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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 3, 2021 | OVO

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Since 2016 and his fourth album Views, Drake has changed dimension and his artistic direction. Seeking the musical hit, often with brilliance, allowing all his influences to bloom on his mixtape More Life in 2017 or dividing the critics with Dark Lane Demo Tapes in 2020, here he is returning to his first loves. Certified Lover Boy is frontal and gargantuan in terms of lyrics as Drake has something to say. Starting with settling scores with Kanye West or with the industry. But after the storm comes the calm, as with the tracks Pipe Down or 7am On A Bridle Path, these are the moments when the Canadian can leave aside the discursive to at last please himself, and to explore what he does best. On the first tracks such as Champagne Theory or Papi’s Home, Drake has superbly placed Certified Lover Boy under the sampling prism. But that is only a foretaste. For when he summons Metro Boomin to perform in Knife Talk or the trap bosses Future and Young Thug on Way 2 Sexy, he cuts to the essential, looks ahead and makes this album one of his best releases since 2015. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 3, 2021 | OVO

Since 2016 and his fourth album Views, Drake has changed dimension and his artistic direction. Seeking the musical hit, often with brilliance, allowing all his influences to bloom on his mixtape More Life in 2017 or dividing the critics with Dark Lane Demo Tapes in 2020, here he is returning to his first loves. Certified Lover Boy is frontal and gargantuan in terms of lyrics as Drake has something to say. Starting with settling scores with Kanye West or with the industry. But after the storm comes the calm, as with the tracks Pipe Down or 7am On A Bridle Path, these are the moments when the Canadian can leave aside the discursive to at last please himself, and to explore what he does best. On the first tracks such as Champagne Theory or Papi’s Home, Drake has superbly placed Certified Lover Boy under the sampling prism. But that is only a foretaste. For when he summons Metro Boomin to perform in Knife Talk or the trap bosses Future and Young Thug on Way 2 Sexy, he cuts to the essential, looks ahead and makes this album one of his best releases since 2015. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 2, 2021 | OVO

After a long run-up that included videos with impressive cameos, fancy hairstyles, and knee surgery, when Drake's Certified Lover Boy was released, it came in at an epic length of 21 songs and was packed with a glittering array of guest stars from across the rap spectrum, including Lil Durk, Lil Baby, Rick Ross, Lil Wayne, Kid Cudi, Future, Young Thug, Travis Scott, and Jay-Z. As with most of his releases since he discovered trap, a majority of the songs plod along slowly while Drake weaves tales of his own greatness; his prowess as a lover, father, and athlete; and how people are doing him dirty, all in a voice that wavers between laid-back vibes and played-out boredom. Only a few stand out from the grind. The album opener, "Champagne Poetry," contrasts a sped-up Beatles sample ("Michelle") with an off-kilter bassline, then segues into a joyous gospel sample as Drake revs up his flow and actually sounds invested in the song. The first half of "N 2 Deep" forgoes trap clichés for some metallic guitar riffing and twinkling synths before it succumbs to the inevitable slow-motion beats; "Pipe Down" is a strong R&B groove with swirling vocal samples, rumbling drum fills, and orchestra hits; and "Race My Mind" is a trippy late-night electro-soul ballad and a reminder that Drake is a better singer than he is a rapper. The sunny "Fountains" adds some African funk to the mix and ends up being one of the album's highlights, thanks to some help from vocalist Tems. The record's most exciting song is the throwback jam "You Only Live Twice," which blasts away like a Bad Boy classic and features hugely entertaining verses from Rick Ross and Lil Wayne that overshadow Drake's predictable rhymes. This dynamic repeats throughout the record as guests pop by and raise the stakes. Jay-Z swoops in for a swaggering verse on "Love All," 21 Savage adds some grit to the otherwise cartoonish "Knife Talk," Young Thug's yearning vocals add some soul to "Get Along Better," and Travis Scott gives a lesson on how to sound intense without raising your voice on "Fair Trade." It's no shame for Drake to be outclassed by some of the best rappers around, but it is a shame that one starts to dread the songs without features because then all that's left is Drake and his far-too-familiar lyrical concerns and mostly tedious style. Boil the record down to a handful of Drake solo cuts -- making sure to include the one or two that break the trap mold -- and the best of the features, and Certified Lover Boy would get a passing grade. As it stands, the album is an overlong, undercooked, and clichéd listen that will no doubt appeal to the Drake fans who can't get enough of him, but will leave anyone looking for something new sadly out of luck. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 2, 2021 | OVO

