Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£11.99

Cello Concertos - Released January 11, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
French cellist Gautier Capuçon does not lack for charisma (or talent), and he has emerged as a major star. The Erato label seems to have tried to capitalize on that with the design of this album, featuring photos by the American Jamie Beck that cast Capuçon as a kind of Byronic figure. It may be a bit over the top, but classical music needs stars. The contents of the album, however, may not quite live up to the heroic concept. They consist of live performances recorded between 2009 and 2015, not of new material. Schumann wrote more music for cello than other composers did, and assembling them in a single program may have made sense. But the sound universes of the Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129, and the various chamber pieces are entirely different. The major attraction here is the concerto, a work that has been revaluated upward in recent years as performers have clarified its knotty lines. Historically oriented performance works well with Schumann, and there is a historical reading by Argentine cellist Sol Gabetta with the Kammerorchester Basel. But Capuçon offers a fine modern-instrument option, and an important contributor to its success is octogenarian conductor Bernard Haitink, leading the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Sample the precise interplay between Capuçon and Haitink in the first movement, which makes the music seem to unfold inevitably. The concerto never drags, and Capuçon sounds gorgeous. The chamber works were recorded at the Verbier Festival in Switzerland with pianist Martha Argerich, and, in the case of the Fantasiestücke, Op. 88, Capuçon's brother Renaud on violin. Despite the august collaborators, these readings feature differing approaches from the principals and don't quite jell, either interpretively or sonically. Nevertheless, this is an album Capuçon's fans will want, and the reading of the concerto is an important addition to its growing discography. © TiVo
From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

Classical - Released November 4, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES£15.99
CD£13.99

Classical - Released October 30, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
CD£13.99

Classical - Released January 15, 2010 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Choc de Classica
In the public's imagination, Russian music is strongly associated with Romanticism because its rise to prominence occurred in the 19th century and its greatest practitioners, from Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky to Sergey Rachmaninov, powerfully expressed the brooding emotions popularly ascribed to their nationality and the Romantic era. However, it might surprise some listeners to know that a current of Classicism can also be found in Russian music, particularly in some of the works of Tchaikovsky, for he deeply admired the composers of the 18th century and prized the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart above all others. Perhaps more than in any other of his works, except the four orchestral suites and the Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky's Variations on a Rococo Theme reveals a nostalgia for the Classical style, updated in orchestration and technical showiness for the times, but with no obvious concessions to trends of Russian Romanticism, such as exoticism or nationalism. To be sure, Tchaikovsky's tell-tale melodic gifts are abundantly present, and his ardent personality is stamped on this piece, but its restraint and poise, as well as the brilliant virtuosic passages for the solo cello, bespeak a predilection for the forms and practices of another century. The current of Classicism ultimately found an honored place in 20th century music, most notably in the neo-Classical works of Igor Stravinsky, but it strongly informed the music of Sergey Prokofiev, whose Sinfonia Concertante for cello and orchestra is a good example of the marriage of Classical form with pungent modernist content. This is an assertive work, by turns grotesque and lyrical, that presents the cello in a dramatic showcase. But despite the extremely difficult writing for the cello, and the rather aggressive tone of much of the piece, the framework and tonal development are decidedly Classicist in structure, if not necessarily in expression. This 2008 recording by cellist Gautier Capuçon and the Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theatre, conducted by Valery Gergiev, presents the Variations first, obviously because of the lightness and charm of the work makes it an appealing appetizer for the heavier main course, the Sinfonia Concertante. Capuçon is a strong performer, equally matched to Gergiev in force of personality, physical presence, and energy, and the two artists make this a powerhouse of a recording that exudes stamina and vitality from beginning to end. Not to be left out, though, is the Mariinsky Orchestra, which plays with extraordinary precision and passion, and provides an ideal backdrop for the astounding feats by Capuçon. Virgin's recording is clear and vibrant, so the full range of sonorities and dynamics come through with immediacy and credible dimensions. © TiVo
From
CD£13.99

Classical - Released October 30, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Though presented as a planned set, this pair of Shostakovich cello concertos actually consists of live concerts, the first in Paris and the second in St. Petersburg, at the Mariinsky Theater. They have the electricity of good live concerts, and they're beautifully recorded. They're also stronger in some places than in others, and if you're sampling, keep going for a bit: you may find things you like a great deal. To these ears it's the places where cellist Gautier Capuçon interacts with conductor Valery Gergiev and the Mariinsky Orchestra in complex ways. The long slow movement of the Cello Concerto No. 1, Op. 107 is one of those to these ears, with great subtlety in the balance of the cello and the orchestra, mostly broken up into solos and small groups. Capuçon is an elegantly lyrical player, and the slow opening movement of the Cello Concerto No. 2, Op. 126 is luxuriantly beautiful. In the faster movements, if you're looking for that bit of venom that often pokes through in late Shostakovich, you'll find it in very short supply. Perhaps this is due to Gergiev's newly awakened pro-Russian attitudes, or perhaps the players collectively wanted to produce a more Western-oriented cello concerto pair to compete with the numerous all-Russian recordings on the market. It's not right or wrong, just something to be aware of. A worthwhile live Shostakovich release from a charismatic cellist and a veteran conductor. © TiVo
From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

