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Jazz - Released October 29, 2010 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc Jazzman
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Jazz - Released September 29, 2010 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc Jazzman
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Jazz - Released March 9, 2007 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released November 3, 1999 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
An odd reissue of sorts, Bending New Corners combines tracks off two of trumpeter Erik Truffaz's previous albums. It is unclear why Blue Note felt the need to repackage these tracks yet again; however, here they are and they are worth a listen. Containing tracks from the sessions that produced The Mask and its European version, The Dream, Bending New Corners is a groove-oriented work that draws heavily on late-'60s and early-'70s Miles Davis. To these ends, Truffaz is a forward-thinking improviser with a plangent tone and knack for writing funky, modal compositions. Adding to the hip quotient, rapper Nya guests on a few tracks, delivering a gruff, philosophical vibe that is more G. Love than G Unit. Recorded in 1999, the tracks seem more connected to the post-rock, jazz-rap movements of the '90s; in the post-2000 world they don't feel as cutting edge as Truffaz would probably like them to seem. ~ Matt Collar
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Jazz - Released March 15, 1998 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released March 3, 2003 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions Elu par Citizen Jazz
French trumpeter Erik Truffaz began to gain U.S. recognition via two strong Blue Note discs, The Mask and Revisité. His third stateside release, Mantis, finds him again blending jazz with cutting-edge rhythms associated with drum'n'bass and hip-hop. But this time the lineup has changed, most notably with Manu Codjia's spiky, spacy electric guitar replacing Patrick Muller's Fender Rhodes piano. Double-bassist Michel Benita and drummer Philippe Garcia, also new faces, largely stick to the tripped-out rhythmic language typical of Truffaz's earlier efforts. In addition to the club music element, Truffaz incorporates Arabic influences on "Nina Valeria" and "Magrouni," the former a stark duet with oud player Anouar Brahem and the latter a showstopping feature for Tunisian vocalist Mounir Troudi. In another departure, Codjia switches to acoustic guitar for an especially lyrical duo with the leader called "Yasmina." Here, as well as on the melancholy 7/4 closer "Tahun Bahu," Truffaz seems to be going for a more organic sound, perhaps in part to shake off tiresome comparisons with electric Miles Davis. (Don't miss the hidden bonus track, a riotous instrumental version of "Magrouni.") ~ David R. Adler

Jazz - Released October 27, 2008 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions Choc Jazzman
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Contemporary Jazz - Released October 11, 2019 | Warner (France)

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It is impossible to be disappointed by an Erik Truffaz album when each recording by the trumpeter is such a rich, dense and especially exotic sensory journey. Lune rouge certainly does not break this rule, created with his regular collaborators Benoît Corboz, Marcello Giuliani and the drummer Arthur Hnatek. Vinyls from the past twenty years of the quartet’s work adorn the walls of the recording studio, not as trophies but rather as pieces of a mosaic still in process. “For this record, we wanted to try some new things. We entrusted Arthur Hnatek  to compose the base material from which the quartet was able to work some sounds, arrange and rearrange certain elements… We improvised a whole load of parts which acted as hinges between the compositions.” The final material is manipulated, stretched, cut then reassembled to obtain this enchanting soundtrack punctuated with rock here, some dub there, and ambient music elsewhere. Repetitive sequences gives way to lyrical passages, and Truffaz never forgets to include space and air into this idle music which subverts time, space and stylistic conventions. His efforts sometimes disconnect from the solid ground to try and reach the sky. His filiation with Miles Davis fades away more than ever. Magical. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 2, 2016 | Parlophone (France)

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Electronic - Released November 21, 2014 | Mundo Recordings

Jazz - Released January 15, 2016 | Parlophone (France)

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Jazz - Released January 17, 2005 | Parlophone (France)

Erik Truffaz is unusual for a jazz trumpeter in that he keeps his music open not only to early-'70s Miles Davis fusion but hip-hop, Indian music, and even bits of rap. Five of the dozen pieces on Saloua utilize one or two exotic-sounding singers who also rap a little. Otherwise the music is an eccentric brand of fusion that sometimes uses samples and various types of electronics. Truffaz manages to pull it off by not neglecting his trumpet playing (unlike say Donald Byrd in his mid-'70s funk/fusion/pop efforts) and being creative no matter what the mixture of idioms. Still, only truly open-minded listeners will be interested in his music. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released October 31, 2008 | Parlophone (France)

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Jazz - Released February 25, 2005 | Parlophone (France)

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Jazz - Released February 24, 2006 | Parlophone (France)

Jazz - Released October 27, 2008 | Parlophone (France)

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Jazz - Released March 30, 2003 | Parlophone (France)

French trumpeter Erik Truffaz has been a mover and shaker on the European creative improvisational scene since the mid-'90s. With the release of The Mask (a compilation of three previously released recordings: Out of a Dream, The Dawn, and Bending New Corners), Revisité (a DJ dance remix of The Mask), and 2002's forward-sounding Mantis, Truffaz became one of the most popular electronic jazz trumpeters to hit North America since Norwegian trumpeter Nils Petter Molvaer charged forth with Khmer and Solid Ether. With the release of The Walk of the Giant Turtle, Truffaz and his quartet continue to make their mark as an improvisationally rich, high-energy groove experience. The two-part dance track "Scody" features the trumpeter coolly blowing around fluid trance grooves that flow as a mellow confluence of drum'n'bass rhythms and muted electric trumpet. The rock-fueled backgrounds of Truffaz and bassist Marcello Giuliani provide the impetus for "King B," "Next Door," and "Seven Skies," while such lyrical beauties as "Wilfried" and the captivating title tune provide contrasting musical entertainment that respects your intelligence and appeals to your curiosity even though this set is not that cerebral. With traditional styles set aside, this ten-track collection is rife with serious chops, electric jazz infused with modern dance rhythms, ambient pop, and gripping rock/jazz fusion performances that you are sure to enjoy. So kick back or get out on the dance floor -- it's your pick. ~ Paula Edelstein
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Jazz - Released July 12, 2019 | Warner (France)

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Jazz - Released October 27, 2008 | Parlophone (France)

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Jazz - Released February 25, 2005 | Parlophone (France)

The seven tracks on Revisité are "remixes" of tunes that Erik Truffaz, the adventurous French trumpeter, previously explored with his jazz quartet. In a bid to crosspollinate jazz with new sounds being explored in ambient and electronica, Truffaz enlists the talents of six guest artists to reinterpret his work through their own experimental points of view. Like Truffaz himself, these musical seekers hail from Europe -- Pierre Audétat, Alex Gopher, Pierre Henry, Goo, and Bugge Wesseltoft, as well as Mobile in Motion (Christophe Calpini and Fred Hashadourian), which splits "The Dawn" into two parts that respectively open and close the album. There's a mellow, even minimalistic vibe to much of the music, with the possible exception of Alex Gopher's party-worthy "Bending New Corners." Truffaz's sparse trumpet work over these electronic loops and grooves does, of course, recall Miles Davis, but what's interesting about this record, and others like it, is that it signifies a new direction in music -- not a throwback to fusion, not a concession to commercial pressures, but a fecund meeting of some very different yet complementary musical minds. Wesseltoft's dark blend of Rhodes, acoustic bass, drum samples, and rap vocal snippets on "Sweet Mercy" represents a new kind of musical mosaic, an idea with a very promising future. ~ David R. Adler