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French Music - Released March 22, 2010 | Parlophone France

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Sélection Les Inrocks
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French Music - Released November 5, 2012 | Parlophone France

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
4 stars out of 5 -- "[It's] perhaps, her best: a set of ballads build around piano and strings, on which the promises, infelicities and heartbreaks of an impossible love are laid bare."
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French Music - Released November 19, 2007 | Vogue

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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French Music - Released November 24, 1973 | WM France

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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French Music - Released September 29, 1995 | Parlophone France

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Throughout her career, most of Françoise Hardy's arrangements have tended toward the lush, though in a good way. La Question is lush too, but it's one of her most sparsely produced efforts, usually finding her voice accompanied by little more than an acoustic guitar, touches of bass, and very subtle orchestration. Much of the record's lights-low ambience could be attributed to Tuca (no last name given), who played guitar, co-arranged, and co-wrote most of the tunes (though Hardy did contribute to the composition of a few tracks). It may be her best post-'60s effort, songs like "Chanson d'O" and "Le Martien" featuring some of her most whispery, seductive vocals. As fireside romantic music goes, it beats the hell out of José Feliciano. ~ Richie Unterberger
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French Music - Released September 11, 2000 | Parlophone France

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
Sung (except for one track) in English, this 1972 album (originally titled just Françoise Hardy) was reissued on CD by Virgin France in 2000 under the title If You Listen, and issued in some foreign territories under yet different titles in the 1970s. However it was titled, it was a good, tasteful, and subdued set of folk-rock- and singer/songwriter-influenced covers (though the one French song, "Brulure," was the sole original Hardy composition). It's no surprise that the mood here is dignified rainy-day sorrow. But that was Hardy's forte, and the arrangements, emphasizing acoustic guitar and light strings, seem to indicate she was doing some listening to British folk-rock and American singer/songwriters. So does the choice of covers, including songs by Buffy Sainte-Marie, Neil Young ("Till the Morning Comes"), Beverley Martyn, and Randy Newman ("I Think It's Gonna Rain Today"). There's also the quite obscure "The Garden of Jane Delawnay," a misspelled interpretation of "The Garden of Jane Delawney" by the British folk-rock band the Trees; "Let My Name Be Sorrow," originally done by Mary Hopkin; and a couple of tunes co-written by Mick Jones, later of Foreigner. None of songs rate among her best work, but it's still a good album, often overlooked even by Hardy fans and notable in that just one of the English songs ("Bown Bown Bown") was also recorded by Hardy in a French version. It's also much superior to her album of English cover versions of just three years before, Françoise Hardy en Anglais, which was over-produced and far heavier on the syrup. ~ Richie Unterberger
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French Music - Released April 6, 2018 | Parlophone France

Hi-Res Booklet
Françoise Hardy is a pop survivor. As she admitted herself, her 2012 album L’Amour Fou sounded the death knell of a prolific 50-year career. But after listening completely by chance to a song of Finnish band Poets of the fall, she decided to adapt it in French and that’s how this new album adventure all started. The singer of Message personnel has always dressed up her albums with patchy elements from all of sorts of collaborations (both for the music and lyrics), and this Personne d’autre is no exception to the rule. A personality seems to stand out, and that’s Erick Benzi, who composed nine songs on this album. He’s also the author behind most arrangements. In addition to Benzi, the credits feature La Grande Sophie, Thierry Stremler and… Michel Berger (for the cover of Seras-tu là?).
Unsurprisingly Personne d’autre specifically focuses on death, with which Françoise Hardy had a close encounter in the middle of the 2010s. But rather than fearing it, the singer looks at death straight in the eyes, even considering it with a form of lightness, like in the counting rhyme Trois petits tours – the only perky track on the album. But aside from this surprising song, the opus seems like a sweet purgatory, in which atonement appears to be a step more pleasant than painful. This flawless harmony comes first and foremost from the magnificent melodies that enrich each song: in the tender lullaby Dors mon ange, the melancholic Personne d’autre or the elegant waltz Quel Dommage, Françoise Hardy shows once again her attraction for beautiful and noble melodies. At times, deadly metaphors are not the most subtle, like in the lyrics of Train Spécial, but it's arrangements are deliciously 80s. Same goes for the strong echo that underlies her voice here and there, transforming her de facto into an angelic figure rising into heaven. But overall, the listener will be seduced by the gracious serenity of what − from all angles − sure seems like a farewell album. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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French Music - Released September 23, 2016 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released March 4, 2014 | Beyond Recognition

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French Music - Released April 10, 2009 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released September 23, 2016 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released August 30, 2010 | Wagram Music

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French Music - Released April 8, 2016 | Vogue

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French Music - Released February 16, 2018 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released November 14, 2004 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released November 19, 2007 | Vogue

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French Music - Released September 18, 2015 | Eminent Legacy Records

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French Music - Released April 6, 2018 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released February 4, 2015 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released April 19, 1996 | Parlophone France

Francoise Hardy is mostly known as a pop chanteuse with mild rock influences. It comes as something of a shock, then, to stick this into the CD player and hear her backed by assertive, guitar-oriented modern rock arrangements. Hardy's delivery hasn't changed much; it's still a mixture of fetching sensuality and composed reserve. What has changed is the music, with its emphasis upon gutsy guitar textures that sound influenced by '90s alternative rock--a bit of grungetone here, some Brit-pop energy there, some rootsy slide work (on "Ici Ou La?") in the mold of Ry Cooder. Many middle-aged pop singers move from gritty rock to lighthearted MOR. Hardy, unusually, seems determined to move in exactly the opposite direction. It's not as good as, or very similar to, the charming sentimental pop of her youth. Yet it's not at all embarrassing, with a couple of tunes ("Dix Heures En Ete" and "Contre-Jour") that would have definite hit potential, in the best sense of the word, were they sung in English. Whatever you think, one would be hard-pressed to name other rock singers in their early fifties, from France or anywhere else, that managed to sound unassumingly contemporary in the mid-'90s. ~ Richie Unterberger