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Alternative & Indie - Released May 7, 2010 | WM UK

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks - Sélection du Mercury Prize
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 31, 2013 | Warner Bros.

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
While there are lots of bands dealing in either danceable rock or navel-gazing pop, few bands combine the two quite like Foals. On Holy Fire, the third album from the English band, the post-punk revival is given a newfound sense of depth, creating songs that are rhythmic enough to draw listeners, but hypnotic enough to leave listeners lost in their wide-open spaces. This combination of atmosphere and momentum find Foals growing out of the shadows of titans like the Talking Heads and into a spaced-out, dance-punk niche that's all their own. Though a lot of the band's charm comes from the delicate interplay between the guitars and keyboards, the real star of the album comes by way of the massive, stadium-ready "Inhaler," which takes the sparkling, slow build used throughout the album and turns it on its ear with an eruption of massively fuzzy, Muse-esque guitars (and, to some extent, their bombast), creating one of the albums biggest and most rousing moments. Now that they're three albums deep, it feels as if Foals have found a nice middle ground between funk and feeling, making Holy Fire an album that is just as likely to get a room moving as it is to send its inhabitants into a fit of introspective conversation. This kind of duality is something that's hard to find, and it's a quality that could take Foals a long way if they're able to hold onto it. ~ Gregory Heaney
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 31, 2013 | Warner Bros.

Videos Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 8, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Not one album, but two! Foals are back after a four-year break following the release of their acclaimed What Went Down. Yannis Philippakis’s band, whose novelty was starting to fade, is now writing a new chapter. Instead of a lengthy double album, so as not to scare their fans away, the Oxford quartet opted for two albums, one released in the spring, the other in the fall. Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost Part 1 does not have the high intensity of its predecessor, but it is still a piece of powerful rock full of exquisite pieces and crescendos (Exits, White Onions, Syrups) like these stage legends know how to make. Walter Gervers has left the band to pursue new adventures, and Foals chose to soften their style. Philippakis is producing for the first time, and the charismatic leader is having a blast working with new textures full of stage-tailored electro beats (Moonlight, In degress), percussive melodies (Cafe d’Athens – Radiohead’s In Rainbow), and introspective ballads played on the piano (I’m Done With The World (& It’s Done With Me)). This new chapter is only just getting started! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Following up Holy Fire can’t have been easy ... And to do so, Foals fling themselves headlong into a rock ‘n’ roll tsunami. With What Went Down, the Oxford gang retain their unique rock essence whilst also aiming for a wider audience. This, their fourth studio album, is undoubtedly another radical change for the band. In reaching a larger public, one might think that Yannis Philippakis and his band would have to sell their souls to the devil… The truth is quite to the contrary. What Went Down possesses a sound that hits home at the end of the first listen; the album’s guitars are rhythmic, colossal as mountains. The title track, in particular, is a force that sweeps away everything in its path, helpfully aided by the vocal charisma of Philippakis. Dark and oppressive, the album never loses sight of the importance of song structure. Raw power is an asset, a weapon for Foals, and never simply an end in itself. So much the better. This is a strong contender for the title of best indie rock album of 2015…
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2008 | Transgressive Records

Although Oxford, England's Foals didn't release their debut full-length, Antidotes, until the spring of 2008, they had already begun to make quite a name for themselves, thanks to the British singles "Hummer" and "Mathletics," and successful dates in the U.S. the preceding fall; meaning, of course, that the anticipation for the record had plenty of time to grow. Fortunately, Antidotes is able to live up to the hype. Frontman Yannis Philippakis uses his limited vocal range to his greatest advantage, moving from yelps to half-whispered singing depending on the intensity of the piece. In fact, the one drawback of the album may be that Foals have only two types of songs: the fast(er), punchy ones and the slow(er), spacier ones. For bands whose sense of songcraft isn't strong, this would certainly be a detriment, but as Foals keep melody and hookiness at the forefront of their minds, the fact that much of their work sounds very similar (and is all practically in the same key) just adds a sense of cohesion to the record, shows that the group has a very clear idea of what it wants to sound like. This sureness can also probably explain the band's dislike of producer Dave Sitek's final mix, which differed from what they had imagined (and therefore prompted their own mixing of it, and the one they ultimately released). But Sitek should be credited for introducing at least the saxophones, if not the more ambient keyboards and occasional electronic element, to the Foals' arrangements, which end up working quite well and prevent the tracks from completely bleeding into one another, also allowing for the band's instrumental sections to play out in an interesting groove, like during the very NOMO-ish "Like Swimming" or the close of "Heavy Water." The two guitars pick out cascading notes -- never chords -- against one another, the bass borrows from both Interpol and Gang of Four, and Philippakis' voice cries out in repetition wonderfully, but it's these occasional horn bursts, the electronic chops and blips, that truly complete the songs, making Antidotes not merely a lesson in post-new wave noodling, but evidence of the power and excitement of the genre and music itself. ~ Marisa Brown

