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Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Parlophone UK

For diehard fans, 1983-88 was neither Bowie’s most fundamental nor most passionate period. It would, however, be his most fruitful, climaxing with the hit Let’s Dance. Three years after the excellent Scary Monsters album, Bowie plunged body and soul into the MTV era with one of his greatest commercial successes, packed with funky pop and new wave disco hits that are hard to grow tired of. Produced by Nile Rodgers from Chic and released in April 1983, Let’s Dance even welcomed on board Stevie Ray Vaughan and includes a few hidden treasures, such as the glamorous cover of China Girl (co-written five years earlier with Iggy Pop for The Idiot) or the energetic opening track, Modern Love. The Thin White Duke croons like he’s never crooned before and his single Let’s Dance got people up on the dance floors all over the world. Once again, the star caught his fans off-guard and released an album that was completely different from his previous ones. Even if some people reproached the genius for indulging in a little commercial or even opportunistic pop soul success, Let’s Dance perfectly embodies its carefree title and ages rather well. Driven by his single Blue Jean and containing an improbable cover of God Only Knows by the Beach Boys, the album Tonight which was released in 1984 climbed its way to the top of the charts in the UK and even went platinum in the States. In April 1987, Bowie carried on down this path of muscular pop rock with Never Let Me Down… This boxset Loving The Alien (1983-1988) includes three remastered studio albums, live recordings from Serious Moonlight (Live'83) and Glass Spider (Live Montreal'87), as well as a compilation called Dance that brings together contemporary remixes of tracks from this period. One of the highlights is a new version of Never Let Me Down with brand-new production and instrumentation, supervised by Mario McNulty. The album is replayed by guitarist Reeves Gabriel, drummer Sterling Campbell, bassist Tim Lefebvre (who also features on Blackstar) and composer Nico Muhly. The idea came from Bowie himself who thought that the work from 1987 had been a "bitter disappointment". This 2018 version features Laurie Anderson's participation on Shining Star (Makin' My Love). As with the three previous volumes of the complete Bowie collection - Five Years (1969-1973), Who Can I Be Now? (1974-1976) and A New Career In A New Town (1977-1982) - this rich album Loving the Alien (1983-1988) also contains a new selection entitled Re:Call 4 as well as singles, remixes and some rare compositions such as Bowie’s contributions to the soundtracks of Labyrinth, The Falcon And The Snowman, Absolute Beginners and When the Wind Blows. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
£112.49
£97.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

The first in a series of career-spanning comprehensive box sets, Five Years 1969-1973 chronicles the beginning of David Bowie's legend by boxing all of his officially released music during those early years. This amounts to six studio albums -- 1969's David Bowie (aka Space Oddity); 1970's The Man Who Sold the World; 1971's Hunky Dory; 1972's The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust & the Spiders from Mars; Aladdin Sane, and Pin Ups (both from 1973); a pair of live albums (Ziggy Stardust: The Motion Picture Soundtrack and Live in Santa Monica '72, both released long after these five years) and a two-CD collection of non-LP tracks called Re:Call, plus Ken Scott's 2003 mix of Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust. That list suggests how "officially released" is a guideline that's easily bent. Live in Santa Monica '72 is a bootleg that became canonical in 1995, and the soundtrack to Ziggy Stardust didn't appear until 1983, but both are welcome because they either showcase the Spiders from Mars at their prime (Santa Monica) or at their end (Ziggy). Considering the number of edits, alternates, and B-sides Bowie released during this period, Re:Call is also a needed supplement, but it has some willful blind spots due to that "officially released" maxim: namely, any outtake released as a bonus on the Rykodisc reissues of the early '90s, including such major items as "Lightning Frightening," "Bombers," and "Sweet Head." Such absences are an irritant but not a major one because the box itself is quite handsome -- whether in its CD or LP incarnation, each record is packaged as a replica of its original release -- and the remastering is excellent, with Space Oddity, The Man Who Sold the World, Hunky Dory, and Pin Ups given upgrades to match the anniversary remasters of Ziggy and Aladdin Sane from the 2010s. The improved audio alone makes Five Years 1969-1973 a desirable box for serious Bowie fans, but the whole set does justice to one of the great creative runs in rock history. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£97.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

