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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2004 | EMI Marketing

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Released in 1986, this Roland Joffé film with Robert de Niro and Jeremy Irons recounts the conscience tragedy that befell the Jesuits in the 18th century when they were forced to abandon their mission on the Guaraní in South America. As is often the case with Ennio Morricone, the score he wrote is witness to the successful marriage of a certain classicism and other external elements (namely multicultural) that are grafted together. The introductory track (appearing in the end credits) embodies this aesthetic with extraordinary force and emotion: we encounter a celestial indigenous choir, tribal percussions, as well as a mystical oboe (On Earth as it is in Heaven). On Falls, it is a mysterious and spellbinding pan flute which interprets the theme, while the oboe - this time accompanied by a harpsichord - is used once again by the composer on Gabriel’oboe. The other tracks on the soundtrack are of an infinite richness, passing from tenderness (the flute/guitar dialogue on Brothers) to darkness (Remorse, Refusal, Alone), from melancholy (Carlotta) to action (Ascunsion). © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 18, 2004 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 5, 2011 | Cinevox

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1987 | A&M

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 6, 2007 | Gdm

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released February 23, 2014 | Gdm

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
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Classical - Released November 11, 2016 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 20, 2018 | Bacci Bros Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released March 27, 2016 | Bacci Bros Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1966 | EMI Music Publishing Italia Srl

The climax of a unique musical journey which began two years prior with A Fistful of Dollars, this soundtrack features as its main theme the flute riff (which personifies Clint Eastwood, aka “The Good”) which has gone down in the annals of history of film music. In order to direct him in the concept for this score, Sergio Leone explained to Ennio Morricone that the three title characters were in fact one (joined by their mutual thirst for gold). Thus, the composer decided to use the same musical motif for each of the three characters - limited to two notes - and using a different tone for each of them. A recorder for The Good, an ocarina for The Ugly (Lee Van Cleef), and human voices imitating the cry of a coyote for The Bad (Eli Wallach). Simple but terribly effective. A bridge was added to the heart of this memorable theme consisting of a dialogue between two trumpet players in a cavalry style. This soundtrack is also famous for the theme named The Ecstasy of Gold, which accompanies Tuco’s frantic search among the graves for the one which conceals the treasure. After the piano and English horn introduction, Morricone creates a crescendo making use of all sections and, above all, the voice of Edda Dell’Orso. It finishes with a musical grand finale which evokes Tuco’s ecstasy upon having found the grave in question. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 19, 2016 | Universal Music Publishing Ricordi srl

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 21, 2016 | Bacci Bros Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 15, 2016 | Editions Milan Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 12, 2016 | Universal Music Publishing Ricordi srl

Sergio Leone’s Once upon a time in the West benefits once again from Ennio Morricone's inspirational compositions. The conductor makes use of certain ingredients that were used in previous Leone westerns, namely his archetypal use of timbres. The deliberate use of the identifiable leitmotivs for each of the main characters (the common theme for Frank and Harmonic, united in their vengeance, that of Jill interpreted by the magical voice of Edda dell’Orso, and that of Cheyenne) struck viewers’ imaginations and worked to cement the melodies into collective memory. From only three notes (E, C, D#), Morricone developed one of the most famous themes in the history of cinema, The Man with the Harmonica, played initially on electric guitar by Bruno Battisti d’amaris, then sung by choirs and played by string orchestras. The other tour de force of the soundtrack is the romantic theme associated with Jill (Titoli). Not only does this music give great importance to a female character (something rare in a Western), but it also carries a nostalgic feeling of the old American West. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz  
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 6, 2020 | Decca (UMO) Classics (CAM)

Don’t expect coyote cries or clanging metal sounds in this album. Instead of celebrating hits by the Morricone/Sergio Leone duo, this exciting compilation holds little-known and sometimes unreleased compositions written for French and Italian films from the 60s and 70s. Surprisingly, the composer who died in July 2020 was just as inventive for this type of film - sometimes flirting with B movies - as he was for Leone’s legendary westerns. That said, we do find some of Morricone’s well-known touches including strange noises, psychedelic electric guitars, staccato strings and organs. All this can be found in Fuggire Lontano, one of the highlights of the album taken from the telefilm L’Automobile. On rare occasions you might even recognise the film, such as Henri Verneuil’s The Sicilian Clan… even if it is an energetic (and unpublished) variation on a secondary theme (Tema n°5). Slaloming between delirious experimental pieces (Eat it, San Babila Ore 22) and more “classic” compositions (such as L'immoralità and the little-known yet amazing Macchie solari), Morricone Secret offers a complete panorama of the composer’s unique style in the first part of his career, with what are undoubtedly some of his most inspired works. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 14, 2014 | EMI General Music srl

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1981 | Music Box - EMPF

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1964 | Decca (UMO) Classics (CAM)

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Two years after the Italian film Mondo Cane ushered in a slew of "shockumentaries" with loosely-knit scenes detailing global rituals -- from pig slaughtering in New Guinea to a Hula dance in Hawaii -- director Paul Cavara made his own contribution to the form with 1964's I Malamondo, another travelogue that turns the focus away from "native rituals" to take in European youth generally up to no good, but very much alive in their own mercurial zeitgeist. Called in to provide the necessary musical backing to such fun was Ennio Morricone, later made famous by his stellar soundtracks for Sergio Leone's popular and genre-defining spaghetti Westerns from the latter half of the '60s. And although this is something of a fledgling work for Morricone, many of his trademarks are in place: he adorns the hop-along beat of "Penso A Te" with the dusky surf guitar lines and Mexican brass trumpet interludes heard readily on his soundtracks for Leone's A Fistful of Dollars and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, while his patented military snare rolls, ominous tympani accents, and eerie piano and choral dressings are all given the deconstructed treatment on "S.O.S." and "Freshmen." Elsewhere, there's more of a pop and jazz feel to many of the pieces reminiscent of Henry Mancini's work of the period. Yet, even in these moments, Morricone still tweaks things nicely with the occasional clang of the chimes, some ethereal siren's voice, or a bit of percussion and flute madness. Capped off with Ken Coleman's swankly smooth vocal, "Funny World," Malamondo gives one a relatively tame but still fascinating hint of the complex and singular soundtrack material Morricone would begin to make shortly after this project. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 29, 2019 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Film Soundtracks - Released July 14, 2021 | Cinema Hotel Studios

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