Rock - Released February 13, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released February 25, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Electro - Released July 2, 2012 | !K7 Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 21, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released February 14, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 2, 2012 | !K7 Records

Back in the 1980s, we kids used to make cassette mixtapes for a couple of reasons: first, and most importantly, to flirt with the objects of our romantic desire. Second, to show off our musical sophistication -- nothing says "I'm hip" like having a piece of vegetarian propaganda by Flux of Pink Indians segue into an album track from Altered Images. With the Tapes series, the !K7 label seeks to revive the mixtape tradition, inviting artists as varied as the Rapture and Big Pink to put together programs with that approach in mind -- not to make a typical DJ mix, but to compile a track list as if it were intended for the two sides of a cassette tape. Foals' entry in the series succeeds at creating the old-school mood, but does so in a distinctly 21st century, not to say postmodern style. On "Side A" (the more song-oriented half of the program), you'll hear a track drawn from an obscure South African pop music compilation, the Gatto Fritto remix of Jr Seaton's "Way Savvy," and seemingly random entries from Blood Orange, Afro-pop drummer Tony Allen, and a lovely funk-soul number from Zap Mama leader Marie Daulne. Side B focuses more on house- and techno-based dance music and electronica, and features contributions from the likes of Caribou, Sepalcure, and the Congotronics crew Konono No. 1. The album ends on a blissfully uplifting note, with the Gospel Comforters' version of "Yes God Is Real." It all adds up to an exhilarating and at times revelatory mash-up of wildly varied flavors, like a really excellent fruit salad. ~ Rick Anderson
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Rock - Released March 7, 2019 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 12, 2007 | WM UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 2, 2008 | Transgressive Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 19, 2013 | WM UK

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Dance - Released September 16, 2016 | Warner Bros.

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 17, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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After the international chart success of 2013's Holy Fire, Foals officially embrace that album's rich, atmospheric post-punk revivalism over the rawer math rock tendencies of earlier LPs for their fourth full-length, What Went Down. Only ghostly traces of math rock remain on the album, such as when sustained synths wash over interlocking drum-guitar meters on the closer, "A Knife in the Ocean." The majority of the record avoids any prior levels of intricacy, opting instead for intense airiness in the form of passionate, danceable ruminations. Above all, the album is driving; even at relatively sleepier moments, drums kick in as if on cue and set any lost momentum back on track ("Give It All"). Vocalist Yannis Philippakis pushes his voice harder than ever before here, both in terms of range and strain, and his ability to at times resonate like Ian Curtis and soar like Bono is no small feat. The sparkling, rockin' title-track opener introduces his yowl with a clamoring swagger throughout the instrumentation, and with lyrics like "I buried my guilt in a pit in the sound/With the rust and the vultures and the trash downtown." Also vigorous, the particularly post-punky, motoric "Snake Oil" later plows straight into the lighter but rhythmically locomotive-like "Night Swimmers." There are calmer moments, like the slower, more spare "London Thunder ("I'm on the red-eye flight to nowhere good"), but the album's intensity and pulse remain. Ultimately, What Went Down should please fans of Holy Fire, and they may not be the only ones drawn to its gloomy and persistent energy. ~ Marcy Donelson