After Five Years (1969 – 1973) and Who Can I Be Now ? (1974 – 1976), to dive into the box set A New Career In A New Town (1977 – 1982), is to zoom in on David Bowie's Berlin period. In 1977, Ziggy moored up in the German city, then disfigured by a wall. With Diamond Dogs in 1974 and in particular Young Americans the following year, soul and funk were suffused with a rock’n’roll sound. But this Bowie was to be eclipsed by a colder, more cerebral, experimental Bowie. Always ready to re-invent himself, to follow trends (when he wasn't setting them himself...) and simply to question things, he flew to Berlin, where things were in motion. Alongside Brian Eno, formerly of Roxy Music, he wrote his famous Berlin trilogy, which opened with Low. On this bizarre record, everything begins with a weird baroque soul instrumental, with electronic textures (Speed of Light), then a balanced mix of songs and other instrumental tracks. Capable of delivering futurist soul (Sound And Vision), a sombre and mysterious symphony (Warszawa), new-wave minimalism that sounded like a Sci-Fi soundtrack (Art Decade) or disjointed, cubist rock (Breaking Glass), this was David Bowie revisiting his experiences with Krautrock from groups like Neu!, Can and Faust, playing with Kraftwerk's machines but remaining himself: a genially insane savant still ahead of his time.   Heroes, which stands out from the crowd, essentially follows the same recipe, but in warmer tones. In the still-immured German city, his music recalled the halcyon days of the raging punk movement that was thundering in his native England. Flanked by mad machines (once again piloted by Eno) and weird guitars (by  Robert Fripp, ex-member of King Crimson), Bowie channelled his experiments with electronic flavours (Neuköln) into compositions with more rounded melodies (Heroes, The Beauty And The Beast, Joe The Lion). Heroes is above all the cult album which would mark both new wave and the cold wave that followed…   Released in May 1979, Lodger closes the Berlin period in a more consensual (but less passionate) spirit. Recorded at Montreux and in New York by Tony Visconti, with Brian Eno still to hand, it features a Bowie who is having fun taking a look into world music, and in particular at the work of the group Talking Heads. This is hardly surprising, when we note that David Byrne's group was then working with Eno... Nevertheless, the ensemble remains startling and less homogeneous than the two previous records.   After this avant-garde trilogy, the British artist casts off some of his froideur, but not the madness, of his experiments with genre, with Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) which came out in 1980. Between self-assured modern funk (Fashion and its angular groove) and a re-visited new wave (Ashes To Ashes), he paints a new rainbow, as dense as ever, and still in step with the many currents of its time. A perfect marriage of the 70s and 80s, this brilliant neo-punk cabaret contains powerful compositions that are classic in content and daring in form. Forever in search of the unexpected, the Thin White Duke takes on board a post-Television song from Tom Verlaine (Kingdom Come), invites The Who's Pete Townshend to play on Because You're Young, and, on half of the tracks, offers Robert Fripp crazy, out-of-control guitar sequences.   Alongside remasters of Low, Heroes, Lodger, Stage and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), this box set offers Lodger remixed and co-produced by Visconti, Re:Call 3, a compilation of singles, B-sides and rarities including Heroes sung in German and French. © MZ/Qobuz
£97.99

Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Parlophone UK

Now is a reissue of a 1977 U.S.-only promotional release from David Bowie. The album features a selection of tracks from Heroes and Low and includes the promo's original artwork. ~ Rich Wilson
£112.49
£97.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Booklet
£95.99
£81.99

Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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After Five Years (1969 – 1973) and Who Can I Be Now ? (1974 – 1976), to dive into the box set A New Career In A New Town (1977 – 1982), is to zoom in on David Bowie's Berlin period. In 1977, Ziggy moored up in the German city, then disfigured by a wall. With Diamond Dogs in 1974 and in particular Young Americans the following year, soul and funk were suffused with a rock’n’roll sound. But this Bowie was to be eclipsed by a colder, more cerebral, experimental Bowie. Always ready to re-invent himself, to follow trends (when he wasn't setting them himself...) and simply to question things, he flew to Berlin, where things were in motion. Alongside Brian Eno, formerly of Roxy Music, he wrote his famous Berlin trilogy, which opened with Low. On this bizarre record, everything begins with a weird baroque soul instrumental, with electronic textures (Speed of Light), then a balanced mix of songs and other instrumental tracks. Capable of delivering futurist soul (Sound And Vision), a sombre and mysterious symphony (Warszawa), new-wave minimalism that sounded like a Sci-Fi soundtrack (Art Decade) or disjointed, cubist rock (Breaking Glass), this was David Bowie revisiting his experiences with Krautrock from groups like Neu!, Can and Faust, playing with Kraftwerk's machines but remaining himself: a genially insane savant still ahead of his time.   Heroes, which stands out from the crowd, essentially follows the same recipe, but in warmer tones. In the still-immured German city, his music recalled the halcyon days of the raging punk movement that was thundering in his native England. Flanked by mad machines (once again piloted by Eno) and weird guitars (by  Robert Fripp, ex-member of King Crimson), Bowie channelled his experiments with electronic flavours (Neuköln) into compositions with more rounded melodies (Heroes, The Beauty And The Beast, Joe The Lion). Heroes is above all the cult album which would mark both new wave and the cold wave that followed…   Released in May 1979, Lodger closes the Berlin period in a more consensual (but less passionate) spirit. Recorded at Montreux and in New York by Tony Visconti, with Brian Eno still to hand, it features a Bowie who is having fun taking a look into world music, and in particular at the work of the group Talking Heads. This is hardly surprising, when we note that David Byrne's group was then working with Eno... Nevertheless, the ensemble remains startling and less homogeneous than the two previous records.   After this avant-garde trilogy, the British artist casts off some of his froideur, but not the madness, of his experiments with genre, with Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) which came out in 1980. Between self-assured modern funk (Fashion and its angular groove) and a re-visited new wave (Ashes To Ashes), he paints a new rainbow, as dense as ever, and still in step with the many currents of its time. A perfect marriage of the 70s and 80s, this brilliant neo-punk cabaret contains powerful compositions that are classic in content and daring in form. Forever in search of the unexpected, the Thin White Duke takes on board a post-Television song from Tom Verlaine (Kingdom Come), invites The Who's Pete Townshend to play on Because You're Young, and, on half of the tracks, offers Robert Fripp crazy, out-of-control guitar sequences.   Alongside remasters of Low, Heroes, Lodger, Stage and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), this box set offers Lodger remixed and co-produced by Visconti, Re:Call 3, a compilation of singles, B-sides and rarities including Heroes sung in German and French. © MZ/Qobuz
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£81.99

Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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£83.99
£71.99

