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Rock - Released January 1, 1977 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released October 11, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1980 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Polydor Records

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Right after he finished a tour with the Delaney & Bonnie couple, Clapton ended the collaboration because of a fight with them. Nevertheless, his creativity had not left him so he decided to go through a solo adventure and made a perfect start as a leader. Eric Clapton was released in 1970 after recording sessions in Los Angeles and London. Pop oriented, this album is still influenced by gospel and r’n’b which produces a diverse musical experience. Brownie, Clapton’s first Stratocaster is the main guitar used on the record, even though the guitarist is able to take care of some other on acoustic track (Easy Now). The legend is on its way. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 5, 2002 | Reprise

The cover of Eric Clapton's 2002 live album One More Car, One More Rider -- no less than the sixth live album in his solo career -- suggests the problems in the record. It's designed to look a classic blues album sleeve or poster, but it's self-conscious and affected, the work of somebody that knows the form but not the substance of the blues. Certainly that accusation can't be reasonably leveled at Clapton who, after all, has proved throughout his career that he knows the substance of the blues, but ever since his canonization to the MOR mainstream with 1992's Unplugged, there's a sinking feeling that EC dabbles in the blues instead of lives there. Sure, he had a fierce testimonial to his favorite music with From the Cradle, but One More Car, One More Rider arrives nearly a decade later, and the difference is stunning. Though he goes through the motions of playing the blues -- a cutting version of the perennial "Key to the Highway," "Hoochie Coochie Man," "Goin' Down Slow," among others here -- the heart of this album is closer to the NPR instrumental jam of "Reptile" than blues. This is mannered, "classy" playing which sounds perfectly fine but is never interesting, particularly since the song selection favors either warhorses or recent hits. In short, it's a record for those that like the idea of Clapton more than his music. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1978 | Polydor Records

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With his 6th studio album (1978), Eric Clapton broke a cycle in his solo career: it was the last time that he used the musicians he started with. On Blackless, JJ Cale came back to compose I’ll Make Love To You Anytime while Bob Dylan wrote two tracks. After many well made albums, Clapton seemed to be in a little lack of inspiration. Even if the majority of the songs are paradise for guitar players, they might not seduce people that do not care much about that instrument. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 6, 1989 | Rhino

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released March 6, 2001 | Reprise

For a musician known to strive for authenticity, Eric Clapton has always been curiously obsessed with appearances, seemingly as interested in sartorial details and hairstyles as in the perfect guitar lick. It's hard to find two photographs of him from the 1960s and early '70s that appear to be the same person, and even after he formally launched his solo career he switched looks frequently. Thus, the album sleeve of his 13th solo studio album of new material, Reptile, its "concept" credited to the recording artist, seems significant. The album cover shows a smiling Clapton as a child, and there are family photographs on the back cover and in the booklet, along with a current photograph of the artist, who turned 56 in the weeks following the album's release, in an image that does nothing to hide the wrinkles of late middle age. This photograph faces a sleeve note by Clapton that begins with his explanation of the album title: "Where I come from, the word 'reptile' is a term of endearment, used in much the same way as 'toe rag' or 'moosh.'" (Thanks, Eric. Now, all listeners have to do is find out what "toe rag" and "moosh" mean!) The note then goes on to dedicate the album warmly to Clapton's uncle. All of this might lead you to expect an unusually personal recording from a man who has always spoken most eloquently with his guitar. If so, you'd be disappointed. Reptile seems conceived as an album to address all the disparate audiences Clapton has assembled over the years. His core audience may think of him as the premier blues guitarist of his generation, but especially as a solo artist, he has also sought a broader pop identity, and in the 1990s, with the hits "Tears in Heaven" and "Change the World," he achieved it. The fans he earned then will recognize the largely acoustic sound of such songs as "Believe in Life," "Second Nature," and "Modern Girl." But those who think of Clapton as the guy who plays "Cocaine" will be pleased with his cover of another J.J. Cale song, "Travelin' Light," and by the time the album was in record stores mainstream rock radio had already found "Superman Inside," which sounds like many of his mid-tempo rock hits of the '80s. This diversity is continued on less familiar material, especially the many interesting cover songs. Somebody, perhaps the artist himself, has been busy looking for old chestnuts, since Reptile contains a wide variety of them: the 1930 jazz song "I Want a Little Girl," recorded by McKinney's Cotton Pickers among others; John Greer's 1952 R&B hit "Got You on My Mind"; Ray Charles' 1955 R&B hit "Come Back Baby"; James Taylor's 1972 hit "Don't Let Me Be Lonely Tonight"; and Stevie Wonder's 1980 hit "I Ain't Gonna Stand for It." The two earliest of these songs are old and obscure enough that Clapton is able to make them his own, and he recasts the Taylor song enough to re-invent it, but remaking songs by Charles and Wonder means competing with them vocally, and as a singer Clapton isn't up to the challenge. He is assisted by the current five-man version of the Impressions, who do much to shore up his vocal weaknesses, but he still isn't a disciplined or thoughtful singer. Of course, when that distinctive electric guitar sound kicks in, all is forgiven. Still, Reptile looks like an album that started out to be more ambitious than it ended up being. There may be a song here for each of the artist's constituencies (and, more important to its commercial impact, for every major radio format except talk and country), but as a whole the album doesn't add up to the statement Clapton seems to have been hoping to make. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 8, 1991 | Reprise

