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Rock - Released June 17, 1969 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released March 23, 1956 | RCA Victor

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released April 8, 1960 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Although they have common recording origins, two of the three singles, "It's Now or Never" and "Are You Lonesome Tonight," were very quirky by the standards of Elvis songs at the time -- the former inspired by Elvis's admiration for Tony Martin's 1949 hit "There's No Tomorrow," while the latter was recorded at the request of Col. Parker as a favor to his wife. They add to the diversity of sounds on this record, which shows a mature Elvis Presley. "Dirty, Dirty Feeling" and "It Feels So Right" showed he could still rock out and challenge authority and propriety, while "Reconsider Baby" and "Like a Baby" offer some of his best blues performances; but "The Thrill of Your Love" (a very gospel-tinged number), "Soldier Boy," "Girl of My Best Friend," and "Girl Next Door Went a' Walking," also displayed the rich, deep vocalizing that would challenge critics' expectations of Elvis Presley playing rhythm guitar throughout. He also comes off better than on any of his other albums since arriving at RCA, as a musician as much as a "star" (he'd always had a lot more to say about running his sessions than the critics who loathed his RCA years indicated). ~ Bruce Eder
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Rock - Released August 12, 1963 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The original Elvis' Golden Records, Vol. 3 was, like its predecessors, an unprecedented release -- no one in rock & roll up to that point, other than Elvis, had ever legitimately earned a second greatest-hits volume, much less a third. This is also the place where the legitimately softer, more mature Presley replaces the angry young Elvis represented on the first two volumes. On a sexual level, songs like "Stuck on You," "It's Now or Never," "Fame and Fortune," "I Gotta Know," and "Surrender" offer seduction rather than diverting violation. He might no longer have been a rebel, but as represented on the original ten songs of this album, he was still making the Top Five and even the top of the charts regularly with work that was legitimately fine early-'60s rock & roll and pop/rock. "His Latest Flame" or "Good Luck Charm" might not have been groundbreaking musical statements of the caliber of "Heartbreak Hotel" or "Blue Suede Shoes," but in Elvis' hands they were worth hearing over and over. The original 12 songs have been augmented by six more, including "Can't Help Falling in Love" (which should have been on this disc to begin with) and the hauntingly beautiful "Girl of My Best Friend," which was a number two hit in England (and may be the prettiest song Elvis ever cut), plus "Wild in the Country" and "Wooden Heart" (a hit in Europe) from G.I. Blues. The producers have stuck with the most tasteful and intriguing numbers from the films, within the time frame of the original release, the annotation is thorough, and the 1997 remastered sound runs circles around all prior editions. ~ Bruce Eder
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Rock - Released February 9, 1999 | RCA Records Label

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Elvis Presley's legendary recordings for Sun Records had been reissued many times before Sunrise appeared in early 1999, most notably in the 1987 collection The Complete Sun Recordings. Despite its title, The Complete Sun Recordings was missing a few odds and ends, plus its sequencing on CD was a little didactic, resulting in a repetitive listen. Those flaws are corrected on the exceptional Sunrise, a generous 38-song double-disc set that contains all of Elvis' Sun recordings, including alternate takes and several previously unreleased live performances. The compilers wisely decided to devote the first disc to the original takes, dedicating the second to alternate takes: six live cuts from 1955 and four private demos from 1953 and 1954. This sequencing emphasizes the brilliance of this music. Not only is listening to all 19 masters in a row quite breathtaking, but the second disc winds up as a revelatory experience, since it offers a kind of alternate history by following Elvis' pre-professional recordings from his Sun sessions to early live performances. As such, Sunrise is essential for the curious and the collector alike. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 14, 2014 | RCA - Legacy

