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Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released January 22, 2010 | Epic

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released November 11, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | Parlophone UK

Bowie first stepped onto the Glastonbury stage in 1971. “As of 1990 I got through the rest of the 20th century without having to do a big hits show. Yes, yes I know I did four or five hits on the later shows but I held out pretty well I thought…big, well-known songs will litter the field at Glastonbury this year. Well, with a couple of quirks of course”, David Bowie wrote at the time. In the year 2000, the Thin White Duke made an unforgettable impression on the UK’s largest music festival. Indeed, his set-list comprising of 21 tracks is a testament to the extent of his legacy. It includes the favourites: Starman, China Girl, Heroes, The Man Who Sold The World, Let’s Dance, Life On Mars?, Changes, Under Pressure, but also some quirkier gems: Stay, Golden Years, Wild Is The Wind, and the leading track from Station to Station (1975), the unusual, melancholic album that Lester Bangs considered to be his masterpiece.  Performing on stage with his long mane of hair, his ¾ Alexander McQueen coat and his XXL charisma, Bowie is on fire. He is joined by guitarist Earl Slick who replaced Mick Ronson when the Spiders From Mars broke up in 1974 and who at the time was the mastermind behind Diamond Dogs and David Live, Bowie’s first live recording. A true wonder to behold. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 18, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released June 29, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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After completing Low and Heroes, the first two albums of his Berlin trilogy, David Bowie spent most of 1978 touring the world. During this huge tour, baptised as Isolar II, he sang in front of a million people across 70 concerts in 12 countries! The star was free from his addiction problems which up until then had seen him go on stage only after having ingested astronomical quantities of cocaine… Recorded in April and May 1978 and released in September the same year, the live Stage album showed a Bowie in full transition, struggling with his glam beginnings, his soul music future and his present new wave. First published for the occasion of the Record Store Days in April 2018, Welcome To The Blackout (Live London'78) also captures this period. Recorded at Earls Court in London on June 30th and July 1st 1979 by Tony Visconti, this is a previously unreleased double live album offering more energetic versions than those on stage. The fascinating tracks from Low and Heroes lose some of their eccentricity on stage. And the “old hits” like Rebel Rebel and Ziggy Stardust gain in luxury what they lose in violence, even if on Suffragette City the singer does seem totally possessed. Finally, the lead guitarist Adrian Belew and rhythmic guitarist Carlos Alomar knit together stunning interventions to accompany the Thin White Duke. An unmissable document for Bowie fans. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 4, 2016 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

The first in a series of career-spanning comprehensive box sets, Five Years 1969-1973 chronicles the beginning of David Bowie's legend by boxing all of his officially released music during those early years. This amounts to six studio albums -- 1969's David Bowie (aka Space Oddity); 1970's The Man Who Sold the World; 1971's Hunky Dory; 1972's The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust & the Spiders from Mars; Aladdin Sane, and Pin Ups (both from 1973); a pair of live albums (Ziggy Stardust: The Motion Picture Soundtrack and Live in Santa Monica '72, both released long after these five years) and a two-CD collection of non-LP tracks called Re:Call, plus Ken Scott's 2003 mix of Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust. That list suggests how "officially released" is a guideline that's easily bent. Live in Santa Monica '72 is a bootleg that became canonical in 1995, and the soundtrack to Ziggy Stardust didn't appear until 1983, but both are welcome because they either showcase the Spiders from Mars at their prime (Santa Monica) or at their end (Ziggy). Considering the number of edits, alternates, and B-sides Bowie released during this period, Re:Call is also a needed supplement, but it has some willful blind spots due to that "officially released" maxim: namely, any outtake released as a bonus on the Rykodisc reissues of the early '90s, including such major items as "Lightning Frightening," "Bombers," and "Sweet Head." Such absences are an irritant but not a major one because the box itself is quite handsome -- whether in its CD or LP incarnation, each record is packaged as a replica of its original release -- and the remastering is excellent, with Space Oddity, The Man Who Sold the World, Hunky Dory, and Pin Ups given upgrades to match the anniversary remasters of Ziggy and Aladdin Sane from the 2010s. The improved audio alone makes Five Years 1969-1973 a desirable box for serious Bowie fans, but the whole set does justice to one of the great creative runs in rock history. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released October 27, 1997 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released June 11, 2002 | Iso - Columbia

