Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£16.99

French Music - Released March 22, 2010 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Sélection Les Inrocks
The English-speaking world may only remember Françoise Hardy as a '60s icon, but in France, she is rightly considered a major artist. The truth is that in the course of a 48-year career, Hardy has released 26 albums, almost invariably excellent. La Pluie Sans Parapluie is her first collection of original material in six years, a period the famously reclusive Hardy spent in putting together a duets album, and writing a very successful autobiography. Compared to 2004's elegiac Tant de Belles Choses, La Pluie Sans Parapluie is a much sunnier album, one that immediately brings to mind the lush yet intimate pop of her early-'70s work, such as Message Personnel and Et Si Je M'en Vais Avant Toi. "Sunnier," however, is an adjective that can only be used in comparison, as Hardy's entire oeuvre is the very definition of nocturnal, embodied in her dreamy hush of a voice against velvety arrangements. In this context, it only means that a few songs, such as the opener "Noir su Blanc" or "Champ d'Honneur," are driven by a typical rhythm track of drums and bass, rather than by piano or strings. Hardy writes the majority of the texts, while longtime collaborator Alain Lubrano and a cohort of France's most stylish tunesmiths such as Calogero, Murat, La Grande Sophie, Arthur H, or Pascale Daniel, as well as Germany's Fouxi and England's Ben Christophers, contribute fitting soundtracks to her catalog of longing, regret, and sensuous abandon. A particularly inspired second half includes gems such as "Le Temps de la Innocence" or "Mister," both worthy of a place among her late-'60s masterpieces Comment Te Dire Adieu or Ma Jeunesse Fout le Camp. As most Françoise Hardy releases go, La Pluie Sans Parapluie could easily double as a handbook in French elegance, it's got timeless class. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
From
CD£7.99

French Music - Released November 5, 2012 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD£7.49

French Music - Released June 30, 1962 | Vogue

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

French Music - Released November 24, 1973 | Warner (France)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES£14.49
CD£12.49

French Music - Released December 15, 1968 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res
From
CD£20.49

Pop - Released April 10, 2009 | Parlophone (France)

From
HI-RES£17.99
CD£15.49

French Music - Released April 6, 2018 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res Booklet
Françoise Hardy is a pop survivor. As she admitted herself, her 2012 album L’Amour Fou sounded the death knell of a prolific 50-year career. But after listening completely by chance to a song of Finnish band Poets of the fall, she decided to adapt it in French and that’s how this new album adventure all started. The singer of Message personnel has always dressed up her albums with patchy elements from all of sorts of collaborations (both for the music and lyrics), and this Personne d’autre is no exception to the rule. A personality seems to stand out, and that’s Erick Benzi, who composed nine songs on this album. He’s also the author behind most arrangements. In addition to Benzi, the credits feature La Grande Sophie, Thierry Stremler and… Michel Berger (for the cover of Seras-tu là?).
Unsurprisingly Personne d’autre specifically focuses on death, with which Françoise Hardy had a close encounter in the middle of the 2010s. But rather than fearing it, the singer looks at death straight in the eyes, even considering it with a form of lightness, like in the counting rhyme Trois petits tours – the only perky track on the album. But aside from this surprising song, the opus seems like a sweet purgatory, in which atonement appears to be a step more pleasant than painful. This flawless harmony comes first and foremost from the magnificent melodies that enrich each song: in the tender lullaby Dors mon ange, the melancholic Personne d’autre or the elegant waltz Quel Dommage, Françoise Hardy shows once again her attraction for beautiful and noble melodies. At times, deadly metaphors are not the most subtle, like in the lyrics of Train Spécial, but it's arrangements are deliciously 80s. Same goes for the strong echo that underlies her voice here and there, transforming her de facto into an angelic figure rising into heaven. But overall, the listener will be seduced by the gracious serenity of what − from all angles − sure seems like a farewell album. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
From
CD£6.39

French Music - Released March 4, 2014 | Beyond Recognition

From
HI-RES£14.49
CD£12.49

French Music - Released October 15, 1968 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res
From
CD£11.99

French Music - Released November 14, 2004 | Parlophone (France)

From
CD£11.99

French Music - Released October 16, 1971 | Parlophone (France)

From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

French Music - Released June 1, 1970 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res
From
CD£16.99

French Music - Released November 21, 2005 | Parlophone (France)

From
HI-RES£14.49
CD£12.49

French Music - Released November 15, 1967 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res
From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released June 30, 1966 | Vogue

From
CD£8.99

French Music - Released July 23, 2003 | Wagram Music

From
HI-RES£13.99
CD£11.99

French Music - Released October 16, 1978 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res
Little of what Françoise Hardy recorded after the early '70s succeeded in dating well, and this LP from 1978 was one of the first of a desultory string of recordings. Produced by Gabriel Yared, J'Écoute de la Musique Saoûle places Hardy in the context of a mawkish balladeer, a position she's only rarely able to transcend with more subtle vocals. The slick, catchy title track featured Hardy purring over a variety of period effects, and "Brouillard Dans la Rue Corvisart" -- her duet with Jacques Dutronc -- is a notable lost opportunity, the song taken at a relaxed tempo that allows little of real emotion to seep through. Very occasionally, glimpses of the old, artistic Hardy can be heard; "Si Je le Retrouve un Jour" is yet another weepy ballad, though a bit of acoustic guitar allows her to sound as evocative as she did during her late-'60s peak. © John Bush /TiVo
From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released June 30, 1964 | Vogue

From
CD£11.99

French Music - Released November 27, 2006 | Parlophone (France)

French teen idol and pop icon Françoise Hardy returned to record shelves in 2006 with Parenthèses, a collection of 12 duets. Longtime collaborators like Henri Salvador and husband Jacques Dutronc join some up-and-comers to offer up a slew of some of Hardy's favorites. Among the selections, the intimate and lilting duet with Dutronc, the eerie "My Beautiful Demon" with Ben Christophers and "Le Fou de la Reine" (with the perpetually smooth Henri Salvador) are highlights. Keeping production tricks and mixing slick-ery to a tasteful minimum, Hardy manages to capture quite a bit of the magic that made earlier efforts (like 1971's Question) so uncluttered and engaging. Even Julio Iglesias seems to get into the groove, turning in a fine rendition of Dutronc's aching "Partir Quand Même..." that's neither flashy nor overtly sexy -- just comfortable -- and that's a good overall description of the album as well. © J. Scott McClintock /TiVo
From
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Pop - Released October 3, 2018 | RevOla

Hi-Res