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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 23, 2017 | Epic - We The Best

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 16, 2019 | Epic - We The Best

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 5, 2016 | Epic - We The Best

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2011 | Cash Money

We the Best Forever may be DJ Khaled’s first release for the Cash Money label, but little else has changed. The good news is that the ringleader’s formula of rounding up superstar talent for an album jammed with potential singles still works, unless you think everything on 2011 radio is trash and that big money ruined hip-hop. This is unrelenting gloss where all the participants “win” and declare themselves “the best,” and from the tres cool opener “I’m on One” (where Drake drops the brilliant Degrassi ref “I ain’t worked this hard since I was 18”) to the closing remix of “Welcome to My Hood” (an air horn-fueled Miami anthem with Khaled taking a rare producer’s credit), it’s hard to argue. “I’m Thuggin’” “goes dumb” in the rowdiest way possible with Waka Flocka and Ace Hood concocting a new genre you might call “Neanderthal crunk,” while “It Ain’t Over Til It’s Over” is soul-warming old-school butter featuring an ancient Schoolly D beat and Mary J. Blige in fine form. With the Game, Busta Rhymes, and Cee Lo all on the cut, “Sleep When I’m Gone” is the highlight it should be, while the fourth-quarter winner “A Million Lights” is prime pop-rap with production from Khaled’s Florida brothers, the Runners. Newcomers should be aware that Khaled interrupts all this grand entertainment with his usual grand posturing -- shouting “We the best!” and whatnot -- so be prepared for an experience somewhere between a star-studded soundtrack and a DJ-helmed mixtape. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 23, 2015 | We The Best Music Group

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2013 | Cash Money

Those who would accuse DJ Khaled of using an overly audacious album title for this seventh studio effort are quickly schooled once "Obama [Winning More Interlude]" hits the speakers. On the opening cut, real world audio of a national news broadcast finds America's 44th President entering an auditorium to the traditional "Hail to the Chief," but the music quickly switches to Khaled's platinum single "All I Do Is Win." In true Presidential style, Obama steps on the song's hook, asking the audience "How do you like my new entrance music?" and they go wild, because Khaled won the popular vote for the United States' hypeman-in-chief, plus he's the czar of mainstream hip-hop compilations that just happen to be filled with new tracks. Suffering from Success is more of the glorious same, as Khaled continues to win, win, win no matter what, filling hooky highlights like "No New Friends" with high power guest stars, which in this track's case, means the billion dollar trio of Drake, Lil Wayne, and Rick Ross. Canadian hitmaker Boi-1da helms the cut while big-time producers like J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League (creating well-funded mayhem with Future, Ace Hood, and Plies on "Blackball") and Timbaland (who also raps on the hard-hitting, mega-posse cut "You Don't Want These Problems") make sure the beats are what's poppin' in 2013, while folks like Meek Mill (clever and cool on "I Feel Like Pac/I Feel Like Biggie") and Mavado (offering dancehall vibes and sweet nothings to Nicki Minaj on the great "Give It All to Me") help round out a lightweight album that's otherwise big pimping and bottle service. Khaled does his usual cheerleading and gets some production credits himself, but the real trick he pulls off is inspiring all these artists to somehow save up all these high-grade club tracks and singles for the DJ's annual dispatch. Suffering from Success, once again. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2012 | Cash Money

He's a DJ, not a rapper or producer, and yet Kiss the Ring is another in a long line of exciting compilations from DJ Khaled, the man with the million-dollar contact list. Being that it is his second release for the Cash Money label, the best of the YMCMB staff is here save Drake, with Lil Wayne leading T.I. and the Auto-Tuned Future through "Bitches & Bottles (Let's Get It Started)," a party tune with Mike Will Made-It on the production and six names in the songwriting credits, but it still comes off as simple and immediate. Nicki Minaj joins labelmate Wayne, along with Chris Brown and Rick Ross, for "Take It to the Head," a song perfect for rainy days as the lyricists go from sullen to champion over a slow-rolling Runners production. T-Pain's usual high-gloss schtick seems renewed with Big Sean, Wiz Khalifa, and Ace Hood all representing the new breed of witty thugs on "I'm So Blessed," and seeing how the Floridian Khaled is always watching the island talent, 2012's Jamaican dancehall champion Mavado is here, sounding majestic and very Buju Banton on the sad tale of Kingston ghetto life called "Suicidal Thoughts." Khaled introduces the moving cut with the iffy "pass the Guinness," plus all the "kiss the ring" drops are perilously close to Spinal Tap or Too Short territory, but past that, his song-interrupting shouts of "we the best" are kept to an acceptable level, and with veterans like Scarface and Nas here on the sour "Hip Hop," the glitter is anchored by street cred and some veteran wisdom. Still, this is the sixth time the DJ's used this formula, so any "lack of evolution" argument makes for a valid, but tiny, complaint, so think of this as a run-of-the-mill Khaled album and that mill is still doing pretty awesome. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 16, 2008 | eOne Music