Heathen marks a new beginning for David Bowie in some ways -- it's his first record since leaving Virgin, his first for Columbia Records, his first for his new label, ISO -- yet it's hardly a new musical direction. Like Hours, this finds Bowie sifting through the sounds of his past, completely at ease with his legacy, crafting a colorful, satisfying album that feels like a classic Bowie album. That's not to say that Heathen recalls any particular album or any era in specific, yet there's a deliberate attempt to recapture the atmosphere, the tone of his '70s work -- there's a reason that Bowie decided to reteam with Tony Visconti, the co-producer of some of his best records, for this album -- even if direct comparisons are hard to come by. Which is exactly what's so impressive about this album. Bowie and Visconti never shy away from electronic instrumentations or modern production -- if anything, they embrace it -- but it's woven into Bowie's sound subtly, never drawing attention to the drum loops, guitar synths, and washes of electronica. For that matter, guest spots by Dave Grohl and Pete Townshend (both on guitar) don't stand out either; they're merely added texture to this an album that's intricately layered, but always plays smoothly and alluringly. And, make no mistake, this is an alluring, welcoming, friendly album -- there are some moody moments, but Bowie takes Neil Young's eerie "I've Been Waiting for You" and Pixies' elusively brutal, creepy "Cactus" and turns them sweet, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, either. In the end, that's the key to Heathen -- the undercurrent of happiness, not in the lyrics, but in the making of music, a realization by Bowie and Visconti alike that they are perfect collaborators. Unlike their previous albums together, this doesn't boldly break new ground, but that's because, 22 years after their last collaboration, Scary Monsters, both Bowie and Visconti don't need to try as hard, so they just focus on the craft. The result is an understated, utterly satisfying record, his best since Scary Monsters, simply because he'd never sounded as assured and consistent since. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released November 1, 2015 | Parlophone UK

1. Outside bears the subtitle "The Diary of Nathan Adler or The Art-Ritual Murder of Baby Grace Blue. A Non-Linear Gothic Drama Hyper-Cycle." Alright, so it reeks of pretension. One belabors the point because Bowie at his best has always been pretentious, risque, creatively (if sometimes contrivedly) over the top. 1. Outside marks the first in a planned series of collaborations with multi-instrumentalist, producer, and conceptualist Brian Eno based on a Bowie short story. In this end-of-millennium setting, "art-crimes" and "concept muggings" merit their own police division funded by the "Arts Protectorate of London." Echoes of the Berlin "outsider" Bowie/Eno '70s trilogy of Low, Heroes, and Lodger reverberate throughout, including a return to the "cut-and-paste" lyric-assembly method then employed, only this time fed through a Mac rather than more labor-intensive paper-and-scissors tools. The thusly fragmented "narrative" follows the investigations of Detective Professor Adler into the murder and subsequent dismembered body parts exhibition of 14-year-old runaway Baby Grace Blue. In this cut-up, composite world, each character, including Adler, Baby Grace, mixed-race youth Leon Blank, septuagenarian Algeria Touchshriek, and art-terrorist Ramona A. Stone, reflects a different aspect of Bowie himself and is therefore a component of all the previous personas Bowie has enacted over the years. The music also randomly dices and displays many of the previous album settings such personas have populated. To complete the cube, Bowie then draws on musicians that form a kind of anagram band from his past. The closest "Ziggy" link comes courtesy of pianist Mike Garson, whose icy, tinkling jazz runs evoke many a spine-tingly moment from Aladdin Sane and Diamond Dogs. Besides Garson and Eno, other names familiar to those who follow the Bowie canon include guitarists Carlos Alomar (Station to Station through Scary Monsters) and Reeves Grabels (Tin Machine), and '90s collaborators such as drummer Sterling Campbell (Black Tie White Noise) and multi-instrumentalist Erdal Kizilcay (Buddha). Diamond Dogs, inspired by George Orwell's 1984, is another obvious precursor to 1. Outside's dissection of a post-apocalyptic, technological society in the name of Art. Bowie inflicts "in-character" spoken word segments as between-song segues, several of which evoke the Cockney campiness of such '60s period pieces as "Please Mr. Gravedigger" and "The Laughing Gnome" -- humor (intentional or not) that softens an otherwise bleak landscape. So, should you actually care about this dense, dark, difficult story and its generally unsympathetic characters? The effort required to adequately "process" 1. Outside pays off in a richly voyeuristic experience where Bowie once again reflects fringe culture onto the mainstream and forces us to consider that the differences are not so great. ~ Roch Parisien
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Pop - Released April 13, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Musical Theatre - Released October 21, 2016 | Columbia