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After a long run-up that included videos with impressive cameos, fancy hairstyles, and knee surgery, when Drake's Certified Lover Boy was released, it came in at an epic length of 21 songs and was packed with a glittering array of guest stars from across the rap spectrum, including Lil Durk, Lil Baby, Rick Ross, Lil Wayne, Kid Cudi, Future, Young Thug, Travis Scott, and Jay-Z. As with most of his releases since he discovered trap, a majority of the songs plod along slowly while Drake weaves tales of his own greatness; his prowess as a lover, father, and athlete; and how people are doing him dirty, all in a voice that wavers between laid-back vibes and played-out boredom. Only a few stand out from the grind. The album opener, "Champagne Poetry," contrasts a sped-up Beatles sample ("Michelle") with an off-kilter bassline, then segues into a joyous gospel sample as Drake revs up his flow and actually sounds invested in the song. The first half of "N 2 Deep" forgoes trap clichés for some metallic guitar riffing and twinkling synths before it succumbs to the inevitable slow-motion beats; "Pipe Down" is a strong R&B groove with swirling vocal samples, rumbling drum fills, and orchestra hits; and "Race My Mind" is a trippy late-night electro-soul ballad and a reminder that Drake is a better singer than he is a rapper. The sunny "Fountains" adds some African funk to the mix and ends up being one of the album's highlights, thanks to some help from vocalist Tems. The record's most exciting song is the throwback jam "You Only Live Twice," which blasts away like a Bad Boy classic and features hugely entertaining verses from Rick Ross and Lil Wayne that overshadow Drake's predictable rhymes. This dynamic repeats throughout the record as guests pop by and raise the stakes. Jay-Z swoops in for a swaggering verse on "Love All," 21 Savage adds some grit to the otherwise cartoonish "Knife Talk," Young Thug's yearning vocals add some soul to "Get Along Better," and Travis Scott gives a lesson on how to sound intense without raising your voice on "Fair Trade." It's no shame for Drake to be outclassed by some of the best rappers around, but it is a shame that one starts to dread the songs without features because then all that's left is Drake and his far-too-familiar lyrical concerns and mostly tedious style. Boil the record down to a handful of Drake solo cuts -- making sure to include the one or two that break the trap mold -- and the best of the features, and Certified Lover Boy would get a passing grade. As it stands, the album is an overlong, undercooked, and clichéd listen that will no doubt appeal to the Drake fans who can't get enough of him, but will leave anyone looking for something new sadly out of luck. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 5, 2021 | OVO

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3 stars out of 5 -- "Overall, on SCARY HOURS 2, Drake sounds less like an artist with something to prove and more like a title defender who might finally be willing to challenge himself again." © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 5, 2021 | OVO

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3 stars out of 5 -- "Overall, on SCARY HOURS 2, Drake sounds less like an artist with something to prove and more like a title defender who might finally be willing to challenge himself again." © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 5, 2021 | OVO

3 stars out of 5 -- "Overall, on SCARY HOURS 2, Drake sounds less like an artist with something to prove and more like a title defender who might finally be willing to challenge himself again." © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 5, 2021 | OVO

3 stars out of 5 -- "Overall, on SCARY HOURS 2, Drake sounds less like an artist with something to prove and more like a title defender who might finally be willing to challenge himself again." © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 15, 2020 | OVO Sound - Warner Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 14, 2020 | OVO Sound - Warner Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 14, 2020 | OVO

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 14, 2020 | OVO

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 14, 2020 | OVO

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 14, 2020 | OVO

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 2020 | OVO

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Since the 2010s undeniably belonged to Drake, the dominant figure in pop music, sales and impact, the way in which he would kick off the the 20s was highly anticipated. With Dark Lane Demo Tapes, his most recent mixtape since More Life released three years before (and between the two, the album Scorpion), the Toronto native’s game-plan is clear: directly address the listener with a certain romanticism, invite along some heavyweights (Future, Playboi Carti and even Chris Brown), and take the opportunity to settle some scores. There’re few surprises on this new project, and after all, why must there be? Drake is in autopilot and what we are have here is an offering to fans. Despite strong tracks like Time Flies, or the drill production on Demons (featuring big name on the contemporary drill scene, Fivio Foreign), Dark Lane Demo Tapes is not going to change anyone’s opinion of Drake. Nevertheless, Drake’s choice is clear: instead of elaborating individual tracks he has chosen to string together instrumentals while rambling over the top of them. It’s a mixtape after all, not an album. In this format, it’s often easier to make use of production that is more plainly rap. It’s therefore not too contentious to say that the stand-out tracks on the record, from War to Desires (featuring Future) and D4L (with Young Thug and Future once again), are those that are less sung. Awaiting the next album then. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 2020 | OVO