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How much did Colonel Tom Parker flood the Elvis marketplace in the early '70s? Between 1969's From Vegas to Memphis to 1974's Elvis Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis, Presley was releasing a live album nearly every year (1971 was skipped). Each one was tied to an event -- a televised concert from Hawaii, his first concert in New York -- but, decades removed from this era, it's easy to forget that at the dawn of the '70s, seeing Elvis on-stage was in itself event, as he spent the better part of the '60s making movies instead of playing live. In fact, the last time he had played in Memphis, Tennessee was in 1961, so even though it was the last in a long line of live records, the homecoming concert captured on 1974's cumbersomely titled Elvis Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis was something special: it captured a beloved hero returning home. Presley made sure he was prepared for the occasion, running through much of the set two days prior the March 18 Memphis concert at the Richmond Coliseum. The 2014 Legacy Edition of Recorded Live on Stage contains that concert as its second disc (this second disc also has five very relaxed, very spare, quite appealing rehearsals from August 1974, cut just prior to an appearance in Vegas) and it's quite a bit different in tenor than the released record; it's loose and rollicking, with Elvis and the TCB band feeding off the energy of an exuberant audience. In contrast, the Memphis concert -- here on the first disc, in the expanded, full-concert addition originally released on Follow That Dream Records in 2004 -- is precise, professional, and deadly, a testament to the Presley team being a well-oiled machine. As this full-length Legacy Expansion reveals, far from being just another Elvis live record, Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis is a little bit of dynamite, proof that on a good night in 1974, Elvis was still as good as rock & roll got. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released November 22, 1968 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released August 10, 2018 | RCA Victor - Legacy

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“Since I was two years old, all I knew was gospel music. It became such a part of my life, it was as natural as dancing. A way to escape my problems, and my way of release.” Elvis fans are well aware of their idol’s veneration for gospel. Fans who are always willing to expand their already XXXL music library. Even when the attempt ostensibly looks like a cash grab… This Where No One Stands Alone celebrates the King’s gospel side. Produced by Joel Weinshanker, Lisa Marie Presley and Andy Childs, the album released in August 2018 features re-orchestrated versions performed with artists who worked with Elvis on stage or in studio, like Darlene Love (who sang with him for the first time during the NBC TV special in 1968) and Dr Cissy Houston (who, along with the Sweet Inspirations, performed with the King on stage from 1969). Where No One Stands Alone also includes a duo with his daughter Lisa Marie Presley on the eponymous song. “It was a very powerful and moving experience to sing with my father, she writes in the album’s sleeve notes. The lyrics speak to me and touch my soul. I'm certain that the lyrics spoke to my father in much the same way.” Also featured are some classics so dear to the King, like Crying In The Chapel, How Great Thou Art, You’ll Never Walk Alone and Saved composed by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller, as well as So High, Stand By Me, In The Garden and the indispensable Amazing Grace. Titles for the most part borrowed from two gospel albums, How Great Thou Art released in 1967 and He Touched Me in 1972. Concretely, only the King’s voice was retained. The parts with the Jordanaires, guitarists Scotty Moore, Chip Young and James Burton, Floyd Cramer’s piano and D. J. Fontana’s drums were all scrapped. For those who know the original recordings, it’s a painful amputation. Even upsetting… Yet the work offered here is honest and doesn’t distort the King’s initial intention nor the spirit of his interpretations. Quite logically, this 2018 production brings a “contemporary” touch without vainly and hypocritically trying to remain young and modern. The master’s voice remains intact and staggering as ever. The union between the King and the Lord could only be divine… © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 18, 2000 | RCA Records Label

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For those familiar only with the King of Rock & Roll's name and reputation, the prospect of buying a best-of can be quite a nauseating proposition. The huge range of compilations available varies in quality, and depth, but as yet there exists no definitive choice for first-time Presleyers. RCA's latest attempt to correct this is perhaps the finest best-of Elvis Presley ever. Spanning two CDs and, as its title suggests, 50 songs, all the classic tracks are here, from "Heartbreak Hotel" through "Suspicious Minds." The sound quality is as near-perfect as one will get for a best-of from this artist, and the packaging is quite superb. While it may not be as in-depth as other compilations, The 50 Greatest Hits is adequate for those wanting the major hits, and provides a taster for each of his styles. As a starting point to Elvis Presley's work, this is unmatched by any other best-of and is an almost perfect compilation in that all of his most noted tracks are here, as are all the finest moment from each of his eras. For the more hardcore Elvis fan, also, The 50 Greatest Hits is an essential purchase, offering almost all of the finest tracks on a mere two discs. ~ Ben Davies
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Rock - Released August 5, 2010 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released April 6, 2018 | RCA - Legacy