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2011 | Cash Money

We the Best Forever may be DJ Khaled’s first release for the Cash Money label, but little else has changed. The good news is that the ringleader’s formula of rounding up superstar talent for an album jammed with potential singles still works, unless you think everything on 2011 radio is trash and that big money ruined hip-hop. This is unrelenting gloss where all the participants “win” and declare themselves “the best,” and from the tres cool opener “I’m on One” (where Drake drops the brilliant Degrassi ref “I ain’t worked this hard since I was 18”) to the closing remix of “Welcome to My Hood” (an air horn-fueled Miami anthem with Khaled taking a rare producer’s credit), it’s hard to argue. “I’m Thuggin’” “goes dumb” in the rowdiest way possible with Waka Flocka and Ace Hood concocting a new genre you might call “Neanderthal crunk,” while “It Ain’t Over Til It’s Over” is soul-warming old-school butter featuring an ancient Schoolly D beat and Mary J. Blige in fine form. With the Game, Busta Rhymes, and Cee Lo all on the cut, “Sleep When I’m Gone” is the highlight it should be, while the fourth-quarter winner “A Million Lights” is prime pop-rap with production from Khaled’s Florida brothers, the Runners. Newcomers should be aware that Khaled interrupts all this grand entertainment with his usual grand posturing -- shouting “We the best!” and whatnot -- so be prepared for an experience somewhere between a star-studded soundtrack and a DJ-helmed mixtape. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 2, 2010 | eOne Music

The release of DJ Khaled’s fourth studio album was repeatedly delayed. With each pushed-back street date came a new track list, the biggest change coming when the Shyne feature “All My Life” fell off, and Young Jeezy went from centerpiece artist to two-track contributor. It’s a testament then to the DJ’s executive production power that the final product not only holds together, but solidly supports the album’s theme, offering a fist-pumping song cycle of triumph in the hood. With the five-star lineup of T-Pain, Ludacris, Snoop Dogg, and Rick Ross, “All I Do Is Win” is the gold medal track, with the Young Jeezy showcase “Put Your Hands Up” winning the silver. Bun B (“I got those yams like Thanksgiving dinner”) helps “Rockin’ All My Chains On” score the bronze, giving the track a slight edge over the hood reggae number “Killing Me,” which partners Busta Rhymes with Jamaican stars Buju Banton and Bounty Killer. Through intros and shout-outs, Khaled puts more of himself into this personal, story-telling album, and while this supposedly troubled effort seems complete and sound, for the most part, the closing “Rep My City” is the least satisfying number and is best thought of as a bonus track. Otherwise, the Terror Squad DJ’s ode to the victor is as satisfying as his other mega-star-studded albums, with the added benefit of being more cohesive and significantly more purposeful. © David Jeffries /TiVo
From
CD£14.99

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2012 | Cash Money

He's a DJ, not a rapper or producer, and yet Kiss the Ring is another in a long line of exciting compilations from DJ Khaled, the man with the million-dollar contact list. Being that it is his second release for the Cash Money label, the best of the YMCMB staff is here save Drake, with Lil Wayne leading T.I. and the Auto-Tuned Future through "Bitches & Bottles (Let's Get It Started)," a party tune with Mike Will Made-It on the production and six names in the songwriting credits, but it still comes off as simple and immediate. Nicki Minaj joins labelmate Wayne, along with Chris Brown and Rick Ross, for "Take It to the Head," a song perfect for rainy days as the lyricists go from sullen to champion over a slow-rolling Runners production. T-Pain's usual high-gloss schtick seems renewed with Big Sean, Wiz Khalifa, and Ace Hood all representing the new breed of witty thugs on "I'm So Blessed," and seeing how the Floridian Khaled is always watching the island talent, 2012's Jamaican dancehall champion Mavado is here, sounding majestic and very Buju Banton on the sad tale of Kingston ghetto life called "Suicidal Thoughts." Khaled introduces the moving cut with the iffy "pass the Guinness," plus all the "kiss the ring" drops are perilously close to Spinal Tap or Too Short territory, but past that, his song-interrupting shouts of "we the best" are kept to an acceptable level, and with veterans like Scarface and Nas here on the sour "Hip Hop," the glitter is anchored by street cred and some veteran wisdom. Still, this is the sixth time the DJ's used this formula, so any "lack of evolution" argument makes for a valid, but tiny, complaint, so think of this as a run-of-the-mill Khaled album and that mill is still doing pretty awesome. © David Jeffries /TiVo
From
CD£14.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 16, 2019 | Epic - We The Best

