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Ambient/New Age - Released October 12, 2018 | Polydor Records

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If we were to travel back in time and tell young 19-year-old Eric, who had just left The Yardbirds because he felt their For Your Love sounded too pop, that he would one day record a Christmas album, he wouldn’t believe us for a second and would threaten to knock us out with his guitar! It’s a fact; 73-year-old Clapton is a changed man. Not only has he overcome many hardships, but he also appears serene and relaxed, at last enjoying family life with real holiday celebrations by the fireplace. He therefore has every right to offer his own version of such classics as White Christmas, Silent Night or Away In A Manger (Once In Royal David’s City), and less mainstream titles like Sentimental Moments (1955 by Joan Bennett), Lonesome Christmas (by Lowell Fulson and later covered by B.B. King and Joe Bonamassa) or Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas that was interpreted by Judy Garland and Frank Sinatra, and was also featured on the Jackson 5’s Christmas album (when little Michael was twelve). Even Chrissie Hynde sang it with The Pretenders, that’s saying a lot…Eric Clapton even composed his own Christmas song, For Love On Christmas Day. It blends in perfectly with the “Christmas tree and wreath” decor and is fully “Claptonised” with a high dose of top-notch blues. The sole, highly surprising exception is the EDM-style Jingle Bells dedicated to DJ Avicii, whose passing particularly affected Eric as he drew parallels to his own self-destructive youth. And surprise, Clapton himself drew the joyful Santa on the album cover (a self-portrait?). Now you have something to put in a few stockings for Christmas… © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 28, 2015 | Reprise

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Rock - Released November 6, 1989 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 5, 2002 | Reprise

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Pop - Released March 9, 1998 | Reprise

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Blues - Released January 1, 2012 | Universal Music Group International

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Rock - Released August 20, 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released March 6, 2001 | Reprise

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Rock - Released November 1, 1978 | Polydor Records

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With his 6th studio album (1978), Eric Clapton broke a cycle in his solo career: it was the last time that he used the musicians he started with. On Blackless, JJ Cale came back to compose I’ll Make Love To You Anytime while Bob Dylan wrote two tracks. After many well made albums, Clapton seemed to be in a little lack of inspiration. Even if the majority of the songs are paradise for guitar players, they might not seduce people that do not care much about that instrument. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 24, 2010 | Reprise

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Ambient/New Age - Released October 12, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
If we were to travel back in time and tell young 19-year-old Eric, who had just left The Yardbirds because he felt their For Your Love sounded too pop, that he would one day record a Christmas album, he wouldn’t believe us for a second and would threaten to knock us out with his guitar! It’s a fact; 73-year-old Clapton is a changed man. Not only has he overcome many hardships, but he also appears serene and relaxed, at last enjoying family life with real holiday celebrations by the fireplace. He therefore has every right to offer his own version of such classics as White Christmas, Silent Night or Away In A Manger (Once In Royal David’s City), and less mainstream titles like Sentimental Moments (1955 by Joan Bennett), Lonesome Christmas (by Lowell Fulson and later covered by B.B. King and Joe Bonamassa) or Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas that was interpreted by Judy Garland and Frank Sinatra, and was also featured on the Jackson 5’s Christmas album (when little Michael was twelve). Even Chrissie Hynde sang it with The Pretenders, that’s saying a lot…Eric Clapton even composed his own Christmas song, For Love On Christmas Day. It blends in perfectly with the “Christmas tree and wreath” decor and is fully “Claptonised” with a high dose of top-notch blues. The sole, highly surprising exception is the EDM-style Jingle Bells dedicated to DJ Avicii, whose passing particularly affected Eric as he drew parallels to his own self-destructive youth. And surprise, Clapton himself drew the joyful Santa on the album cover (a self-portrait?). Now you have something to put in a few stockings for Christmas… © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 8, 1991 | Reprise

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

Disregard the title of this 2007 compilation: there is no way that any double-disc, 36-track set could be called The Complete Clapton, not when Eric Clapton has had a career that's spanned over four decades. This doesn't even attempt to cover as much ground as his landmark four-disc 1988 box set Crossroads, which began with his first band the Yardbirds and then followed his winding journeys through John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Delaney & Bonnie, and Derek & the Dominos before settling into his solo records. Of course, The Complete Clapton covers the nearly 20 years that have elapsed since the release of Crossroads, a time frame which includes the blockbuster success of his 1992 Unplugged, its all-blues 1994 follow-up From the Cradle, and many soft adult contemporary hits from the late '90s. All these phases are touched upon on The Complete Clapton, but the set lops off all of Clapton's earliest recordings, beginning with five Cream staples ("I Feel Free," "Sunshine of Your Love," "White Room," "Crossroads," "Badge") and Blind Faith's "Presence of the Lord" before delving into his solo career. This turns The Complete Clapton into a portrait of Clapton the classic rocker, as it focuses almost entirely on radio staples -- including tracks like "I've Got a Rock & Roll Heart," "Forever Man," and "It's in the Way That You Use It" that didn't make the cut on Crossroads -- that still are played frequently years after their original release. As such, this set doesn't pack many surprises, but it does hit the obvious highlights well and serves as a good hits package for the casual and curious fan, and in that sense, it works as a good companion piece to Clapton's autobiography, which was published the same week this was released in October 2007. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 1, 1975 | Polydor Records

