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Crooners - Released January 1, 2014 | SPECIAL MARKETS (SPM)

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Lounge - Released January 1, 2006 | Capitol Records

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 1, 1996 | Capitol Records

Like Capitol Collectors Series, this offers a 20-song overview of his Capitol years (the 1950s and early '60s), with a different track selection and an unfortunate absence of liner notes. It does have his biggest hits from the era, including "That's Amoré," "Memories Are Made of This, " "Innumerato, " and "Volare." ~ Richie Unterberger
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Lounge - Released January 1, 2006 | Capitol Records

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Ambient/New Age - Released December 20, 2017 | GBMUSIC

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Pop - Released April 1, 1967 | Legacy Recordings

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After putting five Dean Martin albums into release in 1966, Reprise may have felt it could afford a breather in 1967, and the label waited until spring to put out the first of its two Martin LPs for the year. Then, too, with Martin hosting a weekly television show and starring in three movies in 1966, the public may have been becoming sated with the entertainer; another reason for delaying a new album was that Martin's recent singles had not performed so well. After eight consecutive Top 40 hits between 1964 and 1966, his 45s began struggling to make the middle of the pop charts (although they continued to soar into the Top Ten of the easy listening charts). Mid-chart entries "Nobody's Baby Again," "(Open Up the Door) Let the Good Times In," and "Lay Some Happiness on Me," all of them arranged in the soft rock style of "Everybody Loves Somebody," didn't seem to justify tie-in LPs. All three, along with their B-sides, were rounded up for Happiness Is Dean Martin, which meant that more than half the album consisted of tracks that had been released previously on singles. The rest were in the familiar country-pop style Martin had been pursuing for the past few years, the most impressive being a recasting of the old Patsy Cline hit "She's Got You" as "He's Got You." But the declining sales curve of Martin's releases indicated it was time to find a new formula. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Lounge - Released January 1, 1989 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released March 12, 2018 | CTS Digital

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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released November 1, 1968 | Legacy Recordings

Dean Martin appears to have tired of maintaining his position as a major record-maker of the 1960s before his public got tired of him. With a weekly TV series to maintain and movies to make, the entertainer who had recorded frequently in the three years after his comeback with "Everybody Loves Somebody" in 1964 made his presence scarce thereafter. Reprise Records maintained a singles release schedule by issuing previously released LP tracks as singles in 1967-1968 ("In the Misty Moonlight," "You've Still Got a Place in My Heart"), while Martin avoided the recording studio for almost a year. When he did return, the resulting singles, "April Again" and "Not Enough Indians," only did well on the easy listening charts. Finally, after issuing two Greatest Hits sets, Reprise released Gentle on My Mind, Martin's first album of new material in 16 months. In the interim, the country-pop sound he had pioneered with producer Jimmy Bowen and arranger Ernie Freeman had taken hold with others, and he found himself covering the country crossover hits "Honey," "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," and "Gentle on My Mind." Of course, he did it superbly, but he was now chasing a trend instead of leading it. Bowen and Freeman kept the sound contemporary, and Martin was comfortable with the slightly more pop direction that country-pop had taken. But you couldn't help thinking that record-making had fallen far down his list of priorities. Meanwhile pent-up demand made Gentle on My Mind his highest-charting album in three years and his last LP of new recordings to go gold. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Pop - Released February 9, 2018 | Birdy Music

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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Lounge - Released January 1, 2006 | Capitol Records

Dean Martin's final sessions for Capitol Records before his switch to Frank Sinatra's Reprise label produced this curious LP, which sought to take advantage of the long-subsided craze for cha-cha music. It was Martin's second album under the baton of Nelson Riddle, who must also have been itching to join Reprise (as he did by 1963). In any case, both artists turned in competent but uninspired performances. Martin could sing as easily over charts filled with peppy horns and Latin percussion as he could over anything else, but the music did not especially move him, and the result was an odd coda to the Capitol years. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Lounge - Released January 1, 2013 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released July 26, 1966 | Legacy Recordings

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Dean Martin's career turnaround in 1964 came as a result of his hit recording of "Everybody Loves Somebody." It led to a higher profile on television and in the movies, which may have given the entertainer less time to make records. Nevertheless, the demand for them remained constant, and Reprise, his record label, satisfied that demand by mixing the new sides he managed to cut with previously issued ones. The Hit Sound of Dean Martin, like the previous year's Dean Martin Hits Again, had a title that implied it was a hits compilation. In fact, it was a combination of Martin's two most recent Top 40 pop and Top Five easy listening hits, "Come Running Back" and "A Million and One," with six newly recorded songs, the B-side of "A Million and One" (Lee Hazlewood's "Shades"), and two tracks, "Any Time" and "Ain't Gonna Try Anymore," that had been released originally on Country Style in 1963. ("Any Time," in fact, was making its third LP appearance, also having been used on Somewhere There's a Someone only four and a half months earlier.) The new songs, as usual arranged in a style that would define them as country music if they had been recorded in Nashville by a singer with more of a twang in his voice, were no great shakes. (The chart for "A Million and One" was a dead ringer for the Ray Charles version of "I Can't Stop Loving You.") And there was evidence that Reprise's blatant exploitation was starting to hurt Martin with record buyers. Previously, his albums had been reliable Top 20 entries and gold-sellers. The Hit Sound of Dean Martin only made the Top 40 and became his first LP since "Everybody Loves Somebody" hit not to go gold. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Pop - Released March 25, 2016 | Westmill

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Pop - Released June 15, 1983 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released August 7, 1969 | Legacy Recordings

By 1969, Dean Martin had scaled back his recording activities dramatically, devoting about two three-hour sessions per year on successive days in the spring to cut a single ten-track album. That's what he did on June 11 and 12 to make another album of Hollywood-style country-pop for release as I Take a Lot of Pride in What I Am. The title track was a recent country hit by Merle Haggard that Martin must have recognized as being in the style of Roger Miller's "King of the Road," a song he had covered, and "Houston," a song with which he had scored a hit. It was one of those jocular hobo numbers, and Martin handled it with his usual humor and nonchalance. Billy Mize's "Make It Rain," meanwhile, sounded like the songwriter had been listening carefully to the word-heavy style of John Hartford, whose "Gentle on My Mind" had been the title track of Martin's previous album. And Martin also cut "Little Green Apples," another country crossover hit written by Bobby Russell, who had written "Honey," also covered on Martin's last album. In other words, I Take a Lot of Pride in What I Am sounded a lot like its predecessor. Producer Jimmy Bowen was just trying to repeat previous successes, and the result was a bit tired. No wonder Martin was taking more interest in his golf game than in his recording activities. Unfortunately, his public was beginning to catch on to his disaffection and to respond in kind; the album marked a big drop-off in the singer's sales. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released May 30, 1996 | Capitol Records

Spanning two discs and 40 songs, The Capitol Years is the most thorough retrospective of Dean Martin's Capitol recordings. From "Memories Are Made of This" to "Return to Me" and "Volare," all of his major hits for the label are included, as are several album tracks, lesser-known singles, and a handful of rarities. The collection may have a few too many songs for some casual fans, but it's the only album that presents all the important Capitol tracks with care, thought, and first-class sound. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine