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Country - Released July 21, 2019 | CMCapNash (N91)

The Legacy 1961-2017 is a revamped version of The Legacy 1961-2002, a four-disc box set originally released in 2003. The big difference between the two sets lies in the fourth disc. In Legacy's first incarnation, the fourth disc was devoted to live material, whereas the 2019 edition dedicates that final CD to Campbell's remarkable 21st century comeback. Thirteen highlights from 2008's Meet Glen Campbell, 2011's Ghost on the Canvas, 2013's See You There, 2015's I'll Be Me, and 2017's Adios comprise this fourth disc, making for a much better conclusion than the grab bag of live cuts from the 2003 box. While it's still possible to quibble about song selection on the three main discs -- there are a handful of minor masterworks like "Christian No" missing and perhaps too much material from the '80s -- overall, the box does an excellent job of telling Campbell's story, especially now that it has a fine final act in place. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released December 3, 2002 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2004 | EMI Gold

The Glen Campbell Collection highlights 34 tracks, spread out over two discs, of hits and quality album cuts recorded during his tenure with Capitol Records in the '60s and '70s, including the original versions of "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," "Gentle on My Mind," "Rhinestone Cowboy" and "Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in L.A.)." For those who are interested in just the hits, save some money and pick up the 15-track The Very Best of Glen Campbell on Capitol/Liberty. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1987 | EMI Trade Marketing

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Country - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Nashville

There is no definitive Glen Campbell compilation, but this 130-minute, two-disc set from England comes very close to it, and also forms a perfect compliment to Razor & Tie's Glen Campbell Collection: 1962-1989 (which it overlaps amazingly little). With 46 songs, selected from various singles, starting with Campbell's first pop/rock hit "Universal Soldier" and rarities such as the beautiful flops "Guess I'm Dumb" (co-authored and produced by Brian Wilson) and "Less of Me," along with various album tracks and B-sides, it's as good a cross-section of his sound (including two duets with Bobbie Gentry) and his successes as you can find. What's more, by ranging freely through the hits and the album cuts, it shows off Campbell's strengths in various idioms, from the country-ish "Just Another Man" and the more pop-focused "It's Over," to the brilliant "Reason to Believe" and non-LP sides, such as "You're Young and You'll Forget" sandwiched in between "Wichita Lineman" and Campbell's own "Everytime I Itch I Wind Up Scratching You." "True Grit," the title-song of the film in which he co-starred, is very much a piece with the best of his singles from that era, immersed in rich melodic textures, supported by moderately dense orchestration backing a superb vocal performance. Disc two is intriguing for its inclusion of the Jimmy Webb songs Campbell recorded during the early '70s (beginning with "Honey Come Back") that didn't become hits, and which haven't been heard often (if at all) on CD; they make a logical core for the second half of Campbell's Capitol history, and have generally been ignored along with most of that history (other than "Rhinestone Cowboy" and "Southern Nights"), and "As Far As I'm Concerned," "It's Only Make Believe," "Just Another Piece of Paper," "Last Time I Saw Her," and "Dream Sweet Dreams About Me" are among the best sides Campbell ever recorded, and are comparable to his finest work from the 1960s. The sound is crisp, state-of-the-art fidelity circa 1998, which makes it comparable (or superior) to most of the rival compilations out there from American Capitol. The annotation is also reasonably thorough, and the packaging is neat and unpretentious. This British release is worth tracking down, though its virtues are also both sad reflections of the lack of respect with which American Capitol has usually treated Campbell's catalog. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1977 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released November 4, 2013 | Humphead Records

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Rock - Released June 15, 2018 | Glen Campbell - Demo PS

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Country boy Glen Campbell is often described as a singer who is "famous for his taste for variety". That’s not to say that his country pop from the late ‘70s is meaningless and simple. Quite the contrary! Tracks such as Southern Nights, Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita Lineman have become classics because they contained all the ingredients needed to make a hit at that time. But Campbell's career is much richer and more complex. It’s full of details that make him a legend of American music. An experienced guitarist, singer, composer, songwriter and even TV host, he balanced his career between the spotlight and the less exposed life in the studio. It must be said that there were plenty of studio teams that revolutionized music in the ‘60s and ‘70s, and Campbell was an integral part of one of the greatest, if not THE greatest: The Wrecking Crew (a.k.a. The Clique or The Phil Spector Wall of Sound). In 1962, thanks to Jimmy Bowen, he joined this ensemble of musicians from the West Coast and met bassist Carol Kaye, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, drummer Hal Blain as well as Frank Sinatra, Rick Nelson and most importantly... The King! Sings For The King is a completely new posthumous record. These 18 recently discovered recordings, which reflect a sort of intimate correspondence between Campbell and Presley, were produced by the country boy for his friend between 1964 and 1968. It was a surprise gift that was never meant for our ears... Glen Campbell had two advantages. The first was that he could match Elvis’ tone and delivery, and the second was that he had been close to the star since 1956. It was an effective way to present Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman's new compositions to The King. It’s a record that couldn’t have opened in any other way than with this legendary duo on We Call On Him, where the harmony between the two men is obvious. It’s ballad on the piano that combines these two crooning voices on a melancholic tune that’s carried by subtle choirs. It’s a very emotional moment. This is followed by 17 tracks performed by Glen, who displays his imitation skills. From Easy Come, Easy Go and Spinout to I'll Be Back and I Got Love, his seventeen performances were all validated by The King. He’s a figure in the shadows who certainly contributed to the career of one of the greatest musicians of all time. However, on this record, it’s Campbell who is in the spotlight and it feels great! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Nashville

No artist waits 40 years to introduce himself, so the title of Glen Campbell's 2008 album, Meet Glen Campbell, can be taken with a grain of salt -- unless it's seen as a way to introduce Campbell to a new, younger audience, which certainly seems to be the intention of this record, as it finds the countrypolitan crooner abandoning the bland professional songwriters he's relied upon in the '80s and '90s and turning to newer rock & rollers. That these younger rock & rollers include Tom Petty and Jackson Browne should give some indication that this isn't quite as daring a move as it may initially seem, even if Campbell does cover the Replacements here, but daring isn't the name of the game on Meet Glen Campbell and thankfully neither is irony, as this never succumbs to the cringing camp of Pat Boone singing metal. Thanks to producers Julian Raymond and Howard Willing -- who enlist the help of plenty of modern pop thoroughbreds, including Roger Joseph Manning, Jr. and Jason Falkner of Jellyfish and Cheap Trick's Robin Zander -- Meet Glen Campbell evokes the soft, warm haze of his classic '60s and '70s, when he turned Jimmy Webb's eccentricities into pop standards. Although they do make slight concessions to modernity on the rhythm tracks of Travis' "Sing" and Green Day's "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" (also tellingly the two weakest songs on this brief album), Raymond and Willing use "Wichita Lineman" and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" as their touchstones, picking songs that lend themselves to evocative melodrama, which generally means rich, elegiac ballads from Paul Westerberg's "Sadly Beautiful" and U2's "All I Want Is You" to Jackson Browne's "These Days," a song so perfectly suited for Campbell's voice it's a wonder that it never popped up on one of his LPs in the early '70s. Then again, Meet Glen Campbell is filled with small wonders, including how the Velvet Underground's "Jesus" is given a delicate acoustic treatment and how the Foo Fighters' "Times Like These" bears an arrangement that consciously echoes "Galveston" and is all the better for it. This reverence for Campbell's greatest work is what grounds Meet Glen Campbell, as it shows a deep understanding of what made those recordings work as pop records as well as an understanding of what a terrific interpretive singer Campbell is at his peak. For too long, Glen Campbell has been wandering away from these strengths, singing anonymous songs in sterile settings, but here he has the right production and an exceptional set of songs, all adding up an album that is alluringly out of time, caught somewhere between the '60s and the '90s, illustrating how enduring Campbell's sound really is. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
No artist waits 40 years to introduce himself, so the title of Glen Campbell's 2008 album, Meet Glen Campbell, can be taken with a grain of salt -- unless it's seen as a way to introduce Campbell to a new, younger audience, which certainly seems to be the intention of this record, as it finds the countrypolitan crooner abandoning the bland professional songwriters he's relied upon in the '80s and '90s and turning to newer rock & rollers. That these younger rock & rollers include Tom Petty and Jackson Browne should give some indication that this isn't quite as daring a move as it may initially seem, even if Campbell does cover the Replacements here, but daring isn't the name of the game on Meet Glen Campbell and thankfully neither is irony, as this never succumbs to the cringing camp of Pat Boone singing metal. Thanks to producers Julian Raymond and Howard Willing -- who enlist the help of plenty of modern pop thoroughbreds, including Roger Joseph Manning, Jr. and Jason Falkner of Jellyfish and Cheap Trick's Robin Zander -- Meet Glen Campbell evokes the soft, warm haze of his classic '60s and '70s, when he turned Jimmy Webb's eccentricities into pop standards. Although they do make slight concessions to modernity on the rhythm tracks of Travis' "Sing" and Green Day's "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" (also tellingly the two weakest songs on this brief album), Raymond and Willing use "Wichita Lineman" and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" as their touchstones, picking songs that lend themselves to evocative melodrama, which generally means rich, elegiac ballads from Paul Westerberg's "Sadly Beautiful" and U2's "All I Want Is You" to Jackson Browne's "These Days," a song so perfectly suited for Campbell's voice it's a wonder that it never popped up on one of his LPs in the early '70s. Then again, Meet Glen Campbell is filled with small wonders, including how the Velvet Underground's "Jesus" is given a delicate acoustic treatment and how the Foo Fighters' "Times Like These" bears an arrangement that consciously echoes "Galveston" and is all the better for it. This reverence for Campbell's greatest work is what grounds Meet Glen Campbell, as it shows a deep understanding of what made those recordings work as pop records as well as an understanding of what a terrific interpretive singer Campbell is at his peak. For too long, Glen Campbell has been wandering away from these strengths, singing anonymous songs in sterile settings, but here he has the right production and an exceptional set of songs, all adding up an album that is alluringly out of time, caught somewhere between the '60s and the '90s, illustrating how enduring Campbell's sound really is. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released February 9, 2009 | Capitol Nashville

