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Rock - Released January 1, 1974 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released March 25, 2013 | Polydor Records

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Switching from a major to his own Bushbranch imprint on Gary Hoey's independent SurfDog label is, to the say least, a little unexpected from Eric Clapton, but now that he's reached the ripe old age of 67, the guitarist isn't so concerned with proving himself. On Old Sock, his 20th studio album, he sounds downright happy to be slowly dropping off of the mainstream radar, not bothering with any music that could conceivably be called pop, or even writing his own songs. Only two of the 12 songs on Old Sock are new, and he didn't write either himself; they're co-writes between his longtime right-hand man Doyle Bramhall II, Nikki Costa, and Justin Stanley, and the vaguely propulsive blues-rock of "Gotta Get Over" and cheerful lite reggae bounce "Every Little Thing" fit neatly into the sunny nostalgia offered on the rest of the record. And "sunny" describes Clapton's sound, mood, and styles here, as he favors reggae over the blues, turning both Otis Redding's "Your One and Only Man" and Taj Mahal's "Further On Down the Road" into lilting bits of sunsplash, covering Peter Tosh's "Till Your Well Runs Dry," and getting so besotted with good cheer on "Every Little Thing" he brings in a bunch of kids to sing the closing chorus, a jarring addition that treads the border of good taste. When Clapton does dip into the blues, it's on a grandiose "Still Got the Blues," a tribute to the late (and somewhat underappreciated) British blues guitarist Gary Moore, so it's clear his heart now lies elsewhere, namely shuffling along with Paul McCartney to "All of Me" and knocking out Leadbelly's "Goodnight Irene" as a front porch singalong. Clapton indulged in this shameless, warm-hearted celebration of the past on 2010's Eric Clapton, but that album bore all the hallmarks of a carefully considered major-label effort: the sound was immaculate and the song selection had the well-considered thrust of a history lesson. Here, he leaves all those classy trappings behind, picks up his guitar and plays a bunch of songs he likes, maybe even loves. It's not an especially compelling reason to make an album but it's not a bad one, either, and the same can be said about the experience of listening to Old Sock: it's a pleasurable way to while away the time. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 8, 2013 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1974 | Polydor Records

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461 Ocean Boulevard is Eric Clapton's second studio solo album, arriving after his side project of Derek and the Dominos and a long struggle with heroin addiction. Although there are some new reggae influences, the album doesn't sound all that different from the rock, pop, blues, country, and R&B amalgam of Eric Clapton. However, 461 Ocean Boulevard is a tighter, more focused outing that enables Clapton to stretch out instrumentally. Furthermore, the pop concessions on the album -- the sleek production, the concise running times -- don't detract from the rootsy origins of the material, whether it's Johnny Otis' "Willie and the Hand Jive," the traditional blues "Motherless Children," Bob Marley's "I Shot the Sheriff," or Clapton's emotional original "Let It Grow." With its relaxed, friendly atmosphere and strong bluesy roots, 461 Ocean Boulevard set the template for Clapton's '70s albums. Though he tried hard to make an album exactly like it, he never quite managed to replicate its charms. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1977 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1980 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released May 20, 2016 | Polydor Records

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Sharp as ever on the guitar, fingers full of feeling and emotion... Like a fine wine, the 71-year-old legend continues to evolve, adding tasty notes and nuances to an already well-stocked palette. To assume his entry into the prime of his life, the English prodigy has concocted a return to the source. Firstly, he decided to work with producer Glyn Johns. In the golden age of British rock music, he produced The Who as well as the the mythical album Sticky Fingers by The Rolling Stones. He was also sound engineer for the no less famous LP Led Zeppelin I. ‘God’ then brought together a number of musicians with whom he is familiar: Henry Spinetti, Dave Bronze, Paul Carrack and Andy Faiweather Low... An interesting anecdote to emphasize the nostalgia that envelops this album’s content, it is the artist Sir Peter Blake who sketched Clapton’s portrait for this album was also the artist behind the innovative cover of the famous Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.Successfully mixed, well-dosed as always and smooth in its’ composition, I Still Do offers a pleasant listen from start to finish and will see fans carried away with each note played on ‘Blacky’, Clapton’s Stratocaster. We very quickly understand Clapton’s urge to splurge on the musical style he holds dear: the Blues. Alabama Woman Blues, originally written by Leroy Caar, is a hymn to the genre: tempo slowed, swaying piano, harmonica, slide guitar and saturation, melancholy... The first track transports us into a wistful Chicago, at a time when whiskey was still prohibited... Muddy Waters would have been proud. We find this atmosphere in Cypress Grove (Skip James cover), and to a lesser extent, British Spiral or Stones In My Passway. Just back in a new decade, Eric Clapton offers a quality album, and even mark a little music footprint. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Polydor Records

