Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£11.99

Jazz - Released January 30, 1900 | CoolNote

CD£6.39

Jazz - Released January 30, 1900 | CoolNote

CD£2.99

Jazz - Released May 3, 1954 | Vintage Music

HI-RES£4.79
CD£4.79

Jazz - Released January 1, 1957 | BnF Collection

Hi-Res Booklet
CD£2.99

Jazz - Released February 2, 1958 | Vintage Music

CD£14.49

Jazz - Released September 30, 1972 | RCA Victor - Legacy

CD£23.49

Jazz - Released June 6, 1989 | RCA Records Label

This triple-CD set from Sony BMG has few surprises, except perhaps that John Snyder and not Barry Feldman, who had been doing a lot of BMG's big-band remasters, is the producer. Otherwise, it's not clear, either in the listening or the notes, as to whether any of these transfers (apparently all from metal parts) are newer or different from the spate of recent BMG reissues of Glenn Miller's legacy. What is clear, at least on the earliest sides, is that Miller's legacy, like the work of Arturo Toscanini for the same label and a lot of other 1930s material, is running up against a technological brick wall -- the resolution of modern analog-to-digital transfers may have gone as far with a lot of the oldest and most heavily used masters that it can, in terms of useful music material; from here on, all you're getting is higher-resolution ticks and crackle and other defects. "Moonlight Serenade" and the other early cuts here are still eminently listenable, to be sure, and the crispness is great in terms of bringing out nuance and subtle shading to the playing -- as an example, along with a little bit of distracting crackle in "In the Mood" (a recording that has surely seen a lot of wear and tear, and that millions know by heart), one can hear the softest tapping of the cowbell on the quietest part of the break, and the drums get a workout in what seems almost like real space -- but the surface noises are starting to get distracting in ways that they weren't a decade or two ago. That caveat stated, the collection is, indeed, wonderful, though no more so in any significant way than any of the double- or triple-CD sets issued on Miller since the 1980s, and especially those dating from the late '90s and beyond, when high-resolution transfers became standard. The 60 songs contain everything one would expect, and the three hours of listening time will be well spent here. Beyond that, this set, in its declaration on the front of the quality that BMG can deliver, reflects the reality that this music is out of copyright and unprotected (and, as a consequence, widely pirated) in parts of the world other than the United States. And the actual title is a little puzzling -- the cover art says "RCA Original Masters," which is how it is listed officially, but it also says (as do the CDs themselves) "The Best of Glenn Miller," while the spine reads "In the Mood: The Best of Glenn Miller." At least the music and the talent behind it speak in a clear, precise voice, and the annotation by Arthur Levy is highly informative. There are no recording dates listed, but at least some of the definitive remasterings are referred to in the data readout off the CD, as each track comes up. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
CD£12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | RCA Victor - Legacy

This CD was released as part of the extensive Bluebird/Legacy Jazz Moods series. There are two ways to look at this release. The 14 selections, other than the fact that most of them are cookers (or, in the parlance of the swing era, solid senders), are reissued in random order. The exact recording dates are not given (just the year) nor is there a personnel listing. The only liner notes, a paragraph on the back cover, informs listeners that "the Miller band was a star-laden organization which at various times featured the greatest soloists...." Nope, Miller's band was famous for its precise ensembles and did not have any famous soloists. The notes also state that "'Moonlight Serenade' is here, of course, are such other Miller mega-hits originally made for Bluebird and Columbia as 'Little Brown Jug'...." "Moonlight Serenade" and "Little Brown Jug" are not on this sampler and Miller's early records for Columbia resulted in zero hits; none of the Columbia recordings are here anyway. On the other hand, the music that is included is quite fun and does stick mostly to the rousing instrumentals, so listeners just wanting a sampling of Miller's jazz side will find these performances enjoyable. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD£12.99

Jazz - Released November 12, 1990 | RCA Bluebird

CD£14.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Bella Musica Edition

CD£14.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Bella Musica Edition

CD£12.99

Jazz - Released February 19, 1991 | RCA Bluebird

The three-disc Legends set features 50 of Glenn Miller's best-loved performances, including "Pennsylvania 6-5000," "Moonlight Serenade," "Chattanooga Choo Choo," and "In the Mood." The collection features a good mix of strictly instrumental songs as well as ones with vocalists, with "Fools Rush In" and "Oh Johnny, Oh Johnny, Oh" chief among those. Likewise, the tracks are pretty evenly divided between up-tempo numbers such as "My Blue Heaven," "Runnin' Wild," and "Sliphorn Jive" and sentimental, mellow songs like "Star Dust," "Serenade in Blue," and "Moonlight Cocktail." It may not be the most complete or definitive set of Glenn Miller's work available, but Legends does a good job of spotlighting the bandleader's best-known work. © Heather Phares /TiVo
CD£12.99

Jazz - Released February 10, 1992 | RCA Bluebird

CD£12.99

Jazz - Released May 19, 1992 | Legacy - Columbia

The majority of Glenn Miller's early recordings as a bandleader are included on this CD which is subtitled "Evolution of a Band." Miller heads a studio group (which includes trumpeter Bunny Berigan) on two numbers from 1935 (why weren't all four from that date included?) and on three complete sessions from 1937-38; if the liner notes are to be believed the final four performances are previously unissued alternate takes. All of the selections from 1937-38 are taken from a period when Miller was struggling to find his sound and, even by the time of "Dippermouth Blues" (from May 23, 1938), he had not found it yet. But although these recordings are not that distinctive, there are some good moments; the vocals by Kathleen Lane and Gail Reese are excellent. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD£14.49

Jazz - Released October 19, 1992 | RCA Bluebird

CD£14.49

Jazz - Released November 2, 1992 | RCA Bluebird

CD£4.79

Jazz - Released December 19, 1992 | Monrose Digital

CD£10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Legacy Recordings

The Glenn Miller Orchestra's appearance at Carnegie Hall does not contain any unusual material, sticking to the band's regular repertoire. However this was an auspicious occasion (showing that after years of struggle Miller had finally arrived) and there are plenty of highlights. Excellent versions of such songs as "Running Wild," "Little Brown Jug," "One O'Clock Jump" and "In the Mood" are the highlights and there are also two vocals by Ray Eberle and three from Marion Hutton. A good all-around showcase for the band, it is surprising that the music on this LP has yet to be reissued on CD. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD£7.99

Jazz - Released June 1, 1994 | Disques Orphée

CD£16.99

Jazz - Released February 16, 1995 | RCA Records Label

Glenn Miller's 1939-1942 Victor recordings have been reissued a countless number of times in many different ways through the years. This two-CD set does an excellent job of repackaging all of his hits plus a variety of vocal numbers in chronological order. The 47 selections sum up Miller's legacy quite well, making this a definitive set for listeners who do not desire everything that Glenn Miller recorded. © Scott Yanow /TiVo