Sometimes it seems like not a year passes without a new Glen Campbell hits collection, and the simply titled Greatest Hits -- a title that has been used in some iteration at least ten times since 1971, probably more -- is the 2009 installment in this plan. The impetus for this Greatest Hits is the growth in digital releases (the collection issued both on CD and digitally), as well as the desire to capitalize on his fine 2008 comeback, Meet Glen Campbell, represented here by readings of the Foo Fighters' "Times Like These" and Jackson Browne's "These Days," which nicely cap a collection of basics, 14 songs that appear on pretty much any other Campbell collection released in the past four decades or so. As an introduction, it's clean and lean, offering all of the big hits ("Rhinestone Cowboy," "Wichita Lineman," "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," etc.), which will appeal to new listeners perhaps hooked by Meet Glen Campbell -- and conversely, old fans may be enticed by the two new cuts. However, this is nothing more than basics: there are compilations that are more comprehensive and interesting out there for those who are interested -- but for those who just want the hits, this has them. [Greatest Hits was included as a bonus disc in the two-CD edition of Campbell's final album, Adiós, released in 2017.] © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1978 | Capitol Nashville

There was a brief vogue for recording guitar-oriented instrumentals of folk songs for the pop and rock market just around the time the early-'60s folk boom started to taper off. Billy Strange's Twelve String Guitar was one of them, and so was The Astounding 12-String Guitar of Glen Campbell. And like that Strange LP, this was not so much a folk-rock precursor as an appropriation of folk melodies for Hollywood studio sessions that happened to use some bass and drums in addition to the guitar. If nothing else, this album is notable evidence of Campbell's considerable instrumental skills, which have generally been overlooked since his rise as a pop vocal star. But these readings of tunes like "Puff (The Magic Dragon)," "Blowin' in the Wind," "Green, Green," and "This Land Is Your Land" are rather perfunctory, as if they were laid down in an hour or two between the players' other session commitments (and it would be no surprise to learn that was the case). Campbell does take one vocal, on Bob Dylan's "Walkin' Down the Line" (which Dylan had yet to release at that point), which is probably the highlight of the album. He also wrote a couple of serviceable instrumental showcases for his 12-string, "12-String Special" and "Bull Durham." Notable session players on the record include drummers Hal Blaine and Earl Palmer, banjoist Roy Clark (who wrote one of the tracks, "Lonesome Twelve"), and Chip Douglas (later to produce the Monkees); noted pop and rock producer Nick Venet co-produced. Make sure you check the disc itself before you buy it, as a reissued version, unfortunately, deleted a couple of the dozen tracks from the already-short running time; those were "Wimoweh" and "The Ballad of Jed Clampett" (aka the theme to The Beverly Hillbillies). © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | Capitol Nashville

