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CD£14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

Distinctions 5/6 de Magic - Pitchfork: Best New Music
There is nothing cool about Haim's music, and that's why it's so refreshing. While many of their contemporaries engaged in a contest to find the most obscure influences, and '80s revivalists sucked synth-pop and new wave dry, the Haim sisters dug up the decade's biggest, poppiest sounds and fashioned a captivating debut album out of them. Days Are Gone sounds all the more unusual precisely because it's so mainstream; a list of their influences -- Stevie Nicks, Phil Collins, En Vogue, Shania Twain -- looks like a glance at the Top 40 from about 25 years before the album's release. Likewise, these songs revel in that era's sometimes-cheesy flourishes without a trace of irony, and the gated drums, gleaming synths, and muted guitars that dominate Days Are Gone haven't sounded so good since their original heyday. Not that Haim's approach is unstudied; the trio obviously did their homework to revive and embody these sounds so perfectly, and it took them five years of recording and re-recording these songs until they had just the right mix of smoothness and immediacy. The hard work paid off: Days Are Gone is full of should-be hits like "The Wire," which boasts a big, fist-pumping beat and sassy guitar licks (they can only be called that). Compared to the thin voices of so many 2010s pop stars, singer Danielle Haim's rich alto only adds to the group's throwback feel, but like her sisters, she's remarkably versatile. Over the course of the album, Haim captures and explores the nuances within the styles they're reviving: there's the sweet soft rock of "Honey & I" or "Don't Save Me," the title track's tight synth-pop, and the dark, driving territory of "Let Me Go" and "My Song 5," which, with its slinky melody and hard-hitting beats, makes the most of the trio's much-touted R&B influences. This song, along with much of Days Are Gone, features production by Ariel Rechtshaid, whose work with Usher and Vampire Weekend proves he has the breadth to help Haim unite their ideas into a coherent sound. Still, it's the writing that ultimately prevents Days Are Gone from being just an extremely accurate exercise in nostalgia. The best moments here, such as the bookends "Falling" and "Running If You Call My Name," would be great pop songs regardless of when they sound like they're from. A debut album that could pass for a greatest-hits collection, Days Are Gone will provide musical comfort food for some, and possibly an introduction to irony-free pop for others. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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CD£13.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 26, 2020 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
The third album by the Haim sisters (Este, Alana and Danielle) is by far their best and most intimate. They skilfully mix a range of influences: pop, rock, R&B and even a hint of jazz through their use of brass, one example being the sax used on the opening track dedicated to their hometown Los Angeles (where they also criticise New York for its greyness…). This album comes out just at the right time, crowing a successful period that saw the three sisters headline the fourteenth Pitchfork Festival in Chicago in March 2019 alongside Robyn and the Isley Brothers. Danielle also featured on Vampire Weekend’s fourth album (Father of the Bride) and the Haim trio’s latest single appeared on October 30, 2019, announcing the album’s release (Now I’m In It). It was a song that seemed to be made for the mainstream, despite its lyrics that deal with depression, and was accompanied by a music video directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, the director of Boogie Nights and There Will Be Blood. Women in Music Pt. III is a truly endearing record that contains some beautiful moments such as the sunny Hallelujah or the bitter sweet Summer Girl that brings to mind the likes of Joni Mitchell and Fleetwood Mac, both artists that are adored by the Californian trio. © Yan Céh/Qobuz
CD£12.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
There is nothing cool about Haim's music, and that's why it's so refreshing. While many of their contemporaries engaged in a contest to find the most obscure influences, and '80s revivalists sucked synth-pop and new wave dry, the Haim sisters dug up the decade's biggest, poppiest sounds and fashioned a captivating debut album out of them. Days Are Gone sounds all the more unusual precisely because it's so mainstream; a list of their influences -- Stevie Nicks, Phil Collins, En Vogue, Shania Twain -- looks like a glance at the Top 40 from about 25 years before the album's release. Likewise, these songs revel in that era's sometimes-cheesy flourishes without a trace of irony, and the gated drums, gleaming synths, and muted guitars that dominate Days Are Gone haven't sounded so good since their original heyday. Not that Haim's approach is unstudied; the trio obviously did their homework to revive and embody these sounds so perfectly, and it took them five years of recording and re-recording these songs until they had just the right mix of smoothness and immediacy. The hard work paid off: Days Are Gone is full of should-be hits like "The Wire," which boasts a big, fist-pumping beat and sassy guitar licks (they can only be called that). Compared to the thin voices of so many 2010s pop stars, singer Danielle Haim's rich alto only adds to the group's throwback feel, but like her sisters, she's remarkably versatile. Over the course of the album, Haim captures and explores the nuances within the styles they're reviving: there's the sweet soft rock of "Honey & I" or "Don't Save Me," the title track's tight synth-pop, and the dark, driving territory of "Let Me Go" and "My Song 5," which, with its slinky melody and hard-hitting beats, makes the most of the trio's much-touted R&B influences. This song, along with much of Days Are Gone, features production by Ariel Rechtshaid, whose work with Usher and Vampire Weekend proves he has the breadth to help Haim unite their ideas into a coherent sound. Still, it's the writing that ultimately prevents Days Are Gone from being just an extremely accurate exercise in nostalgia. The best moments here, such as the bookends "Falling" and "Running If You Call My Name," would be great pop songs regardless of when they sound like they're from. A debut album that could pass for a greatest-hits collection, Days Are Gone will provide musical comfort food for some, and possibly an introduction to irony-free pop for others. © Heather Phares /TiVo
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 18, 2019 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Alternative & Indie - Released July 7, 2017 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
If we're being perfectly honest, listening to Haim's music is like drinking a cold glass of water. No surprises, but always refreshing. Four years after Days Are Gone, the sisters Este, Danielle and Alana have broken their silence with a second album, which they wrote and produced themselves. It's a way of declaring that behind the massive pop machine that they represent, there are real auteurs, real musicians. And you've got to admit, every phrase, every melody, every solo, every chorus of Something to Tell You has been meticulously polished. The alloy of XXL pop, soft rock and 90s music works perfectly. Haim is not there to revolutionise the music of our times: they just want to create killer choruses and catchy melodies. And these are melodies that will keep you humming along, be it in the shower or in a stadium... This is a work that makes these three Californian sisters worthy heirs to Fleetwood Mac, one of their inspirations...© CM/Qobuz
CD£2.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 30, 2019 | Polydor Records

CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released July 31, 2019 | Polydor Records

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CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 2020 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
CD£13.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 26, 2020 | Polydor Records

The third album by the Haim sisters (Este, Alana and Danielle) is by far their best and most intimate. They skilfully mix a range of influences: pop, rock, R&B and even a hint of jazz through their use of brass, one example being the sax used on the opening track dedicated to their hometown Los Angeles (where they also criticise New York for its greyness…). This album comes out just at the right time, crowing a successful period that saw the three sisters headline the fourteenth Pitchfork Festival in Chicago in March 2019 alongside Robyn and the Isley Brothers. Danielle also featured on Vampire Weekend’s fourth album (Father of the Bride) and the Haim trio’s latest single appeared on October 30, 2019, announcing the album’s release (Now I’m In It). It was a song that seemed to be made for the mainstream, despite its lyrics that deal with depression, and was accompanied by a music video directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, the director of Boogie Nights and There Will Be Blood. Women in Music Pt. III is a truly endearing record that contains some beautiful moments such as the sunny Hallelujah or the bitter sweet Summer Girl that brings to mind the likes of Joni Mitchell and Fleetwood Mac, both artists that are adored by the Californian trio. © Yan Céh/Qobuz
CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 13, 2017 | Polydor Records

CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released July 7, 2017 | Polydor Records

If we're being perfectly honest, listening to Haim's music is like drinking a cold glass of water. No surprises, but always refreshing. Four years after Days Are Gone, the sisters Este, Danielle and Alana have broken their silence with a second album, which they wrote and produced themselves. It's a way of declaring that behind the massive pop machine that they represent, there are real auteurs, real musicians. And you've got to admit, every phrase, every melody, every solo, every chorus of Something to Tell You has been meticulously polished. The alloy of XXL pop, soft rock and 90s music works perfectly. Haim is not there to revolutionise the music of our times: they just want to create killer choruses and catchy melodies. And these are melodies that will keep you humming along, be it in the shower or in a stadium... This is a work that makes these three Californian sisters worthy heirs to Fleetwood Mac, one of their inspirations...© CM/Qobuz
CD£3.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

CD£3.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

CD£3.49

Alternative & Indie - Released September 1, 2017 | Polydor Records

CD£2.99

Rock - Released October 15, 2012 | Polydor Records

CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2017 | Polydor Records

CD£2.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Polydor Records

CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 8, 2017 | Polydor Records

CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 2020 | Polydor Records

CD£1.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records