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Rock - Released August 4, 2003 | Parlophone UK

Black Tie White Noise was the beginning of David Bowie's return from the wilderness of post-Let's Dance, the first indication that he was regaining his creative spark. To say as much suggests that it's a bit of a lost classic, when it's rather a sporadically intriguing transitional album, finding Bowie balancing the commercial dance-rock of Let's Dance with artier inclinations from his Berlin period, all the while trying to draw on the past by working with former Spider from Mars guitarist Mick Ronson, collaborating with Let's Dance producer Nile Rodgers, and even covering inspiration Scott Walker's "Nite Flights." On top of that, the record was inspired by his recent marriage to supermodel Iman -- the record is bookended with "The Wedding" and "The Wedding Song" -- and then tied up and presented as a sophisticated modern urban soul record, one that draws from uptown soul (including, rather bafflingly, a duet with Al B. Sure!) and state-of-the-art dance-club techno, while adding splashy touches like solos from avant jazz trumpeter Lester Bowie and a nod to modern alt-rock via a nifty cover of Morrissey's "I Know It's Gonna Happen Someday." That's a lot of stuff for one record to handle, so it shouldn't come as a great surprise that the album doesn't always work, but its stylish restlessness comes as a great relief, particularly when compared to the hermetically sealed previous solo Bowie record, 1987's Never Let Me Down. Black Tie White Noise displays greater musical ambition than any record he'd made since Scary Monsters, and while much of the record feels like unrealized ideas, there are songs where it all gels, like on the paranoid jumble of "Jump They Say," the aforementioned covers, the impassioned "You've Been Around," and the self-consciously smooth title track. Moments like these are the first in a long time to feel classically Bowie, and they point ahead toward the more interesting records he made in the second half of the '90s, but they are encased in a production that not only sounds dated years later, but sounded dated upon its release in the spring of 1993, two years into the thick of alternative rock. At that point, the club-centric, mainstream-courting Black Tie White Noise seemed as an anachronism during the guitar-heavy grunge-n-industrial glory days -- something Bowie tacitly acknowledged with its 1995 successor, Outside, which was every bit as gloomy as a Nine Inch Nails record -- but separated from the vagaries of fashion, it's an interesting first step in Bowie's creative revival. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 17, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 16, 2003 | Iso - Columbia

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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David Bowie in the magazine
  • Glastonbowie 2000
    Glastonbowie 2000 The live Glastonbury 2000 performance is finally available in Hi-Res 24-Bit!
  • Bringing back Bowie
    Bringing back Bowie For diehard fans, 1983-88 was neither Bowie’s most fundamental nor most passionate period. It would, however, be his most fruitful, climaxing with the hit Let’s Dance.
  • Bowie, previously unreleased
    Bowie, previously unreleased After completing Low and Heroes, the first two albums of his Berlin trilogy, David Bowie spent most of 1978 touring the world.
  • The Qobuz Studio: Episode #7
    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #7 This week featuring albums from Breakbot, Rokia Traore, Dion, Bill Frisell, Helene Grimaud...
  • The 1000 lives of Bowie
    The 1000 lives of Bowie Major Tom also known as Ziggy Stardust also known as Aladdin Sane also known as Thin White Duke also known as...
  • David Bowie has died.
    David Bowie has died. A unique star, singular and brilliant, forever etched into the history of rock and pop, was taken from the world by cancer, just a few hours after celebrating his 69th birthday and releasing what w...
  • The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5
    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5 This week featuring albums from David Bowie, Kevin Gates, Mariss Jansons & Wiener Philharmoniker, Pop ETC, John Moreland, and a retrospective on Mike Oldfield.
  • The Qobuz Minute #25
    The Qobuz Minute #25 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...