Eric Clapton, who had not released a live album since 1980, had several good reasons to release one in the early '90s. For one thing, his spare backup band of keyboardist Greg Phillinganes, bassist Nathan East, and drummer Steve Ferrone was his best live unit ever, and its powerful live versions of Cream classics like "White Room" and "Sunshine of Your Love" deserved to be documented. For another, since 1987 Clapton had been playing an annual series of concerts at the Royal Albert Hall in London, putting together various special shows (blues nights, orchestral nights, etc.). 24 Nights, a double album, was culled from two years of such shows, 1990 and 1991, and it demonstrated the breadth of Clapton's work, from his hot regular band to assemblages of bluesmen like Buddy Guy and Robert Cray to examples of his soundtrack work with an orchestra led by Michael Kamen. The result was an album that came across as a lavishly constructed retrospective and a testament to Clapton's musical stature. But it made little impact upon release (though it quickly went gold), perhaps because events overcame it -- three months later, Clapton's elegy for his baby son, "Tears in Heaven," was all over the radio, and a few months after that he was redefining himself on MTV Unplugged -- a live show as austere as 24 Nights was grand. Still, it would be hard to find a more thorough demonstration of Clapton's abilities than the one presented here. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Another Ticket is the first album that Clapton recorded for a major after he signed a contract for Warner. The album was composed as a tribute to Carl Radle (Clapton’s bass player who was fired by Slowhand and who did an overdose). For the first time, Clapton brought two keyboards and embraced the 80’s trend. With a full American sound, God opened his music to a wider public. Of course, Floating Bridge reminds that Clapton is into his universe when he plays the blues. Rita Mae was recorded while Clapton and the other guitar player were jamming. Another Ticket is a well made album that opened the path to a new beginning in Clapton’s career. © AR/Qobuz 
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Rock - Released January 1, 1975 | Polydor Records

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Right after he came out of detox due to his problems related to drugs and alcohol, the one who will become know as God published a live album. E.C. Was Here is made of recordings from the guitar player’s 1974 tour (Long Beach Arena, Hammersmith Odeon, Providence Civic Center…). After a first album recorded with Brownie, Clapton decided to come on stage with his Gibson for a fuller, more powerful sound. Focusing on a blues repertory, E.C. Was Here is fantastic: on his playground, Slowhand impresses and leads the discussions with George Terry. A cover of Ramblin’ On My Mind (Robert Johnson), an acoustic Driftin’ Blues, a long moaning on Have You Ever Loved A Woman… The content is linked together at lightning speed and when album ends, the first desire is to start it again. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released February 10, 2020 | BBM2

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World - Released December 12, 2019 | MP Digital

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Rock - Released April 1, 2020 | Cult Legends

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Rock - Released April 13, 2020 | 3 Amigos

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Rock - Released January 1, 1981 | Polydor Records

Now, here's a star-crossed album. Polydor rejected the first version of it, produced by Glyn Johns, and Eric Clapton was forced to cut it all over again with Tom Dowd. Then, a few dates into a U.S. promotional tour coinciding with its release, Clapton collapsed and was found to be near death from ulcers due to his alcoholism. Finally, it turned out to be the final record of his 15-year association with Polydor, which therefore had no reason to promote it. Nevertheless, the album made the Top Ten, went gold, and spawned a Top Ten single in "I Can't Stand It." And the rest of it wasn't too shabby, either. The first and last Clapton studio album to feature his all-British band of the early '80s, it gave considerable prominence to second guitarist Albert Lee and especially to keyboard player/singer Gary Brooker (formerly leader of Procol Harum), and they gave it more of a blues-rock feel than the country-funk brewed up by the Tulsa shuffle crew Clapton had used throughout the 1970s. Best of all, Clapton had taken the time to write some songs -- he's credited on six of the nine selections -- and tunes such as the title track and "I Can't Stand It" held up well. This wasn't great Clapton, but it was good, and it deserved more recognition than conditions allowed it at the time. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 6, 2019 | Blackfen

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Rock - Released September 29, 2014 | 2014 Autarc Media GmbH, CH.

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Eric Clapton in the magazine
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