The intent of Thom Zimny's documentary The Searcher is to showcase the artistry of Elvis Presley, an aspect that can sometimes get overwhelmed by Presley's enduring popularity. Appropriately, its accompanying soundtrack -- available either as a single CD/LP or in a triple-disc deluxe edition -- follows the same aesthetic, showcasing Elvis as an artist, not a hitmaker. Of course, there are plenty of hits here, especially on the three-CD edition, which contains two discs of Presley recordings and a disc split between Elvis inspirations, selections from the evocative score from Mike McCready, and a version of "Wooden Heart" by Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. The key is context: "Hound Dog" leads into "(There'll Be) Peace in the Valley (For Me)," "Suspicious Minds" is heard in an alternate take where Elvis is still sorting through the song, "Heartbreak Hotel" is paired with the hard blues of "Lawdy Miss Clawdy." The first disc relies on early material, the second latter-day material, and the editorial touch is a bit more evident on the latter: Since the '50s sides are so frequently reissued, there isn't much room for surprises, but the late-'60s and '70s material -- not unfamiliar, but not as common as the '50s -- makes the case for Presley's artistry quite nicely. Ultimately, this isn't for Elvis fanatics -- there's not much in the way of rarities -- but as an introduction to Presley's work, this is quite good, and it's an excellent way to dig deeper than the hits. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | RCA - Legacy

The King of Rock & Roll's 1968 Christmas television special and corresponding LP needed no other title than ELVIS (emblazoned in letters as tall as the record itself), but it became enshrined as "The '68 Comeback Special." During the late '60s, several years removed from live performance of any kind, Elvis had become something previously unimaginable: safe. His recorded output and material were strictly controlled to maximize profits, his appearances were limited to movie theaters, and only his friends saw the uninhibited rebel that had shocked America during the mid-'50s. But when Presley and Colonel Tom Parker agreed to record a Christmas television special to be directed and co-produced by Steve Binder, it became the catalyst for a comeback. Binder's previous involvement in television (the widely respected T.A.M.I. Show and Hullabaloo) had proved that he understood the best way to present rock music in a television context. On the eve of recording, Binder and his tested crew were on track to produce an excellent show (with dramatic and thematic set pieces tied to Elvis' performances), but it was Binder's chance witnessing of an informal after-hours jam in Elvis' dressing room that transformed a sturdy television vehicle into one of the signal moments in Elvis' career. Binder proposed that Elvis perform part of his special in an informal sit-down jam session, spending time reflecting on the Elvis sensation of the late '50s while he performed some of his old favorites with a group of friends. Although initial reception to the idea was lukewarm (from the Colonel especially), Elvis finally agreed and, with only a few days before taping, invited two of his earliest bandmates, Scotty Moore and D.J. Fontana, to join him. Although he exhibited more nerves than he ever had in the past -- a combination of the importance this chance obviously presented plus the large gap between the psychedelic music culture of 1968 and the rather quaint rock & roll of ten years earlier -- Elvis delivered an incredible performance throughout the television special. His vocal performances were loose and gutsy, and his repartee was both self-deprecating and sarcastic about his early days as well as his moribund film career ("There's something wrong with my lip!...I got news for you baby, I did 29 pictures like that"). He was uninhibited and utterly unsafe, showing the first inkling in ten years that life and spirit were still left in music's biggest artistic property. The resulting LP, NBC-TV Special, combined sit-down and stand-up segments, but probably over-compensated on the stand-up segments. Several previous RCA compilations (Memories: The '68 Comeback Special and Tiger Man) issued more of the sit-down shows, but for the 40th anniversary of its recording, RCA released The Complete '68 Comeback Special, a lavish four-disc box set. It collects the original LP plus bonus tracks on the first disc, then presents Elvis' complete performances of the two sit-down shows and two stand-up shows on two successive discs. A fourth disc includes earlier rehearsals for the special that find Elvis incredibly loose and joking with friends as well as the audience. Although four discs centering on a single show verge on overkill for any but the most enthusiastic fans, what impresses about The Complete '68 Comeback Special is how much it prefigures the rest of Elvis' career. Dramatic, intense, driven, and earthy, frequently moving but not without the occasional cloying note, Elvis during the '70s was the apotheosis of rock music, a righteous blend of rock and soul, gospel and pop, blues and country. ~ John Bush
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Ambient/New Age - Released November 24, 2017 | RCA - Legacy