Classical - Released November 6, 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
This release by cellist Gautier Capuçon is a crossover album, consisting of short melodies from various classical and pop sources; the range of the titular emotions is rather narrow. Listener reactions may depend on whether that's what they're after, but it's certainly a well-executed specimen of the form. Capuçon's classical selections hew pretty close to the list of all-time greatest hits, including Debussy's Clair de lune and Albinoni's Adagio, as well as other just slightly less familiar pieces. Beyond these, however, Capuçon is more adventurous. He pairs his chestnuts, which are very evocatively played, with not only classical crossover works from Max Richter, Michael Nyman, Ludovico Einaudi, and Qigang Chen, but also pop songs and instrumental pieces. The presence of Edith Piaf on a French release of this type is not so unusual, but Leonard Cohen (the admittedly ubiquitous Hallelujah) and Scott Joplin's The Entertainer are novel. The Joplin work and Astor Piazzolla's tango Oblivion come at the end and break the consistent mood of the music that has come before; listeners may or may not find that this works. A major contributor to the overall sound is pianist Jérôme Ducros, who accompanies Capuçon and has also arranged many of the pieces for cello and the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris; they're unusually varied arrangements of this type. Buyers after crossover cello music will find an attractive and inventive example here. © James Manheim /TiVo
From
CD£11.99

Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

Classical - Released December 6, 2019 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Young and handsome, striding almost menacingly towards the camera like Bonnie & Clyde on the album cover (but decidedly less dangerous), Gautier Capuçon and Yuja Wang appear just as striking and audacious nonetheless. Used to playing together, they bring a spirited approach to César Franck’s Sonata in A major, with a famous transcription by the cellist Jules Delsart which was endorsed by the composer. This world-renowned masterpiece has since become a staple of the repertoires of every cellist in the world. The melancholy nature of the music allows the instrument to display its full range of vocal possibilities. The two musicians give a daring performance, infusing it with an expressive and passionate romanticism. Gautier Capuçon, not averse to using soaring vibrato in large quantities, throws himself into Franck’s universe with the complicity of the extraordinary Chinese virtuoso Yuja Wang, whose dextrous agility on the keys translates through the speaker.The romanticism which Franck favoured at the end of the century is complemented by Chopin’s highbrow virtuosity in the Introduction et Polonaise brillante, Op. 3 composed in 1829 before he arrived in Paris. The version interpreted by these two artists elicits an almost irresistible desire to dance. This contrasts with the Sonata in G minor written much later, near the end of the Franco-Polish composer’s life. His final opus published while still alive, it’s an introspective work marked by Chopin’s collaboration and friendship with cellist Auguste-Joseph Franchomme who created it in 1848, surprising many of its first listeners with its innovative style of writing. A prominent representative of the French world of cello playing having done important work in the amplification of the left hand’s expression and having perfected bowing technique, Franchomme has in Gautier Capuçon a most suitable successor. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
For this album, which is made up entirely of "treats" from all manner of genres, the cellist Gautier Capuçon seems to have wanted to "illustrate" his life by retracing different emotional stages, from his childhood in Savoy to his Vienna years, by way of his studies in Paris and his discovery of more recent repertoires. This is a sort of invitation on a voyage, in the company of the Paris Chamber Orchestra, or by pianist Jérôme Ducros, for a few unmissable pieces by Saint-Saëns, Massenet, Popper, Joplin, Tchaikovsky, Popper, Piazzola, Casals or Paganini: this way, we are able to hear works which are often performed as transcriptions, as in the golden age of salon virtuosos. These hyper-virtuoso, hyper-romantic pieces allow us to enjoy our cellist's art to its full. © SM/Qobuz
From
CD£13.99

Classical - Released October 15, 2003 | Warner Classics

From
CD£1.49

Classical - Released December 15, 2017 | Warner Classics

From
CD£11.99

Classical - Released November 4, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Booklet
From
CD£13.99

Classical - Released January 7, 2008 | Warner Classics

From
CD£12.49

Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet
The Capuçon brothers, cellist Gautier and violinist Renaud, have been darlings of the English and Continental recital circuits with performances that have a lot of flair, effortless technical control, and an overall feeling of freshness. All those traits are in evidence in this traversal of Beethoven's music for cello and piano by Gautier Capuçon and Frank Braley, which includes three rarely heard variation sets from the early part of the composer's career. Those make for something of a letdown if you listen to the set from beginning to end, for Capuçon and Braley excel in the two late sonatas, the Cello Sonata No. 4 in C major, Op. 102, No. 1, and Cello Sonata No. 5 in D major, Op. 102, No. 2. The pair shifts gears admirably through the cycle, with the graceful Classical approach of the pair of early Op. 5 sonatas contrasting sharply with the likes of the thorny final fugue in Op. 102, No. 2. The weak point here is the Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69, where Capuçon and Braley seem to try consciously to go counter to type, avoiding middle-Beethoven monumentality in favor of a rather breezy tone. It may work for you, and it may not, but the technical confidence of the players and their ability to react quickly to what the other is doing are impressive throughout. The sound, from Schloss Elmau in the Bavarian Alps in Germany, is distant and off-putting. © TiVo
From
CD£1.49

Classical - Released November 24, 2017 | Warner Classics

From
CD£1.49

Classical - Released December 8, 2017 | Warner Classics

Artist

Gautier Capuçon in the magazine