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Rock - Released June 15, 2018 | Glen Campbell - Demo PS

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Country boy Glen Campbell is often described as a singer who is "famous for his taste for variety". That’s not to say that his country pop from the late ‘70s is meaningless and simple. Quite the contrary! Tracks such as Southern Nights, Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita Lineman have become classics because they contained all the ingredients needed to make a hit at that time. But Campbell's career is much richer and more complex. It’s full of details that make him a legend of American music. An experienced guitarist, singer, composer, songwriter and even TV host, he balanced his career between the spotlight and the less exposed life in the studio. It must be said that there were plenty of studio teams that revolutionized music in the ‘60s and ‘70s, and Campbell was an integral part of one of the greatest, if not THE greatest: The Wrecking Crew (a.k.a. The Clique or The Phil Spector Wall of Sound). In 1962, thanks to Jimmy Bowen, he joined this ensemble of musicians from the West Coast and met bassist Carol Kaye, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, drummer Hal Blain as well as Frank Sinatra, Rick Nelson and most importantly... The King! Sings For The King is a completely new posthumous record. These 18 recently discovered recordings, which reflect a sort of intimate correspondence between Campbell and Presley, were produced by the country boy for his friend between 1964 and 1968. It was a surprise gift that was never meant for our ears... Glen Campbell had two advantages. The first was that he could match Elvis’ tone and delivery, and the second was that he had been close to the star since 1956. It was an effective way to present Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman's new compositions to The King. It’s a record that couldn’t have opened in any other way than with this legendary duo on We Call On Him, where the harmony between the two men is obvious. It’s ballad on the piano that combines these two crooning voices on a melancholic tune that’s carried by subtle choirs. It’s a very emotional moment. This is followed by 17 tracks performed by Glen, who displays his imitation skills. From Easy Come, Easy Go and Spinout to I'll Be Back and I Got Love, his seventeen performances were all validated by The King. He’s a figure in the shadows who certainly contributed to the career of one of the greatest musicians of all time. However, on this record, it’s Campbell who is in the spotlight and it feels great! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Country - Released July 1, 1975 | CMCapNash (N91)

Early on in Rhinestone Cowboy, Glen Campbell sings that he's making his "comeback," a sentiment that can't help but seem to carry an autobiographical heft. While it is true that he was hardly off the charts in the early '70s, the quality of his music was a little inconsistent; the singles were often good, but his albums were burdened with schlock and erratic in quality. He started to break free with a pair of 1974 albums, Houston (I'm Comin' to See You) and the Jimmy Webb tribute Reunion, but it wasn't until 1975's Rhinestone Cowboy that he seemed in full control of his talent, delivering a record that stands proudly next to his '60s peaks. Much credit is due to the presence of producers Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter, who help focus Campbell through their own tunes, their expert selection of songs, and their shimmering, high-gloss production that dazzles on the surface but also delivers considerable thematic and musical substance. Throughout the record, there are allusions to Campbell being a country boy stranded in the big city, where he's successful but emotionally adrift. This is most evident on the album's two big hits, "Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in L.A.)" and "Rhinestone Cowboy" itself, but his yearning is underpinned by sad songs like "I'd Build a Bridge," the despairing "We're Over," and a heartbreaking version of Randy Newman's "Marie." Among this, a cheerful cover of the Temptations' "My Girl" seems a little out of place, but this is the only outright misstep in an otherwise masterful album that manages to sound soothing even when it's sad. Even with its undercurrents of melancholy, Rhinestone Cowboy sounds and feels like a triumph because of the assured, layered lushness of the Lambert/Potter production and Campbell's fine performances. He sounds engaged by the material, bringing out nuances within the songs, and it's positively a joy to hear after several years of wandering. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1990 | Capitol Nashville