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If we were to travel back in time and tell young 19-year-old Eric, who had just left The Yardbirds because he felt their For Your Love sounded too pop, that he would one day record a Christmas album, he wouldn’t believe us for a second and would threaten to knock us out with his guitar! It’s a fact; 73-year-old Clapton is a changed man. Not only has he overcome many hardships, but he also appears serene and relaxed, at last enjoying family life with real holiday celebrations by the fireplace. He therefore has every right to offer his own version of such classics as White Christmas, Silent Night or Away In A Manger (Once In Royal David’s City), and less mainstream titles like Sentimental Moments (1955 by Joan Bennett), Lonesome Christmas (by Lowell Fulson and later covered by B.B. King and Joe Bonamassa) or Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas that was interpreted by Judy Garland and Frank Sinatra, and was also featured on the Jackson 5’s Christmas album (when little Michael was twelve). Even Chrissie Hynde sang it with The Pretenders, that’s saying a lot…Eric Clapton even composed his own Christmas song, For Love On Christmas Day. It blends in perfectly with the “Christmas tree and wreath” decor and is fully “Claptonised” with a high dose of top-notch blues. The sole, highly surprising exception is the EDM-style Jingle Bells dedicated to DJ Avicii, whose passing particularly affected Eric as he drew parallels to his own self-destructive youth. And surprise, Clapton himself drew the joyful Santa on the album cover (a self-portrait?). Now you have something to put in a few stockings for Christmas… © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Polydor Records

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Right after he finished a tour with the Delaney & Bonnie couple, Clapton ended the collaboration because of a fight with them. Nevertheless, his creativity had not left him so he decided to go through a solo adventure and made a perfect start as a leader. Eric Clapton was released in 1970 after recording sessions in Los Angeles and London. Pop oriented, this album is still influenced by gospel and r’n’b which produces a diverse musical experience. Brownie, Clapton’s first Stratocaster is the main guitar used on the record, even though the guitarist is able to take care of some other on acoustic track (Easy Now). The legend is on its way. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1978 | Polydor Records

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With his 6th studio album (1978), Eric Clapton broke a cycle in his solo career: it was the last time that he used the musicians he started with. On Blackless, JJ Cale came back to compose I’ll Make Love To You Anytime while Bob Dylan wrote two tracks. After many well made albums, Clapton seemed to be in a little lack of inspiration. Even if the majority of the songs are paradise for guitar players, they might not seduce people that do not care much about that instrument. © AR/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 1994 | Polydor Records

Eric Clapton was contracted to Polydor Records from 1966 to 1981, first as a member of Cream, then Blind Faith, and later as a solo artist and as the leader of Derek and the Dominos. The 19-track, 79-minute Cream of Clapton disc surveys his career, presenting an excellent selection from the period, including the Cream hits "Sunshine of Your Love," "White Room," and "Crossroads"; "Presence of the Lord," Clapton's finest moment with Blind Faith; "Bell Bottom Blues" and "Layla" from Derek and the Dominos; and 11 songs from Clapton's solo work, among them the hits "I Shot the Sheriff," "Promises," and "I Can't Stand It." The selection is thus broader and better than that found on 1982's Time Pieces collection, and with excellent sound and liner notes by Clapton biographer Ray Coleman, The Cream of Clapton stands as the single-disc best-of to own for Clapton's greatest recordings. [Not to be confused with the popular 1987 Polydor (U.K.) compilation The Cream of Eric Clapton.] © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Records

