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Classical - Released January 17, 2011 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Diamant d'Opéra - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Classical - Released January 7, 2008 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or - 10 de Classica-Répertoire - Diamant d'Opéra
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Classical - Released January 7, 2008 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or - 10 de Classica-Répertoire - Diamant d'Opéra
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Classical - Released October 24, 2011 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 27, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released November 21, 2014 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released March 27, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
German soprano Diana Damrau, mostly a Mozart specialist, pushes her repertoire forward into the Italian 19th century with the awkwardly titled Fiamma del Belcanto. It might seem a recital that covers territory explored many times before, but in fact it has a lot to it, and is entirely suitable for a singer in mid-career. Damrau follows the moves of bel canto opera, the contrast of dramatic introduction, lyric cavatina, and big, vigorous cabaletta, through the 19th century, showing how they were still present in middle-period Verdi even as he began to ask questions the traditional forms could not answer, and even in the verismo operas of Puccini and Leoncavallo at the century's end, works for which Damrau does not quite have the vocal size. The entire program holds together well, though, and Damrau has both flair and a large variety of vocal textures that make most of the music convincing. Her characterizations are without exception distinctive and well thought out. A subsidiary theme is the German literary presence in Italian opera; three of the operatic stories on the album derive ultimately from Schiller. With crack accompaniment from the Orchestra Teatro Regio Torino under Gianandrea Noseda, this is a well-above-average operatic recital. © TiVo
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Opera - Released October 2, 2020 | Warner Classics

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Gaetano Donizetti drew inspiration from the Tudor queens and their sad fates to compose three operas that are considered some of the best works of bel canto: Anna Bolena, Maria Stuarda and Roberto Devereux. It is a great opportunity for a singer of Diana Damrau’s calibre who, like her colleague Beverly Sills has done in the past, uses the Italian composer’s sumptuous melodies to express the femininity and determination of these heroines who fell victim to either machismo or raison d'état.The final scenes presented in this album detail terrible demises, even though Donizetti and his librettists don’t strictly stick to historical truth. Poor Mary Stuart is beheaded by her cousin while Queen Elizabeth I and Anne Boleyn’s heads are chopped off by Henry VIII. Elizabeth is plunged into despair after the love of her life, Roberto, the Earl of Essex, is executed. Stricken with grief, she starts hallucinating and sees the crown of England bathed in blood and a man running around the palace wearing her own head. One hundred years after Donizetti, cinema has been able to explore these macabre situations even more vividly.Diana Damrau is particularly fond of Donizetti's characterisation of the three women. He gives them, she says, “the capacity to love, an enormous tenderness, an insatiable desire, vulnerability, a grandiose appearance, strength, conviction, vanity, pride, greed, ruthlessness, determination and harshness, a sense of responsibility and power, anger, rage, despair, helplessness, distress, sadness... and an underlying anxiety of death”. At the lectern we find Maestro Antonio Pappano, heading the Choir, Orchestra of the National Academy of Santa Cecilia in Rome and six vocal soloists. He has chiselled away at the accompaniments, elevating the tragedy of these three heart-breaking fates. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 31, 2020 | Warner Classics

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The late Mariss Jansons would never live to see the release of this album from Diana Damrau, in which he leads his Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra for a recital of Richard Strauss’ Vier letze Lieder. Recorded in the Herkulessaal (Hercules hall) of the Munich Residence and Hohenems in 2019, the album follows Damrau’s Lieder recital from 2011 which was also dedicated to the composer, under the direction of Christian Thielemann. Morgen was already re-recorded here, but the German soprano sang the Vier letzte Lieder once more under the direction of Mariss Jansons on November 8, 2019 during her very last concert on tour with the famous Bavarian ensemble at Carnegie Hall in New York, just twenty days before the composer passed away. Her gentle voice is much like that of her fellow performer Gundula Janowitz, bringing a radiant glow to this veritable farewell which was composed by an eighty-four-year-old Strauss as he contemplated life, gazing upon a Germany devastated by war. In addition to these orchestral pieces, the programme is devoted to a selection of some twenty Lieder from all eras, including Richard Strauss’ last composition, Malven (“Mauves”) which he composed in 1948 for singer Maria Jeritza, who jealously kept it to herself until it was finally released in 1985. Helmut Deutsch provides the ideal accompaniment on piano, listening, supporting and coordinating his playing with the German singer’s every word. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Lieder (German) - Released January 11, 2019 | Warner Classics

