Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£12.99

Jazz - Released May 29, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

Forest of Feelings is keyboardist/guitarist/composer David Sancious' debut solo effort after leaving Bruce Springsteen's employ. He not only played keyboards on Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. and The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle and the title cut on Born to Run, but also arranged them. A musical polymath, Sancious never met a musical style he didn't like -- or couldn't master. Here he is fully under the sway of jazz-rock fusion and progressive rock. Produced by Billy Cobham, Forest of Feelings features Sancious on an army of keys -- Hammond B-3, clavinet, Moog, acoustic and Rhodes piano, etc. -- but also on guitar (on which he is just as proficient, if not better). His bandmates are drummer Ernest Carter and bassist Gerald Carboy. Cobham makes a guest timpani appearance on the opening stunner, "Suite Cassandra," a tune that takes inspiration in equal parts from Bach, Yes, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, and Return to Forever, but isn't derivative of or beholden to any of them. The playing here is as fluid as it is knotty. "Come on If You Feel Up to It... (And Get Down)" is screaming funky jazz-rock, with Sancious displaying his guitar heroics while the rhythm section breaks the tune's architecture all the way down before sending it soaring. Without at all being patronizing, Sancious reinvents "Dixie," thoroughly reharmonizing and recontextualizing it in a brief two-part suite that carries within its expansive reach all the historical and social darkness that greeted its melody in the civil rights era. The title track, with its legato phrasing and raging argpeggios on acoustic piano (before the wall of electronic keys kick in), reveals his command of jazz language as it meets rock head-on. "One Time," with its precise serpentine melody, contains a deep funk backbone, a jazzman's sense of syncopation, and rock & roll dynamics. The guitar solos are both meaty and spiraling. Closer "Further in the Forest of Feelings" has a rhythmic intensity that recalls Mahavishnu Orchestra on Inner Mounting Flame and the emotionally soulful expressiveness of Santana during the Caravanserai era. Forest of Feelings is an auspicious debut that delivers not only a mastery of various musical genres, but a holistic view of them. Just as the whole fusion thang was moving toward an increasingly irrelevant technician's language devoid of any cultural connection other than its own, this culturally advanced, spiritually open set hit the shelves. This music sounds as refreshing and life-affirming in the 21st century as it did in 1975. [The Esoteric reissue has been beautifully remastered by Paschal Byrne and contains new liner notes with Sancious quotes by Sid Smith and a bonus cut played on solo piano, entitled "Promise of Light."] ~ Thom Jurek
CD£12.99

Jazz - Released May 29, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

CD£12.99

Jazz - Released May 29, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

Some musicians are content to play one style of music exclusively, but that would never work for someone as eclectic and broad-minded as David Sancious. The keyboardist/guitarist/composer is the type of person who would listen to Chopin one minute and Parliament/Funkadelic the next, and someone that eclectic probably would have been bored to tears if he had not explored different styles of music. Recorded for Arista in 1979, Just As I Thought is a major departure from the album that came just before it, True Stories. While that 1978 recording favored vocal-oriented progressive rock, Just As I Thought is primarily an album of instrumental jazz fusion. There are a few non-jazz numbers that feature singer Khabir Ghanni, including the tender pop/rock ballad "Again" and the prog rock offering "Suite (For the End of an Age)." But most of the material is pure 1970s fusion, and Bruce Springsteen fans who still associate Sancious with the E Street Band should know that instrumentals like "Valley of the Shadow" and "Run" have little in common with the Boss but a lot in common with Weather Report, Chick Corea's Return to Forever, and John McLaughlin's Mahavishnu Orchestra. With one foot in jazz and the other in pop, rock, and funk, Just As I Thought isn't for bop purists but is recommended to anyone with a taste for 1970s fusion. ~ Alex Henderson
CD£8.99

Soul - Released March 10, 2020 | Not By Sight, Inc.

CD£12.99

Pop - Released September 22, 2003 | Epic