Disregard the title of this 2007 compilation: there is no way that any double-disc, 36-track set could be called The Complete Clapton, not when Eric Clapton has had a career that's spanned over four decades. This doesn't even attempt to cover as much ground as his landmark four-disc 1988 box set Crossroads, which began with his first band the Yardbirds and then followed his winding journeys through John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Delaney & Bonnie, and Derek & the Dominos before settling into his solo records. Of course, The Complete Clapton covers the nearly 20 years that have elapsed since the release of Crossroads, a time frame which includes the blockbuster success of his 1992 Unplugged, its all-blues 1994 follow-up From the Cradle, and many soft adult contemporary hits from the late '90s. All these phases are touched upon on The Complete Clapton, but the set lops off all of Clapton's earliest recordings, beginning with five Cream staples ("I Feel Free," "Sunshine of Your Love," "White Room," "Crossroads," "Badge") and Blind Faith's "Presence of the Lord" before delving into his solo career. This turns The Complete Clapton into a portrait of Clapton the classic rocker, as it focuses almost entirely on radio staples -- including tracks like "I've Got a Rock & Roll Heart," "Forever Man," and "It's in the Way That You Use It" that didn't make the cut on Crossroads -- that still are played frequently years after their original release. As such, this set doesn't pack many surprises, but it does hit the obvious highlights well and serves as a good hits package for the casual and curious fan, and in that sense, it works as a good companion piece to Clapton's autobiography, which was published the same week this was released in October 2007. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Polydor Records

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If we were to travel back in time and tell young 19-year-old Eric, who had just left The Yardbirds because he felt their For Your Love sounded too pop, that he would one day record a Christmas album, he wouldn’t believe us for a second and would threaten to knock us out with his guitar! It’s a fact; 73-year-old Clapton is a changed man. Not only has he overcome many hardships, but he also appears serene and relaxed, at last enjoying family life with real holiday celebrations by the fireplace. He therefore has every right to offer his own version of such classics as White Christmas, Silent Night or Away In A Manger (Once In Royal David’s City), and less mainstream titles like Sentimental Moments (1955 by Joan Bennett), Lonesome Christmas (by Lowell Fulson and later covered by B.B. King and Joe Bonamassa) or Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas that was interpreted by Judy Garland and Frank Sinatra, and was also featured on the Jackson 5’s Christmas album (when little Michael was twelve). Even Chrissie Hynde sang it with The Pretenders, that’s saying a lot…Eric Clapton even composed his own Christmas song, For Love On Christmas Day. It blends in perfectly with the “Christmas tree and wreath” decor and is fully “Claptonised” with a high dose of top-notch blues. The sole, highly surprising exception is the EDM-style Jingle Bells dedicated to DJ Avicii, whose passing particularly affected Eric as he drew parallels to his own self-destructive youth. And surprise, Clapton himself drew the joyful Santa on the album cover (a self-portrait?). Now you have something to put in a few stockings for Christmas… © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1975 | Polydor Records

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The middle of the 70’s is the golden era of Clapton’s career. In 1975, only one year after he released the great 461 Ocean Boulevard, was published There’s One In Every Crowd. Because of the huge success of the I Shot The Sheriff cover, Clapton and his crew went straight back to Jamaica to record this LP. Unfortunately, because of Clapton’s drugs dependence the sessions were sometimes complicated. However, they managed to create a record with a nice potential. With some reggae tunes (Swing Low, Swing Chariot, Little Rachet or Don’t Blame me), There’s One In Every Crowd remains mainly a rock / blues album. With less infinite solos, the artist focuses on the melody and the lyrics instead to show off with his virtuosity. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Another Ticket is the first album that Clapton recorded for a major after he signed a contract for Warner. The album was composed as a tribute to Carl Radle (Clapton’s bass player who was fired by Slowhand and who did an overdose). For the first time, Clapton brought two keyboards and embraced the 80’s trend. With a full American sound, God opened his music to a wider public. Of course, Floating Bridge reminds that Clapton is into his universe when he plays the blues. Rita Mae was recorded while Clapton and the other guitar player were jamming. Another Ticket is a well made album that opened the path to a new beginning in Clapton’s career. © AR/Qobuz 
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Rock - Released January 1, 1975 | Polydor Records

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Right after he came out of detox due to his problems related to drugs and alcohol, the one who will become know as God published a live album. E.C. Was Here is made of recordings from the guitar player’s 1974 tour (Long Beach Arena, Hammersmith Odeon, Providence Civic Center…). After a first album recorded with Brownie, Clapton decided to come on stage with his Gibson for a fuller, more powerful sound. Focusing on a blues repertory, E.C. Was Here is fantastic: on his playground, Slowhand impresses and leads the discussions with George Terry. A cover of Ramblin’ On My Mind (Robert Johnson), an acoustic Driftin’ Blues, a long moaning on Have You Ever Loved A Woman… The content is linked together at lightning speed and when album ends, the first desire is to start it again. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | Polydor Records

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Eric Clapton in the magazine
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