Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£13.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique - 9 de Classica-Répertoire
HI-RES£10.99£17.49(37%)
CD£7.99£12.49(36%)

Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£10.49£17.49(40%)
CD£7.49£12.49(40%)

Classical - Released November 18, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Classical - Released October 18, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Hélène Grimaud's 2010 album Resonances has a program with a unifying theme, though some explaining is needed to tease it out of the music. All of the works presented on this CD are notable products of the musical heritage of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and the connections Grimaud makes go backward in time to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, then pass through Franz Liszt to Alban Berg and Béla Bartók. While the Classical, Romantic, and modernist styles exhibited here are strikingly different from each other -- and the average listener shouldn't be expected to find much in common with Mozart's Sonata in A minor; Berg's Sonata, Op. 1; Liszt's Sonata in B minor; and Bartók's Romanian Folk Dances -- Grimaud nonetheless contends that lines can be drawn through the cultures, languages, and musical expressions of eastern Europe that influenced all these composers. Beyond this broad theme, the playing is characteristic of Grimaud -- impetuous, brooding, and vigorous, but above all passionate and showy -- so the listener may care less about the ideas justifying her selections when actually hearing her volatile performances. Grimaud is at her best in the Berg and Liszt sonatas, and her elastic rubato is quite effective in these moody works. Her manner of delivery is less attuned to Mozart's precise music, which needs tighter control and less rushing, or to Bartók's charming vignettes, which seem almost tossed off here. While some mental leaps are required to follow the album's thesis, expressed in liner notes adapted from an interview, fans of this virtuoso pianist will draw the direct conclusion that the music is all that matters, and give Grimaud their undivided attention. Others, however, may find the album a mixed lot. © TiVo
CD£11.99

Classical - Released January 24, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Solo Piano - Released September 21, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Music has been described as a way of saving that which has been lost: a simple but strong idea, and one which has influenced Hélène Grimaud's artistic expression.Her new album Memory deals with music's power to bring back to life the images of the past in the present, its ability to vividly and piercingly evoke a specific time and a place. It explores the essence of memory through a series of refined miniatures for piano. The choice of repertoire covers a vast, diverse range, from the reveries of Chopin and Debussy to the timeless, folky melodies of Valentin Silvestrov.  © Universal
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
HI-RES£10.99£17.49(37%)
CD£7.99£12.49(36%)

Classical - Released January 29, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
With the aptly-named Water, Hélène Grimaud probes the strength and beauty of H20, the most precious gift of nature, and a source of fascination for the pianist. Produced by Nitin Sawhney, who appears more regularly on the electro scene, here he has especially emphasized the fascination that water has inspired in many composers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This idea not only led to this record, it also resulted in a project of the Grimaud with Scottish artist Douglas Gordon, previous winner of the Turner Prize: a concert-installation entitled Tears Become ... designed specifically for the exercise room of a former military building in New York's Park Avenue Armory. Performed in December 2014, this show mixes visual art, music and architecture, and has at its center the "Water" programme of Hélène Grimaud. Before she starts playing, the gigantic hall was gradually flooded to give the impression of a huge "water field" (in the words of Gordon), which eventually encircled the piano concert. Nine composers are represented on the album which opens with Berio's Wasserklavier ("aquatic Piano"). Rain Tree Sketch II by Takemitsu, the Fifth Barcarolle by Fauré, Ravel's Jeux d'eau, Almería Iberia by Albéniz, the Liszt's Jeux d’eau à la Villa d’Este, the Andante Dans les brumes of Janáček and Debussy's La Cathédrale engloutie. These pages were recorded live during the New York concert-installation and then linked together by seven Transitions written and recorded by Nitin Sawhney. Finally, with Water, Hélène Grimaud brought together in a unique way her twin passions for music and the environment...
CD£20.49

Keyboard Concertos - Released July 3, 2006 | Warner Classics International

CD£13.49

Classical - Released April 7, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
This double-disc survey of Hélène Grimaud's recordings on Deutsche Grammophon presents high points of her career from 2004 to 2016 and samples a large repertoire that runs from Bach to Bartók. Grimaud's performance style, or the general perception of it, has been characterized by fluid tempos and lots of rubato, free use of dynamics, and passionate expressions, which give the impression of an excessively romantic personality. Yet Grimaud is more complex in her interpretations, and this collection covers aspects of her playing that are perhaps at odds with the received wisdom. In sampling the opening tracks, listeners may find that Grimaud's Bach is surprisingly wiry and resilient, her Beethoven is full-blooded, and her Bartók is whimsical and playful. Continuing through the track list, one encounters more surprises, such as her crisp Mozart, her internalized Chopin, her richly shaded Brahms, and so on, all running counter to the notion that Grimaud is one kind of pianist. The album's title, Perspectives, suggests that Grimaud has considered her subjects from many angles, and that her personality is subsumed by the music, in the moment, not arbitrarily forced through a single point of view. Grimaud has been at the top of her profession long enough to deserve this carefully considered retrospective, and it demonstrates aspects of her art that a less varied or narrower selection would conceal. © TiVo
CD£2.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Denon

CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Central to Hélène Grimaud's first live album for Deutsche Grammophon is the significance she finds in the slow movement of the Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major, K. 488, of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. This movement is a touchstone for her, insofar as she regards it as the most sublime music, "where you find the real Mozart." She has also stated, "Even if this movement were all we had, that would be enough." Because of the emphasis Grimaud places on this poignant Adagio in F sharp minor, listeners may be tempted to cut to the chase and skip the other tracks to hear her interpretation. But to get the full impact and intent of her Mozart, listen from the beginning of this album. The Piano Concerto No. 19 in F major, K. 459, opens the disc, and is followed by the Recitative and Rondo, K. 505, from Idomeneo, performed by guest soprano Mojca Erdmann. Grimaud's playing and conducting of the Bavarian Radio Chamber Orchestra are brisk and boisterous, and her approach is direct and energetic, as fans have experienced in her many recordings of Romantic repertoire. She saves her most expressive playing for the Allegretto of K. 459, which is an amiable diversion, and the above-mentioned Adagio of K. 488, which in Grimaud's hands is a dark and troubling exploration of the soul. Note: the cadenzas in K. 459 are Mozart's, but the first movement cadenza of K. 488 is by Ferruccio Busoni. © TiVo
CD£2.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Denon

CD£11.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hélène Grimaud's performances on this disc -- a coupling of Beethoven "Emperor" Piano Concerto with his Piano Sonata in A major, Op. 101 -- are truly fantastic. Her technique is essentially untouchable and her tone is surprisingly colorful. And, as in her previous recordings, her interpretations are outrageous. With Vladimir Jurowski and the Dresden Staatskapelle in the Concerto, Grimaud is unafraid to do whatever she wants with balance and tempos. And alone in the Sonata, she is even more audacious, bending, shaping, sculpting the music with no restraint applied except her own taste. And, while there is no guarantee that Grimaud's tastes will suit your own, you owe it to yourself to hear and judge for yourself. One might have thought Beethoven's strongly architectural music wouldn't be susceptible to such blandishment. But Grimaud's willfulness matches the composer's own broad streak of ornery individuality, and her sensual shapes and malleable tempos do the same. Jurowski gets the Dresden Staatskapelle to follow where Grimaud leads in the Concerto, and the results in both cases are perhaps the most persuasive recording of the pianist's career. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is exceptional. © TiVo
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hélène Grimaud applies her virtuoso strength and particular sense of expression to the second piano sonatas of Chopin and Rachmaninov in this 2005 recording. The idea of a life story is often attached to Chopin's Sonata No. 2 because the character of each movement seems to paint the picture of an energetic hero, who is tragically mourned at death in the third movement Marche funèbre. In a way, as Grimaud sees it, Rachmaninov's Piano Sonata No. 2 is also about life and death. Rachmaninov stripped material out of his original 1913 version -- the overall mood of which she calls being "mired in darkness" -- to create a more compact and sharply defined sonata in 1931. Grimaud has restored certain passages that she felt added to the emotional story of the work. These two major and well-known works are not pretty piano pieces, and in her hands, while there are tender moments, the main thrust of them is the vitality -- and often the grand size -- of the Romantic spirit that is found in life and, at least here, continues after death in a transformed state. The conclusion of the program with Chopin's Barcarolle and Berceuse -- played by Grimaud with a unique, but not unpleasant, way of phrasing the music -- follows that idea of transcendence of spirit. © TiVo
CD£13.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Denon

CD£11.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

CD£10.99

Classical - Released April 6, 2018 | Warner Classics

CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

CD£11.99

Classical - Released September 28, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
On the surface, there's nothing too innovative about this release from French pianist Hélène Grimaud: the music, with the exception of the two Bagatelles, Op. 1 of Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov and the final Breathing Light of pianist-composer Nitin Sawhney, is all familiar, and the interview-style annotations with Grimaud, although the name of Heidegger is dropped, are pretty general in their evocation of the age-old association between music and memory. The surprise, then, is that when you get down to the actual performance, it's quite fresh. Grimaud says that she rarely plays this music in recital, but you'd never know it: sample her reading of the ubiquitous Gymnopédie No. 1 of Satie, which is shadowy, deliberate, and indeed like a memory partially obscured. And this points to the strength of the program, which leads you down the corridors of memory. The placement of the two Silvestrov pieces near the beginning with the elegant Arabesque No. 1 of Debussy sets the mood, and the rest of the music goes deeper into the theme. Most of the music is by Chopin, Debussy, and Satie, covering a timespan that itself embodies the memory theme: the Satie pieces, in Grimaud's hands, take on an almost psychological flavor, while Chopin is a reminiscence of temps perdu. The church acoustic was chosen by Grimaud herself; in the hands of a lesser pianist, it would have been simply murky, but she exploits it to the hilt. Highly recommended. © TiVo