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Since the 2010s undeniably belonged to Drake, the dominant figure in pop music, sales and impact, the way in which he would kick off the the 20s was highly anticipated. With Dark Lane Demo Tapes, his most recent mixtape since More Life released three years before (and between the two, the album Scorpion), the Toronto native’s game-plan is clear: directly address the listener with a certain romanticism, invite along some heavyweights (Future, Playboi Carti and even Chris Brown), and take the opportunity to settle some scores. There’re few surprises on this new project, and after all, why must there be? Drake is in autopilot and what we are have here is an offering to fans. Despite strong tracks like Time Flies, or the drill production on Demons (featuring big name on the contemporary drill scene, Fivio Foreign), Dark Lane Demo Tapes is not going to change anyone’s opinion of Drake. Nevertheless, Drake’s choice is clear: instead of elaborating individual tracks he has chosen to string together instrumentals while rambling over the top of them. It’s a mixtape after all, not an album. In this format, it’s often easier to make use of production that is more plainly rap. It’s therefore not too contentious to say that the stand-out tracks on the record, from War to Desires (featuring Future) and D4L (with Young Thug and Future once again), are those that are less sung. Awaiting the next album then. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 2020 | OVO

Since the 2010s undeniably belonged to Drake, the dominant figure in pop music, sales and impact, the way in which he would kick off the the 20s was highly anticipated. With Dark Lane Demo Tapes, his most recent mixtape since More Life released three years before (and between the two, the album Scorpion), the Toronto native’s game-plan is clear: directly address the listener with a certain romanticism, invite along some heavyweights (Future, Playboi Carti and even Chris Brown), and take the opportunity to settle some scores. There’re few surprises on this new project, and after all, why must there be? Drake is in autopilot and what we are have here is an offering to fans. Despite strong tracks like Time Flies, or the drill production on Demons (featuring big name on the contemporary drill scene, Fivio Foreign), Dark Lane Demo Tapes is not going to change anyone’s opinion of Drake. Nevertheless, Drake’s choice is clear: instead of elaborating individual tracks he has chosen to string together instrumentals while rambling over the top of them. It’s a mixtape after all, not an album. In this format, it’s often easier to make use of production that is more plainly rap. It’s therefore not too contentious to say that the stand-out tracks on the record, from War to Desires (featuring Future) and D4L (with Young Thug and Future once again), are those that are less sung. Awaiting the next album then. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 2020 | OVO

Since the 2010s undeniably belonged to Drake, the dominant figure in pop music, sales and impact, the way in which he would kick off the the 20s was highly anticipated. With Dark Lane Demo Tapes, his most recent mixtape since More Life released three years before (and between the two, the album Scorpion), the Toronto native’s game-plan is clear: directly address the listener with a certain romanticism, invite along some heavyweights (Future, Playboi Carti and even Chris Brown), and take the opportunity to settle some scores. There’re few surprises on this new project, and after all, why must there be? Drake is in autopilot and what we are have here is an offering to fans. Despite strong tracks like Time Flies, or the drill production on Demons (featuring big name on the contemporary drill scene, Fivio Foreign), Dark Lane Demo Tapes is not going to change anyone’s opinion of Drake. Nevertheless, Drake’s choice is clear: instead of elaborating individual tracks he has chosen to string together instrumentals while rambling over the top of them. It’s a mixtape after all, not an album. In this format, it’s often easier to make use of production that is more plainly rap. It’s therefore not too contentious to say that the stand-out tracks on the record, from War to Desires (featuring Future) and D4L (with Young Thug and Future once again), are those that are less sung. Awaiting the next album then. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 3, 2020 | OVO

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 3, 2020 | OVO

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Drake in the magazine