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The third recording featuring the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with Elvis Presley, Christmas with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is no different, no better or worse, than the two hit records it follows. Like those albums, it's a puffy, pompous march through familiar tunes, all turned purple due to heavy-handed arrangements that favor onslaught, not subtlety. Presley sounds good but that's mere circumstance: he was recorded with musicians he trusted, never expecting he'd be cut off from his crew, mutated into a middlebrow mediocrity. Christmas with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra can be pleasant enough because it's always a pleasure to hear Presley sing and the supporting Philharmonic plays with skill but, like its companions, it's music for people who love the idea of Elvis Presley and not his music. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released July 1, 2015 | Crazy Warthog Media

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Rock - Released October 30, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | RCA - Legacy

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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

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The Wonder of You is a sequel in the truest sense: it delivers more of the same thing that made the 2015 album If I Can Dream into a surprise hit around the globe. The gimmick behind both of the albums is taking original Elvis Presley vocal performances and setting them to brand-new orchestral arrangements from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The Wonder of You isn't as splashy as its predecessor, lacking duets with Michael Bublé and Il Volo (the bonus track, "Just Pretend," does feature Helene Fischer), and it also doesn't contain quite as many rockers as If I Can Dream. All this means The Wonder of You is thoroughly middlebrow, largely consisting of ballads and soft pop tunes, all given pompous pops arrangements. Occasionally, the new versions aren't too far away from the originals -- usually, this would be for such '70s Vegas showstoppers as "I Just Can't Help Believin'" -- but there's still a dramatic disconnect between Presley's vocal performances and the cheerfully cheesy orchestrations, particularly on numbers like "Kentucky Rain" and "Suspicious Minds," recordings that benefited from the interaction of Elvis and the musicians in Chips Moman's American Sound Studio. To the creators of The Wonder of You, this kind of musical interplay is a mere nicety: all that matters is the power of Presley's performance, which the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra accentuates. It, like If I Can Dream, is executed well -- the separation between the old tapes and new performance is seamless -- but the concept is misbegotten and the results are tacky, a record that celebrates Presley the persona instead of Elvis the musician. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released October 10, 1995 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released October 15, 1957 | RCA Victor

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Elvis' 1957 original Christmas album is one of his most inspired early outings and the first time he tackled anything resembling a thematic concept. Split evenly between rockers and bluesy numbers like "Santa Claus Is Back in Town," "Blue Christmas," and "Santa Bring My Baby Back to Me," perennials like "White Christmas," "I'll Be Home for Christmas," and "Silent Night," and straight-ahead gospel favorites like "I Believe," "Peace in the Valley" and "Take My Hand, Precious Lord," the disc revealed a different side of the rocker for the first time on a public instead conditioned to expect something outrageous. One of the King's shining moments, this is quite simply still one of the best holiday albums available. ~ Cub Koda
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Rock - Released June 23, 1992 | RCA Records Label

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Elvis Presley in the magazine
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