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By turns ecstatic and deeply depressed, as is the way with bipolar disorders, Hugo Wolf gave the world great and precious masterpieces in the genre of the lied with his great cycles, in particular Italienisches Liederbuch, for two voices, which represents the soul of the art. 46 lieder speak of love, focusing on the tangled feelings of man and woman across lovers' dialogues in ironic, gallant and impassioned tones. Written around words by Paul Heyse based on anonymous Tuscan poems, this collection is full of ballads, and in particular rispetti (compliments), folksy poems made up of two quatrains. The German translation seriously disfigures the light touch of the Italian original, especially as Hugo Wolf makes no attempt to "do Italian" in his compositions. “I assure you: a warm heart beats in the little chests of my youngest southern children, who, despite everything, cannot hide their German origins. Yes, their hearts beat in German, even though the sun shines in Italian", he told a friend. This Italian collection is made up of, as Stéphanie Goldet writes, "little love stories, moments of impatience or frustration, wishes and warnings, complaints and recriminations, demands and unconditional surrenders". Recorded in concert at the Hesse Philharmonic on 18 February 2018, this new recording ranks alongside other legendary records such as those by Schwarzkopf and Fischer-Dieskau; it will surely become a new reference point version. While it was reasonable to worry about Jonas Kaufmann's voice, we can hear that it has recovered all its strength and its thousand and one miraculous nuances. His partner, Diana Damrau, is radiant, with a song that brings together the many different emotions of a worried and sometimes mischievous young girl. But this dialogue would be nothing without the subtle and refined piano-playing of Helmut Deutsch, who has given these miniatures such an irresistible accompaniment. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 19, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Giacomo Meyerbeer, the French composer with an Italian-German name (adopted) and a Jewish background, was the toast of Paris for much of the middle 19th century, the musical collaborator of the great Eugène Scribe, and the single person in whose hands the genre of grand opera most clearly took shape. His music fell out of fashion among the late Romantics, was further depressed by Nazi bans, and has taken a while to come back into style. This fine anthology by German soprano Diana Damrau will help his cause. Plainly a labor of love, the album includes arias in German (one very early) and Italian as well as French, and among the latter from opéras comiques as well as grand opera. Some of the music sounds like Rossini, some like Wagner (whom Meyerbeer backed early in his career and was repaid by an anti-Semitic campaign), but most of it has a distinctive voice marked above all by splendid vocal writing. The music often hangs in the soprano's top register, and Damrau evokes how Meyerbeer's audiences must have felt on the knife's edge. There are examples of Meyerbeer's masterful orchestration, such as the flute duo from L'étoile du Nord, and the support from the Orchestra and Chorus of the National Opera of Lyon is top-notch, as is Erato's engineering. One gets the impression here that no expense was spared, rare enough in opera these days, and that the money was well spent. To hear it all tied together, sample "O beau pays de la Touraine", with Damrau excelling in both the haunting middle section and the fireworks of the finale. Brava! © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 10, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Mozart's first true operatic masterpiece, Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio), K. 384, cavorts around a Turkish harem with sexy slow numbers and brilliant arias for the principals. (Thomas Quasthoff fans note: he appears here in the purely speaking role -- the opera is a Singspiel, with spoken dialogue -- of the Pasha Selim.) This live recording from the Baden-Baden Festspielhaus, made in 2014, captures most of the opera's virtues. Soprano Diana Damrau in the role of the imprisoned Konstanze, is lively and equal to the challenges of the dangerous "Martern aller Arten" (Tortures of all kinds), and conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin keeps things moving and doesn't overload the Chamber Orchestra of Europe to the point where its energy is drained. The cast in general is well integrated into the overall conception, and if there's a weak point it's with the most celebrated member of the cast, tenor Rolando Villazón in the hero role of Belmonte, whose big tone is out of proportion with the music in general. The performance feints in the direction of historical performance with its fortepiano continuo, but can't compete in that regard with William Christie's historically informed version. It is on balance, however, a highly listenable Mozart in a live recording that puts the singers front and center, and brings them across well. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Booklet
Even though she is a celebrated operatic star with many brilliant coloratura roles in her repertoire, Diana Damrau is also a versatile performer in many other styles of vocal music, including concert arias, art songs, pop standards, and songs from musicals and movies. Because she embraces such a wide range of material with affection and technical ease, she is able to move gracefully between the worlds of Viennese operetta, Broadway show tunes, and music from Disney films, with only the slightest indications from her well-supported vocal production and crisp diction that she is much better known for her performances of Mozart, Donizetti, Verdi, and Strauss. This 2013 album brings together songs by many of Damrau's favorite composers of light music, including Franz Lehár, George Gershwin, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Stephen Sondheim, Leonard Bernstein, Harold Arlen, Richard Rodgers, and many more from the golden age of operetta, musical theater, and film musicals. The arrangements are well-suited to her powerful but subtly expressive voice, and David Charles Abell leads the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra with sensitivity to the program's changing moods. Erato's sound is big and full, which gives a certain uniformity to the ensemble's sound, though Damrau is always front and center in the mix. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 1, 2017 | Orfeo