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The middle of the 70’s is the golden era of Clapton’s career. In 1975, only one year after he released the great 461 Ocean Boulevard, was published There’s One In Every Crowd. Because of the huge success of the I Shot The Sheriff cover, Clapton and his crew went straight back to Jamaica to record this LP. Unfortunately, because of Clapton’s drugs dependence the sessions were sometimes complicated. However, they managed to create a record with a nice potential. With some reggae tunes (Swing Low, Swing Chariot, Little Rachet or Don’t Blame me), There’s One In Every Crowd remains mainly a rock / blues album. With less infinite solos, the artist focuses on the melody and the lyrics instead to show off with his virtuosity. © AR/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 1994 | Polydor Records

Eric Clapton was contracted to Polydor Records from 1966 to 1981, first as a member of Cream, then Blind Faith, and later as a solo artist and as the leader of Derek and the Dominos. The 19-track, 79-minute Cream of Clapton disc surveys his career, presenting an excellent selection from the period, including the Cream hits "Sunshine of Your Love," "White Room," and "Crossroads"; "Presence of the Lord," Clapton's finest moment with Blind Faith; "Bell Bottom Blues" and "Layla" from Derek and the Dominos; and 11 songs from Clapton's solo work, among them the hits "I Shot the Sheriff," "Promises," and "I Can't Stand It." The selection is thus broader and better than that found on 1982's Time Pieces collection, and with excellent sound and liner notes by Clapton biographer Ray Coleman, The Cream of Clapton stands as the single-disc best-of to own for Clapton's greatest recordings. [Not to be confused with the popular 1987 Polydor (U.K.) compilation The Cream of Eric Clapton.] © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Blues - Released March 23, 2004 | Reprise

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Rock - Released September 6, 1994 | Reprise

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Pop - Released January 1, 1986 | Reprise

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Rock - Released June 8, 2018 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

In 1991, Eric Clapton finished the music for the film Rush by Lili Fini Zanuck. A few months earlier, he had lost Conor, his four-year-old son, and dedicated Tears In Heaven to him. Just as it closed Rush, that piece provids the finale to Life in 12 bars, a documentary on the musician's life, made by Lili Fini Zanuck, best known for her Oscar-winning Driving Miss Daisy. There are already quite a few Clapton compilations, but this one is of particular importance. For sure, there are only four "rarities", like a high-quality live take of Cream (Spoonful, recorded at the Forum in Los Angeles on 19 October 1969), an instrumental studio take from Derek And The Dominos of High, a piece that he would eventually perform solo on There's One In Every Crowd, a long version (6:50 instead of 4:26) of the Bob Marley cover I Shot The Sheriff, a result of the 461 Ocean Boulevard (1974) sessions, and finally a pretty fun live take of Little Queenie by Chuck Berry, at the Arena in Long Beach from July 1974, in the middle of Clapton's "sozzled" period But the aim was to capture, across 32 pieces, the Clapton epic, spanning two decades, without getting too hung up on details. Or indeed on output after 1974, apart from Tears In Heaven. With a fairly exhaustive and balanced selection, although the idea of "balance" is very subjective, especially when applied to such an elusive figure, Life In 12 Bars starts with three evocations of Clapton's blues roots (Big Bill Broonzy and Muddy Waters); before moving on, unsurprisingly, to two pieces by the Yardbirds, including the very poppy For Your Love, the fundamental reason for his departure from the group; two pieces with John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers; eight with Cream; one with Blind Faith; one with Delaney & Bonnie & Friends; seven with Derek And The Dominos; six solo and, a big first, three important collaborations. With Aretha Franklin (Good To Me As I Am To You, on his 1967 Lady Soul), the Beatles (While My Guitar Gently Weeps, on The Beatles, in 1968) and George Harrison. And while his part on the immortal My Sweet Lord (All Things Must Pass, 1970) is a little less prominent than some of his other performances, although he certainly played on it. Equally discreet was his role on Badge by Cream, or Roll It Over by Derek And The Dominos, which it would have made for judicious inclusions. Likewise, it would have been a good idea to look at the famous collaboration with John Lennon and his Plastic Ono band in the late 1960s, or indeed with the Dirty Mac (Lennon, Keith Richards, Mitch Mitchell) on The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus in 1968... © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz 
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R&B - Released June 13, 2000 | Reprise

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Eric Clapton in the magazine