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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1956 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions Jazzwise Five-star review
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1956 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Verve

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
With a wide vocal range and a light, fluid way of phrasing, not to mention a real flair for scat singing, one that made her the equivalent of a jazz horn player moving in and around and between the notes of a melody, Ella Fitzgerald was truly one of a kind, dubbed the First Lady of Song, the very voice of jazz in her lifetime and, quite likely, for all time. She started out as a swing singer, had no problem with bebop, bossa nova, or calypso, or anything else for that matter, and wasn't hesitant to bring her skills to more modern material in the 1960s and 1970s. Along the way she helped establish the long-playing album as its own art form as she worked her way through the Great American Songbook, composer by composer, in a landmark series of albums in the 1950s, and her versions of those classic songs often ended up the definitive ones. She spent her last years as she spent her career, as a revered and iconic American treasure. Amazingly, this lovingly assembled ten-disc box set is the first time a career-long survey of her work has been put together in a retrospective that includes her first sides with Chick Webb all the way through her Decca and Verve years, with a couple of previously unreleased live concerts added in for good measure. It all sorts out to a wonderful release, with a beautifully bound hardcover book included that tells Fitzgerald's story and adds detailed track notes, culminating in a lovely and telling testament to one of America's greatest singers. ~ Steve Leggett
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1964 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Though she recorded often during the early '60s, Ella Fitzgerald had mostly been seen in jazz settings, whether small group (Bill Doggett) or big band (Count Basie). Hello, Dolly!, recorded early in 1964, offered her a chance to record with an orchestra in the background and a list of popular crossover songs on the sheets. The first three were all big hits during early 1964, the opening title track a surprise chart-topper for her dear friend Louis Armstrong, the second, "People," a Broadway crossover hit for Barbra Streisand, and the third being the only title published by BMI on the entire LP, "Can't Buy Me Love" by the Beatles (coincidentally, the song that Armstrong knocked from the top). Just the beginning of Fitzgerald's flirtation with the new rock generation of the '60s, her Beatles cover is undeniably wonderful, an irresistible hard swinger with much room for improvisation, and none of the hesitation most jazz singers would display in the future when attempting to confront the coup de tete of cool performed by the British Invasion. Elsewhere the record is invigorated by Fitzgerald's feel for material and a series of underrated charts by Frank DeVol, such as the spare strings on Ella's mournful "My Man," the quiet Latin intrigue of "The Thrill Is Gone," and the lush strings of "Lullaby of the Leaves." ~ John Bush
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | GRP

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
During the late '50s, Ella Fitzgerald continued her Song Book records with Sings the George and Ira Gershwin Song Book, releasing a series of albums featuring 59 songs written by George and Ira Gershwin. Those songs, plus alternate takes, were combined on a four-disc box set, Sings the George and Ira Gershwin Song Book, in 1998. These performances are easily among Fitzgerald's very best, and for any serious fan, this is the ideal place to acquire the recordings, since the sound and presentation are equally classy and impressive. ~ Leo Stanley
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
For years, "The Girl fom Ipanema" was a staple in Ella Fitzgerald's songbook, so it's something of a wonder that it was not until 1981 that Ella Abraça Jobim, Fitzgerald's double-album immersion in Antonio Carlos Jobim's back catalog, appeared. Ella's first single-composer release since 1964's tribute to Jerome Kern, Ella Abraça Jobim is, more than anything, final proof of the unassuming Brazilian's place in jazz history alongside the great composers. Sadly Jobim's mellow bossa nova, drenched in the Brazilian concept of saudade, or agreeable melancholy, doesn't necessarily gel with Fitzgerald's swing-based and energetic vocal style. Fitzgerald and her small group take songs like "Agua de Beber (Water to Drink)" at just slightly too speedy a tempo, rushing a bit where they should be gamboling. Fitzgerald is in very good voice compared to some other recordings from her later years, though, sadly, she's clearly not at her peak. Norman Granz's production is typically excellent, however, and the arrangements are refreshingly free of the typical late-'70s/early-'80s post-fusion clichés. Neither Fitzgerald nor Jobim's finest, then, but not without merit. ~ Stewart Mason
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Ella Fitzgerald didn't lack for live recording opportunities in the late '50s, which on the surface, would make this first issue of a 1958 Chicago live club date an easy one to pass on. Verve label head Norman Granz recorded her often in the '50s with an eye to releasing live albums, which he did with her shows at Newport in 1957 and Los Angeles' Opera House in 1958 (not to mention another 1958 concert in Rome that was released 30 years later to wide acclaim). Those shows, however, differed widely from this one, which found her in front of a very small audience at Chicago's jazz Mecca Mister Kelly's (Sarah Vaughan's landmark At Mister Kelly's was recorded there four months earlier). Fitzgerald's artistry is basically a given in this situation, but much of the material recorded here was rare and obscure; "Your Red Wagon" had only been released as a single, her delightfully melodic "Across the Alley from the Alamo" never appeared elsewhere, and for a pair of Sinatra evergreens -- "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" and "Witchcraft" -- the former had never appeared, and the latter only appeared later, on a 1961 return to the site of her Berlin live landmark. ~ John Bush
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard