jazz-funk. Electric keyboardist Bob James performs some excellent solos, which expose and underscore the vacuous and shallow nature of his subsequent work. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1994 | MusicMasters

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Jazz - Released August 19, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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Jazz - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Lounge - Released January 1, 1994 | MusicMasters

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Stardust Records

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Jazz - Released November 14, 2014 | Legacy Recordings