Pop - Released October 3, 2016 | Parlophone UK

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£45.99

Rock - Released September 4, 2006 | Parlophone UK

In 1989, not all major artists had their catalog available on CD, and one of the most notable absences was David Bowie. When the format was in its infancy, RCA had issued several of his classics, but those pressings were notoriously awful and were pulled from the market in 1985 when Bowie acquired the rights to the recordings. Sharp businessman that he is, he took the catalog to market, and after an intense bidding war, he chose to reissue his classic work through Rykodisc, an independent CD-only label that had earned acclaim for its work with Frank Zappa's catalog. Instead of dumping all the discs on the market at once, the titles were slowly rolled out, beginning with a series-encompassing Sound + Vision, a three-CD/one-CD-ROM box set released to great fanfare in the fall of 1989. At the time, box sets were all the rage, following the template of Bob Dylan's Biograph -- an exhaustive career overview that offered all the basics, peppered with some revealing rarities. Upon its release, Sound + Vision was reviewed as if it belonged to this tradition, when it really inverted the formula, offering a series, not career, overview by showcasing alternate versions and rarities, along with album tracks, with a few familiar hits tossed in here and there to provide context. This was a tantalizing way to begin a reissue campaign, and it did receive gushing reviews -- the CD-era publication Rock & Roll Disc breathlessly claimed "Suffice to say that the sound quality will give your ears an orgasm" -- but once the reissue series completed and once Ryko lost the rights to the catalog, Sound + Vision looked more like a curiosity, an artifact of its time, than a major statement. Much of the problem stems from its design -- it was intended to show off the sound quality, which was a marked improvement over the RCA discs, and to show the depth and breadth of rarities within the vaults. It was not a career-capper; it was a teaser. It was enticing upon its release, and some of it remains so. There's a clutch of early rarities that lead off the set -- the original demo of "Space Oddity," alternate single versions of "The Wild-Eyed Boy From Freecloud" and "The Prettiest Star" -- that are quite good, alternate takes on "John I'm Only Dancing" and "Rebel Rebel" that manage to be notably different without changing the feel, excellent outtakes from Diamond Dogs (a medley of "1984/Dodo"), Station to Station (a glittery, lush cover of Springsteen's "It's Hard to Be a Saint in the City"), and Young Americans (the superb "After Today," a disco-rock song that should have been on the album and is hands down the best rarity here). These suggested the great unearthed treasures that lay ahead, and they remain necessary additions to any serious Bowie collection, particularly because they never showed up on another disc. If they were placed in a better forum, they would function like the rarities on either Biograph or Eric Clapton's Crossroads -- rarities that helped fill in the details of an artist's story -- but since they're in a set that's intended to showcase what the Ryko series would do, not what Bowie had done, they're the main attraction instead of feeding into the greater narrative. And that narrative, while certainly capturing the sometimes bewildering twists and turns in Bowie's career, is an alternate-universe narrative, lacking defining songs, from "Starman" to "Golden Years," and presenting many familiar songs in odd, not particularly interesting variations (a live 1974 version of "Suffragette City," a German version of "Heroes," presented in a 1989 remix). Though it succeeds in conveying Bowie's ever-changing moods, it lacks the substance and sense of a great box set, which this surely could have been. Instead, it's an interesting artifact of the early days of CDs, right down to its overly elaborate packaging, and only those who want to relive that time, or need those rarities, will need this in their collection. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released October 3, 2016 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released November 14, 2014 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Nothing Has Changed is a bit of a cheeky title for a career retrospective from an artist who is known as a chameleon, and this triple-disc compilation has other tricks up its sleeve. Chief among these is sequencing the SuperDeluxe 59-track set in reverse chronological order, so it opens with the brand-new, jazz-inflected "Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)" and concludes with David Bowie's debut single, "Liza Jane." On paper, this seems a bit like a stunt, but in actuality it's a sly way to revisit and recontextualize a career that has been compiled many, many times before. Previously, there have been single discs, double discs, and triple-disc boxes, but the largest of these was Sound + Vision, a box released in 1989, and the most recent was 2002's The Best of Bowie, which featured slightly different track listings in different territories but generally stopped in the late '90s. The two-CD version of Nothing Has Changed resembles this 2002 set -- there are absences, notably "John, I'm Only Dancing," "Diamond Dogs," and "TVC15," but they're not noticed among the parade of standards -- but it's easily overshadowed by the triple-disc SuperDeluxe set. This version of Nothing Has Changed touches upon nearly every phrase of Bowie's career, bypassing Tin Machine but finding space for early pre-"Space Oddity" singles that often don't make Bowie's comps, and naturally it samples from his fine Y2K records, plus his 2013 comeback The Next Day. This expansiveness alone would be noteworthy, but when it's combined with the reverse sequencing the compilation forces listeners to reconsider an artist whose legacy seemed so set in stone it appropriately was enshrined in museums. Obvious high-water marks are undersold -- there's not as much Ziggy as usual, nor as much Berlin -- so other eras can also enter the canon, whether it's the assured maturity of the new millennium or the appealing juvenilia of the '60s. The end result is something unexpected: a compilation that makes us hear an artist we know well in a whole new way. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£20.49