From
CD£12.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2013 | Cash Money

Those who would accuse DJ Khaled of using an overly audacious album title for this seventh studio effort are quickly schooled once "Obama [Winning More Interlude]" hits the speakers. On the opening cut, real world audio of a national news broadcast finds America's 44th President entering an auditorium to the traditional "Hail to the Chief," but the music quickly switches to Khaled's platinum single "All I Do Is Win." In true Presidential style, Obama steps on the song's hook, asking the audience "How do you like my new entrance music?" and they go wild, because Khaled won the popular vote for the United States' hypeman-in-chief, plus he's the czar of mainstream hip-hop compilations that just happen to be filled with new tracks. Suffering from Success is more of the glorious same, as Khaled continues to win, win, win no matter what, filling hooky highlights like "No New Friends" with high power guest stars, which in this track's case, means the billion dollar trio of Drake, Lil Wayne, and Rick Ross. Canadian hitmaker Boi-1da helms the cut while big-time producers like J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League (creating well-funded mayhem with Future, Ace Hood, and Plies on "Blackball") and Timbaland (who also raps on the hard-hitting, mega-posse cut "You Don't Want These Problems") make sure the beats are what's poppin' in 2013, while folks like Meek Mill (clever and cool on "I Feel Like Pac/I Feel Like Biggie") and Mavado (offering dancehall vibes and sweet nothings to Nicki Minaj on the great "Give It All to Me") help round out a lightweight album that's otherwise big pimping and bottle service. Khaled does his usual cheerleading and gets some production credits himself, but the real trick he pulls off is inspiring all these artists to somehow save up all these high-grade club tracks and singles for the DJ's annual dispatch. Suffering from Success, once again. © David Jeffries /TiVo
From
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 23, 2015 | We The Best Music Group

From
CD£11.99

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 2, 2010 | eOne Music

The release of DJ Khaled’s fourth studio album was repeatedly delayed. With each pushed-back street date came a new track list, the biggest change coming when the Shyne feature “All My Life” fell off, and Young Jeezy went from centerpiece artist to two-track contributor. It’s a testament then to the DJ’s executive production power that the final product not only holds together, but solidly supports the album’s theme, offering a fist-pumping song cycle of triumph in the hood. With the five-star lineup of T-Pain, Ludacris, Snoop Dogg, and Rick Ross, “All I Do Is Win” is the gold medal track, with the Young Jeezy showcase “Put Your Hands Up” winning the silver. Bun B (“I got those yams like Thanksgiving dinner”) helps “Rockin’ All My Chains On” score the bronze, giving the track a slight edge over the hood reggae number “Killing Me,” which partners Busta Rhymes with Jamaican stars Buju Banton and Bounty Killer. Through intros and shout-outs, Khaled puts more of himself into this personal, story-telling album, and while this supposedly troubled effort seems complete and sound, for the most part, the closing “Rep My City” is the least satisfying number and is best thought of as a bonus track. Otherwise, the Terror Squad DJ’s ode to the victor is as satisfying as his other mega-star-studded albums, with the added benefit of being more cohesive and significantly more purposeful. © David Jeffries /TiVo
From
CD£12.99

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 29, 2021 | Epic - We The Best

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 29, 2021 | Epic - We The Best

"‘Thankful’ is a potent opener, before ‘Every Chance I Get’ supplies a real golden moment. ‘I Did It’ is a fiery team up..." © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 23, 2017 | Epic - We The Best

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 23, 2015 | We The Best Music Group

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 23, 2015 | We The Best Music Group