Listening to this album, you may get the feeling of being in a time warp -- it's a 1990 release, but parts of it recall Glen Campbell's bluegrass work from the outset of his recording career, nearly 30 years earlier, while other songs echo his country-pop successes of the late 1960s and early 1970s. There's at least one masterpiece here -- "Jesus on Your Mind" -- and a brace of near-classics, including "Tied to the Tracks" and "Cheatin' Is," and the overall recording is as good as such perennial sellers as Wichita Lineman or Galveston. Campbell and Reggie Young, Billy Joe Walker, Jr., and Pat Flynn turn in impeccable guitar work throughout, and Campbell's voice has aged well across the decades; additionally, he has help from a dozen or so other country stars on "Jesus on Your Mind," including Larry Gatlin, Ricky Skaggs, and Kathy Mattea, while Lacy J. Dalton and Steve Wariner join Campbell in duets on "Woodcarver" and "You Will Not Lose," respectively. The ballads come off well also, and display the same level of virtuosity, and "Woodcarver" is an extraordinary song, with gorgeous singing and playing; but it is the faster numbers -- most notably "Walkin' in the Sun," written by Jeff Barry -- that come off best here. The multiple guitar workout on the "William Tell Overture" is a lot of fun as well, and it's no surprise that it appeared as a single in its own right, complete with a very humorous promotional video featuring Campbell playing the Lone Ranger. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1978 | Capitol Nashville

If 1977's Southern Nights was scattered, containing too many incompatible songwriters, Glen Campbell solved that problem with 1978's Basic, relying only on Michael Smotherman for material. The only other writer given that kind of showcase by Campbell was Jimmy Webb While Smotherman is hardly on the same par with Webb -- to begin with, he's not nearly as idiosyncratic or have as personal a viewpoint -- he is, nevertheless, a good, sturdy writer, working within the '70s singer/songwriter tradition with a fondness for mellow, catchy soft rock. He may be a little generic in some senses, but in the best sense. The songs on Basic work well according to the conventions of MOR soft rock and they're very ingratiating without a down moment on the record. Campbell responds to this strong set of songs with a committed, convincing vocal performance and, along with producer Thom Thacker (the team behind all but one cut on this record -- "Can You Fool" was recorded with Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter), has constructed an appealingly high-glossy professional pop record that glides along easily from beginning to end (although it does stumble slightly on its closer, "Grafhaidh Me Thu," a bagpipe-driven instrumental that is out of place with the rest of the record). If there are no classic moments -- as there were even on Southern Nights -- Basic makes up for it through its sheer consistency, since Campbell always had trouble delivering records that held their own from start to finish (even his classic '60s records could be uneven). Given its lack of big hits, this is not one for the casual listener. But most serious fans will likely concede that Basic is his last great album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Nashville

Anyone who only knows Glen Campbell's country-pop hits like "Wichita Lineman" will find his first album a revelation. Recorded in the midst of the college folk boom, Big Bluegrass Special paired off Campbell with Dale Fitzsimmons and Carl Tanberg, aka the Green River Boys, doing songs by Merle Travis, Cliffie Stone, Bob Nolan, and the Delmore Brothers. A long way from Campbell's Jimmy Webb-authored pop hits, this earthy bluegrass weaves in and out of folk, blues, and traditional country, and casts a wonderful spell in the process. The sound is more robust than the Louvin Brothers and has more raw energy than the Kingston Trio or the Shilos, and the songs are played and sung with an infectious enthusiasm, although their playing is no match for the Kentucky Colonels. Among the surprises is the bluesiest version of "One Hundred Miles Away from Home" ever done. Nick Venet's production gave the acoustic trio a very "hot" sound. True, this album only sold a fraction of Campbell's later '60s efforts, but it's still a pity, musically speaking, that it was never followed up. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1972 | Capitol Nashville