Pop - Released November 11, 2016 | Rhino

Not the first posthumous compilation from David Bowie -- that would be the lavish box Who Can I Be Now? (1974-1976), which was planned prior to his January 10, 2016 death -- Legacy is nevertheless the first designed with his, well, legacy in mind. That much can be gleaned from the title of the compilation, but that's a bit of a feint since this set essentially repackages the simplest incarnation of a previous Bowie hits compilation, 2014's Nothing Has Changed. Legacy is available as a single and a double-disc, both carrying sequencings that mirror those on Nothing Has Changed (and both featuring a new mix of "Life on Mars?"). On the single disc, the first 12 songs are the same, then the back sequence is different, discarding "Absolute Beginners" and "Hallo Spaceboy" and concluding with "Where Are We Now?" and "Lazarus." Similarly, the double-disc has a nearly identical sequencing on its first disc -- "Ashes to Ashes" and "Fashion" are swapped -- with the differences arriving in the comp's final six songs, so Heathen's "Everyone Says Hi" is here, and this concludes with "Lazarus" and "I Can't Give Everything Away." In both cases, the Legacy sequencing is slightly better than that on Nothing Has Changed, since it winds up ending on the elegiac note that Bowie gave Blackstar. Still, it's splitting hairs: the 2016 and 2014 compilations are similar to each other, and they're also similar to the many Bowie comps that came before, and they're all just as likely to satisfy and pique interest. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£15.99

Pop - Released June 9, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Pop - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Originally released as part of the comprehensive 2018 box set Loving the Alien, Serious Moonlight (Live '83) is an audio release of the 1984 home video release Serious Moonlight, which itself aired earlier on the cable network HBO. In any incarnation, Serious Moonlight captures Bowie at the peak of his coolly calculated superstardom, streamlining his eccentricities so they are slick yet still a bit strange. It ain't rock & roll, it's entertainment, but that's also the charm of the record: it's big and glitzy, with Bowie acting justifiably proud of his grandiose moves but also performing with a sly, knowing wink. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released October 21, 2002 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 29, 2018 | Rhino

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After completing Low and Heroes, the first two albums of his Berlin trilogy, David Bowie spent most of 1978 touring the world. During this huge tour, baptised as Isolar II, he sang in front of a million people across 70 concerts in 12 countries! The star was free from his addiction problems which up until then had seen him go on stage only after having ingested astronomical quantities of cocaine… Recorded in April and May 1978 and released in September the same year, the live Stage album showed a Bowie in full transition, struggling with his glam beginnings, his soul music future and his present new wave. First published for the occasion of the Record Store Days in April 2018, Welcome To The Blackout (Live London'78) also captures this period. Recorded at Earls Court in London on June 30th and July 1st 1979 by Tony Visconti, this is a previously unreleased double live album offering more energetic versions than those on stage. The fascinating tracks from Low and Heroes lose some of their eccentricity on stage. And the “old hits” like Rebel Rebel and Ziggy Stardust gain in luxury what they lose in violence, even if on Suffragette City the singer does seem totally possessed. Finally, the lead guitarist Adrian Belew and rhythmic guitarist Carlos Alomar knit together stunning interventions to accompany the Thin White Duke. An unmissable document for Bowie fans. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

Artist

David Bowie in the magazine
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    Bringing back Bowie For diehard fans, 1983-88 was neither Bowie’s most fundamental nor most passionate period. It would, however, be his most fruitful, climaxing with the hit Let’s Dance.
  • Bowie, previously unreleased
    Bowie, previously unreleased After completing Low and Heroes, the first two albums of his Berlin trilogy, David Bowie spent most of 1978 touring the world.
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    The Qobuz Minute #25 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...