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Alternative & Indie - Released October 30, 2015 | Beggars Banquet

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The Pleasure Principle was an important point of departure for Gary Numan, and a significant breakthrough moment in the context of his long and storied career. Released about six months after Replicas, it was an instant commercial success, quickly reaching the dizzy heights of number one in the UK Charts. On this record, his third solo effort (and first under his own name), Numan abandoned guitars completely, instead embracing a more synthetic style of production. The album heralded the purely electronic, distinctly robotic sound that this modern icon has become most famous for today. Numan employed a variety of Moog synthesizers to realise The Pleasure Principle, achieving his trademark sound largely by use of the distinctive ‘Vox Humana’ setting. Throw in a healthy dose of production trickery; including flanging, phasing, layers of reverb, and some solo violin, and you are the rest of the way there! Numan was influenced by the greatest pioneers of electronica - Kraftwerk’s epochal Autobahn ghosts the track ‘Cars’ (the very same synths were used!) – and, subsequently, he influenced a generation of new artists. Numan blazed a trail for Nine Inch Nails’s industrial rock, Afrika Bambaataa’s hip-hop explosion, and even early-2000s club bangers like Basement Jaxx’s immortal ‘Where’s Your Head At?’ A pleasure indeed.
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Rock - Released October 10, 2011 | Machine Music Ltd

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A reworked collection of songs previously discarded from several studio albums, Gary Numan's 20th effort, Dead Son Rising, suggests that the electro-pop pioneer should scrabble around for any more leftovers lurking in the vaults. For despite its pick and mix approach, the follow-up to 2006's Jagged (whose producer, Ade Fenton, also features again here) is arguably his most cohesive and consistent effort since his early-'80s heyday. Of course, it's difficult to ignore the huge Trent Reznor-sized shadow that looms over the majority of its 12 tracks, with the bombastic synths, crunching riffs, and menacing vocals on the likes of "When the Sky Bleeds, He Will Come" and "Big Noise Transmission" owing more than a nod to the industrial electro-metal of The Fragile. But neatly coming full circle, Nine Inch Nails' admittance of the influence Numan had on their career means the former Tubeway Army frontman has perhaps more right than anyone to borrow back a few ideas. Especially when they are as convincing as the likes of opening track "Resurrection," an unsettling and doom-laden ambient instrumental, which along with the brooding Depeche Mode-esque electro ballad "Dead Sun Rising" and the ghostly atmospherics of "We Are the Lost" would be perfectly suited to the end credits of a sci-fi horror movie. Elsewhere, "The Fall," an epic slice of sleazy '80s-tinged electro, shows the whole nu-synth movement how it's really done, while Numan reveals a rare vulnerability on the stark piano hooks and hushed whispered melodies of "Not the Love We Dream Of" and the solemn tale of obsession "For the Rest of My Life." It's a shame, then, that the album finishes with a whimper rather than a bang, as the stripped-back instrumental versions of the latter two take away the compelling elements of the originals, while the meandering "Into Battle" sounds like the half-finished demo that it might possibly have been. Nevertheless, it's impressive that over 30 years into his career, Numan isn't content to just trade on former glories, and while Dead Son Rising isn't likely to propel him back into the mainstream, it's an impressively bold affair that ensures his cult status will remain intact. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Electronic - Released December 10, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Prominent synth pop/new Wave artist Gary Numan presents his latest live album, Savage: Live at Brixton Academy. Recorded during the first leg of his Savage tour, it contains plenty of Numan's classic tracks as well as several cuts from his latest album, Savage (Songs from a Broken World). ~ Liam Martin
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 11, 2019 | Beggars Banquet

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Electronic - Released December 16, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Long gone are the times when Gary Numan juggled with his Minimoog, Polymoog and other ARP Odyssey. Great guru of the synth pop at the end of the seventies and the start of the eighties, the expert in new wave keyboard orgies remains nonetheless a master of the all synth. As proof, this 21th studio recording of the Londoner, which is actually a concept album about the mix of Western and Eastern cultures in a post-apocalyptic world that has become a desert because of global warming. David Bowie’s influence (who has always followed him like a shadow) is of course there. But Numan remains a true director/sound producer able to set up a personal mood in only two measures. And this Savage is no exception to the rule. © CM/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 1, 2019 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 30, 2015 | Beggars Banquet

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Rock - Released October 14, 2013 | Mortal Records - Cooking Vinyl

