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Jazz - Released November 17, 2017 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released June 26, 2020 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released July 22, 2016 | Shanachie

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An industry veteran who first got his start as a session player for pop artists in the '80s, smooth jazz saxophonist Steve Grove (aka Euge Groove) marks his 16th year as a solo artist with his tenth studio album, 2016's Still Euge. This is Groove's fifth album for Shanachie, following 2014's Got 2 Be Groovin', and once again finds him handling the production duties. The result is a laid-back album with Groove's supple saxophone guiding the listener on a journey that never feels rushed. These are lush, if economic arrangements, built around light percussion rhythms, sinewy basslines, and a liberal mix of piano and keyboard. Cuts like the lead-off "Twelfth Night" and the finger-snapping "Let's Chill" are classic instrumental Euge numbers, while the sensual Groove-penned ballad "Love, Passion and Joy," sounds pleasingly like a relaxed smooth jazz take on Lenny Kravitz's "It Ain't Over 'til it's Over." Elsewhere, Groove showcases the talents of several guest artists, bringing guitarist Chuck Loeb on board for the bluesy title track and letting guitarist Peter White add his sparkling color to the sultry slow jam "Another Perfect Moment." Also welcome is singer Rahsaan Patterson, who lends his urbane vocal talents to the '90s-style R&B of "Much Love." Similarly, vocalist Oleta Adams adds some weighty resonance to the latter half of the album with her languid turn on the romantic "Flower." A warmly produced album that touches upon all of Groove's trademark sounds from soulful balladry to instrumental R&B jams, Still Euge is a more than apt title. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Narada

After searching for a more inspired way to indulge his chart-topping contemporary jazz sound, saxophonist/composer/arranger Euge Groove has created his most personal statement to date as an artist. On Born 2 Groove, the versatile saxophonist surrounds himself with an array of masterful gospel musicians who speak a completely different musical language. The result is ten brand new tracks, seven of which were recorded completely live. With special guest appearances by the great Jeffrey Osborne on "Baby If You Only Knew (What I Could Do)" and former Temptations lead singer Ali "Ollie" Woodson on "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," Groove should also gain even more appreciation for his musical interpretations from his ever-increasing R&B fan base. The song's themes range from the gently playful and laid-back feeling heard on the opening track "A Summer's Night Dream" to the beautiful Italian inspired imagery inherent in "Café del Soul" to the spiritual essence of "Religify." Groove flat out seduces you, moves you and grooves you on this record. Several of his performances, including "Slow Jam," "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," "Movin' On," the title track, and "Mr. Groove" reveal him as an accomplished, instinctive musician. His emotional solos and different chord voicings within a larger harmonic setting give him an edge over several of his generation's contemporary jazz counterparts. This CD is where the real players play. Fans of Euge Groove will experience a premium new sound set in HD digital technology that is filled with his incomparable saxophone voices, stirring gospel riffs and emotional, soulful vocals, all of which set a new standard for Groove's distinctive contemporary jazz sound. © Paula Edelstein /TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 27, 2009 | Shanachie

“With Groove, the song is central and emotion trumps technical prowess. It’s what keeps Groove’s hits coming.” © TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 18, 2000 | Warner Jazz

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Jazz - Released September 25, 2012 | Shanachie

The smooth jazz genre in the 2000s and 2010s has had two very vocal apostles in Kirk Whalum and Jonathan Butler, who made gospel albums to complement their more mainstream output, and have spoken freely on-stage about their faith. One who has done this more quietly, but no less eloquently, is Euge Groove, whose muscular tenor sax-doubling and lilting soprano have helped him score numerous radio hits and develop a ready-to-party audience as he subtly infuses a little church in the mix. In many ways, House of Groove falls right in line with the versatile saxman's core array of sounds -- dreamy, lilting, and sexy on the expansive opening track "Knock! Knock! Who's There?" and going for that dark-chorded, midtempo, doubled-tenor sizzle on the title track. One of the coolest elements that sets this collection apart is the length of the tracks, which allow him to offer rich solos to his bandmates -- most notably, the fiery Neal Schon-like guitar solo by John "Jubu" Smith on the hypnotic ballad "Indian Summer," and the stellar soloing throughout by keyboardist Tracy Carter. But the spiritual/emotional core of the songs calls to mind the vibe of his earlier release, Sunday Morning. There's the infectious invitation to the "Fellowship Hall," the simmering gospel ballad "God Bless You" (with graceful vocals by Kate Miner Moebel), the buoyant "Faithful Central" (a church in the Los Angeles area of which Carter has been musical director), and the gentle gospel/whispery soul vocal ballad "It's Only Rain," a passionate plea about keeping the faith. Another R&B-driven delight is "Never Met a Woman (Like You)," featuring the lighthearted coolness of genre great Jeffrey Osborne. House of Groove keeps its promised rhythms flowing, but the spiritual heart takes Groove's game to some exciting new places. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 19, 2019 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released July 2, 2002 | Warner Records