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Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 1, 2005 | Haenssler Classic

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Classical - Released January 11, 2019 | Warner Classics

Booklet
Even the most serious composers had their light moments, and the Italienisches Liederbuch (in German, not Italian) was Hugo Wolf's. This set of 46 brief songs, most between one and two minutes long, is a true songbook and wasn't necessarily meant to be sung at a stretch. Presentations like the one here from soprano Diana Damrau and tenor Jonas Kaufmann are reasonable and even desirable; they shape the songs into a little narrative of love, conflict, makeup, and breakup, with dialogue between the two principals at each stage. The pair has often sung this cycle live, and some have felt that their stage business was overdone. There's little evidence of that on this recording, even though it was made live (in an appropriately sized and acoustically attractive recital hall at the Philharmonie in Essen). Indeed, the pair makes an appealing contrast, with Damrau's silvery, rather excitable soprano a fine foil to the honeyed tones of Kaufmann, here as sweet as ever. Both are attuned to the unique wit that percolates through this collection; sample Damrau in Mein Liebster hat zu Tische mich geladen, No. 25, which verges on musical comedy. Full of smiles from a composer not known for them. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Profil

Booklet
It's not for nothing that 1840 is thought of as Schumann's "year of the Lied": Dichterliebe, Frauen-Liebe und Leben , the two great Liederkreis – Heine and Eichendorff – as well as a number of other cycles came to be, plus this Myrten, which was written as a wedding gift for Clara Wieck. The 26 Lieder are in fact not connected by any organic link: rather, they are like a crown made of 26 flowers, all essentially different, all displaying the immense diversity of the composer's art in the domain of the Lied, running from a traveller's scrapbook – in the Orientalist texts of Goethe's West–östlicher Divan , Burns's Scotland or Venice with its gondolieri – to the more domestic and familial, by way of ambiguous moments evoking the Lotusblume (lotus flower) or the bucolic air of Germany. Soprano Diana Damrau and baritone Iván Paley, accompanied on the piano by Stephan Matthias Lademann, share the score, each choosing Lieder which best fit their voice – without any transposition; all the original tonalities are retained. Because, while the texts aren't necessarily organically connected to one another, the transition from one Lied to the next is strongly structured, and any modifications would break the tonal balance. Moreover, the alternation between male and female voices really puts the accent on the feminine-masculine aspect of the cycle, and it avoids any monotony. This is a very fine production indeed. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 21, 2014 | Warner Classics

Booklet
Diana Damrau gave her first performance as Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor at the Metropolitan Opera in October 2008, to much critical acclaim. This recording with the Munich Opera followed almost five years later, in July 2013, showing that she has staying power in the ultimate coloratura role. The Munich performance was conducted by Jesús López-Cobos, and Damrau was joined by an exceptional cast, which included Joseph Calleja as Edgardo, Ludovic Tézier as Enrico, and Nicolas Testé as Raimondo. The role of Lucia is one of the great bel canto roles, and Damrau's singing strikes a fine balance between the customary runs and embellishments characteristic of the style and the needs of the drama, which, in the case of Lucia, put her at the extreme poles of virtuosity and lyrical simplicity. High points of this recording are the arias, "Regnava nel silenzio," “Quando, rapito in estasi,” and the famous mad scene, "Spargi d'amaro pianto," which Damrau delivers with impressive control of line, crystalline ornamentation, and poignant expression. © TiVo