Kicking off with the gritty, crunchy, and industrial stomp of "I Am Dust" and the lyrics "We were dust in a world of grim obsession," Splinter (Songs from a Broken Mind) first suggests that Gary Numan is really a robot after all, programmed to spit out dour songs of loneliness and despair that use words like "dust," "broken," or "lost" as much as other songwriter's use the word "the." In other words, his evolution from icy new wave to icy, dark industrial music is still stuck in gritty goth-pleasing mode, but complaining that his music is narrow is like complaining that an espresso machine just makes espresso, even if it's the best espresso on earth. Splinter isn't the best dark industrial, or even the best Numan album on earth, but it is much closer than you'd expect, pulling upon his mid-life crisis and bout with depression and making high-caliber, connectable songs out of these empty feelings. Key track "Everything Comes Down to This" sounds like a juggernaut of a Nine Inch Nails song coming over the hill with some stately, Telekon-era styled synth soaring out of this scratchy nighttime world, while "Love Hurt Bleed" is that Bowie-brand of funky that Numan occasionally indulges in, and really should indulge in more often. The swaying title track perfects the sprawling type of song that was introduced too soon on albums like 1982's I, Assassin, but the real reasons casual fans should come back for this one are the naked, minimal, and moving ballads "Lost" and "My Last Day." They round out a varied album that's only missing a "Cars," "Change Your Mind," or "Everyday I Die"-sized hook, and while Numan's work remains strictly sulky stuff destined to ruin any party, he proves he's not a robot at all on his most connectable, personal, and palpable album to date. ~ David Jeffries
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2018 | Beggars Banquet

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Electronic - Released December 10, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 2009 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 22, 1998 | Beggars Banquet

The most popular of all the Gary Numan albums is undeniably 1979's The Pleasure Principle. The reasons are simple -- there is not a single weak moment on the disc, it contains his sole U.S. (number one worldwide) hit, "Cars," and new drummer Cedric Sharpley adds a whole new dimension with his powerful percussion work. The Pleasure Principle is also one of the first Gary Numan albums to feature true ensemble playing, especially heard within the airtight, killer groove of "Metal" (one of Numan's all-time best tracks). Starting things off with the atmospheric instrumental "Airlane," the quality of the songs gets stronger and stronger as the album progresses -- "Films," "M.E.," "Observer," "Conversation," the aforementioned "Cars," and the U.K. Top Ten hit "Complex" all show Numan in top form. If you had to own just one Gary Numan album, The Pleasure Principle would be it. ~ Greg Prato
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 1998 | Beggars Banquet

Gary Numan's follow-up to the flawless The Pleasure Principle was 1980's Telekon. Although it was another mega-hit back home in England (his third consecutive number one album), Numan could not follow up his massive new wave hit "Cars" in the United States, where he was unjustly slapped with the one-hit-wonder tag. Telekon would also turn out to be the last true classic Numan album, as monetary problems and an unfocused attempt to try different musical forms (as well as a short-lived retirement) would steer him away from his original vision. Although Telekon was indeed a strong album, it could have been even stronger if it included the U.K. Top Ten singles "I Die: You Die" and "We Are Glass" (both were recorded during the Telekon sessions). Numan experimented with funk for the first time in his career ("Remind Me to Smile"), but there were still plenty of chilling synth excursions to keep the Numan faithful satisfied -- "This Wreckage," "The Aircrash Bureau," "I'm an Agent," and "I Dream of Wires" are all choice cuts. The 1998 Beggars Banquet re-release eventually did include both the U.K. singles, as well as several other rarities, including a bare "piano version" of "Down in the Park." [Note: In addition to bonus tracks, all of the Gary Numan/Beggars Banquet re-releases contain classic photographs and informative liner notes by Numan biographer Steve Malins.] ~ Greg Prato
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 25, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

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Electronic - Released December 16, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 10, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

One of the downsides of the new romantic movement is that its groups tended to be more exciting in a video or in the studio than they were in the live arena. One of the rare exceptions to this rule was Gary Numan, a performer whose canny blend of synthesizer textures and conventional rock band instrumentation allowed his music to translate itself to a live format with ease. As a result, he was a popular concert attraction in his native England and listeners can get a good idea of his live skills with Living Ornaments '79. This album, the full set from a September 1979 performance at the Hammersmith Odeon, finds Numan taking a generous selection of tunes from all his albums up to that point and delivering them with a carefully controlled mixture of style and power. Many of the songs are much more energetic than their studio counterparts: the muscular rhythm guitar riffs that propel "Something's in the House" take on a new power in the live arena, and "Me I Disconnect From You" runs twice as fast as its studio incarnation. Other songs on Living Ornaments '79 benefit from new arrangements; the most notable transformation in this area is "Bombers," which is transformed from the fast, guitar-based punk-pop of its studio version into an atmospheric, ballad-paced track where spacy synthesizers replace the guitar riffs. Numan also turns in a surprisingly effective cover of "On Broadway" that culminates in an unexpected, electic violin solo. The remainder of the tracks continue in the same vein as these highlights, effectively mixing live energy with the icy electronic affectations that make Numan's studio classics so interesting. In short, Living Ornaments '79 is a solid live document of Gary Numan in his hitmaking prime and a worthwhile supplement to his studio work for fans. ~ Donald A. Guarisco
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Rock - Released February 19, 2016 | Machine Music Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1989 | I.R.S. Records

Numan has mentioned that he had a terrible time with his deal with IRS, and this live album reflects that. Poorly produced and unenthusiastic, definitely the worst of Numan's various live albums. ~ Steven McDonald
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 9, 2002 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 1999 | Beggars Banquet