Steven Eugene Grove, aka Euge Groove, made quite a splash with his self-titled debut album in 2000, attracting enough attention to allow him to quit his day job as a saxophonist for hire for people like Tina Turner. His second smooth jazz release, Play Date, is more of the same and will please the same constituency of casual jazz fans and light FM stations. Again working closely with producer Paul Brown yet producing many of the tracks themselves this time, Grove and his writing partner, Michael Egizi, come up with percolating synthesized and programmed rhythm tracks over which Grove solos melodically. Nothing to write home about in that, of course, except that they vary the formula just a little on just about every track. On "From the Top," Chester Thompson contributes some tasty Hammond B-3 playing; the slow-tempo "Gonna B Alright" gives way to a cover of Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On" that employs enough familiar elements from the original arrangement to recall it without replicating it; "Love Me," the obligatory vocal number, has a sexy chorus sung by Stacy Campbell; "Belle Maria" features Peter White, who adds Spanish guitar, creating a different feel; Grove switches from tenor to soprano on the title tune; and "With You I'd Believe," featuring some delicate acoustic and electric guitar work from Dean Parks, and on which Grove plays alto, has an attractive melody that is crying out for a lyric to turn it into an adult contemporary hit. The varying tones of the disc make for an enjoyable listening experience whether one is paying close attention or not, which is a key to successful smooth jazz. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Narada

The sophomore release on Narada's jazz imprint for Tower of Power's former saxman Euge Groove, Just Feels Right is an attempt to return to the music of 1976. The groove is the key to the whole, with a mix of funk, smooth jazz, and what almost sounds like quiet storm popping in from time to time. The album was made with a vintage ethic, using almost no gear made after 1976. The session musicians, as well, are from a different age, taking time to perfect the groove and lay out a nice backing rhythm. The compositions aren't particularly adventurous, but that's not really their purpose either. What they are is generally relaxed, simple works. The string arrangements can go a bit over the top at times, in full Love Unlimited Orchestra-style, but for the most part they hang back with a soft touch on the Hammond and all is well. A perfect album for a quiet groove in the background of a sunny drive. © Adam Greenberg /TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 19, 2014 | Shanachie

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Euge Groove (the stage name for saxophonist and ex-Tower of Power member Steve Grove) is the closest contemporary soul-jazz has to a superstar, and his groove-driven smooth pop-soul has continually topped the genre charts since his debut with a self-titled album in 2000. This set is his ninth album overall, and the fourth for Shanachie Records, and it features a solid core session band of Tracy Carter (keyboards), Cornelius Mims (bass), John "Jubu" Smith (guitar), Trevor Lawrence (drums), and Lenny Castro (percussion), with guest spots from Peter White, Althea Rene, Paul Brown, Elliot Yamin, and Chanel Haynes, whose vocal on "In Love with You" is one of the album's many highlights. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 17, 2011 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Narada

A few years prior to this release, veteran touring sideman Steve Grove (Richard Marx, Joe Cocker, Tina Turner) decided to stop hitting the road with pop legends to focus on his smooth jazz career. Despite securing a definite toehold for himself in the sax-heavy genre on the basis of a handful of hit radio singles, he ran into a roadblock with his previous label and jumped ship for the smaller but artist-friendly Narada Jazz. The fact that he's still committed to Livin' Large as a smoothie is reflected in his continued dedication to making picture-perfect sax records like this one. His trademark sound is horn texturing at just the right spots and sometimes on the hook of the song (a notion from his Tower of Power days, no doubt), as on the title track, which features some of his most muscular playing ever, or the midtempo funk of "XXL." Groove always offers a balance between the aggressive and romantic, and here finds the perfect blend on the retro-soul-inspired breathy moods of "Take You Higher" and "Too Cool." Producer Paul Brown (who produced tracks on Groove's first two albums) helps him find the '70s pop-soul vibe throughout, an influence directly addressed on the opening track, a shuffle groove cover of James Taylor's "Don't Let Me Be Lonely Tonight" and Sly Stone's "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)," presented in two versions, one instrumental and one with an autobiographical rap. Each has a party atmosphere, a slow-burning funk edge, and generous servings of that snazzy horn texturing. Groove intends his title to mean the idea of embracing life in general, but it also applies to the energy and appeal of this solid collection. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 15, 2020 | Shanachie

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Narada

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Narada

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Narada