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£97.99

Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Parlophone UK

For diehard fans, 1983-88 was neither Bowie’s most fundamental nor most passionate period. It would, however, be his most fruitful, climaxing with the hit Let’s Dance. Three years after the excellent Scary Monsters album, Bowie plunged body and soul into the MTV era with one of his greatest commercial successes, packed with funky pop and new wave disco hits that are hard to grow tired of. Produced by Nile Rodgers from Chic and released in April 1983, Let’s Dance even welcomed on board Stevie Ray Vaughan and includes a few hidden treasures, such as the glamorous cover of China Girl (co-written five years earlier with Iggy Pop for The Idiot) or the energetic opening track, Modern Love. The Thin White Duke croons like he’s never crooned before and his single Let’s Dance got people up on the dance floors all over the world. Once again, the star caught his fans off-guard and released an album that was completely different from his previous ones. Even if some people reproached the genius for indulging in a little commercial or even opportunistic pop soul success, Let’s Dance perfectly embodies its carefree title and ages rather well. Driven by his single Blue Jean and containing an improbable cover of God Only Knows by the Beach Boys, the album Tonight which was released in 1984 climbed its way to the top of the charts in the UK and even went platinum in the States. In April 1987, Bowie carried on down this path of muscular pop rock with Never Let Me Down… This boxset Loving The Alien (1983-1988) includes three remastered studio albums, live recordings from Serious Moonlight (Live'83) and Glass Spider (Live Montreal'87), as well as a compilation called Dance that brings together contemporary remixes of tracks from this period. One of the highlights is a new version of Never Let Me Down with brand-new production and instrumentation, supervised by Mario McNulty. The album is replayed by guitarist Reeves Gabriel, drummer Sterling Campbell, bassist Tim Lefebvre (who also features on Blackstar) and composer Nico Muhly. The idea came from Bowie himself who thought that the work from 1987 had been a "bitter disappointment". This 2018 version features Laurie Anderson's participation on Shining Star (Makin' My Love). As with the three previous volumes of the complete Bowie collection - Five Years (1969-1973), Who Can I Be Now? (1974-1976) and A New Career In A New Town (1977-1982) - this rich album Loving the Alien (1983-1988) also contains a new selection entitled Re:Call 4 as well as singles, remixes and some rare compositions such as Bowie’s contributions to the soundtracks of Labyrinth, The Falcon And The Snowman, Absolute Beginners and When the Wind Blows. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
£95.99
£81.99

Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
After Five Years (1969 – 1973) and Who Can I Be Now ? (1974 – 1976), to dive into the box set A New Career In A New Town (1977 – 1982), is to zoom in on David Bowie's Berlin period. In 1977, Ziggy moored up in the German city, then disfigured by a wall. With Diamond Dogs in 1974 and in particular Young Americans the following year, soul and funk were suffused with a rock’n’roll sound. But this Bowie was to be eclipsed by a colder, more cerebral, experimental Bowie. Always ready to re-invent himself, to follow trends (when he wasn't setting them himself...) and simply to question things, he flew to Berlin, where things were in motion. Alongside Brian Eno, formerly of Roxy Music, he wrote his famous Berlin trilogy, which opened with Low. On this bizarre record, everything begins with a weird baroque soul instrumental, with electronic textures (Speed of Light), then a balanced mix of songs and other instrumental tracks. Capable of delivering futurist soul (Sound And Vision), a sombre and mysterious symphony (Warszawa), new-wave minimalism that sounded like a Sci-Fi soundtrack (Art Decade) or disjointed, cubist rock (Breaking Glass), this was David Bowie revisiting his experiences with Krautrock from groups like Neu!, Can and Faust, playing with Kraftwerk's machines but remaining himself: a genially insane savant still ahead of his time.   Heroes, which stands out from the crowd, essentially follows the same recipe, but in warmer tones. In the still-immured German city, his music recalled the halcyon days of the raging punk movement that was thundering in his native England. Flanked by mad machines (once again piloted by Eno) and weird guitars (by  Robert Fripp, ex-member of King Crimson), Bowie channelled his experiments with electronic flavours (Neuköln) into compositions with more rounded melodies (Heroes, The Beauty And The Beast, Joe The Lion). Heroes is above all the cult album which would mark both new wave and the cold wave that followed…   Released in May 1979, Lodger closes the Berlin period in a more consensual (but less passionate) spirit. Recorded at Montreux and in New York by Tony Visconti, with Brian Eno still to hand, it features a Bowie who is having fun taking a look into world music, and in particular at the work of the group Talking Heads. This is hardly surprising, when we note that David Byrne's group was then working with Eno... Nevertheless, the ensemble remains startling and less homogeneous than the two previous records.   After this avant-garde trilogy, the British artist casts off some of his froideur, but not the madness, of his experiments with genre, with Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) which came out in 1980. Between self-assured modern funk (Fashion and its angular groove) and a re-visited new wave (Ashes To Ashes), he paints a new rainbow, as dense as ever, and still in step with the many currents of its time. A perfect marriage of the 70s and 80s, this brilliant neo-punk cabaret contains powerful compositions that are classic in content and daring in form. Forever in search of the unexpected, the Thin White Duke takes on board a post-Television song from Tom Verlaine (Kingdom Come), invites The Who's Pete Townshend to play on Because You're Young, and, on half of the tracks, offers Robert Fripp crazy, out-of-control guitar sequences.   Alongside remasters of Low, Heroes, Lodger, Stage and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), this box set offers Lodger remixed and co-produced by Visconti, Re:Call 3, a compilation of singles, B-sides and rarities including Heroes sung in German and French. © MZ/Qobuz
£112.49
£97.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Booklet
£97.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

The first in a series of career-spanning comprehensive box sets, Five Years 1969-1973 chronicles the beginning of David Bowie's legend by boxing all of his officially released music during those early years. This amounts to six studio albums -- 1969's David Bowie (aka Space Oddity); 1970's The Man Who Sold the World; 1971's Hunky Dory; 1972's The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust & the Spiders from Mars; Aladdin Sane, and Pin Ups (both from 1973); a pair of live albums (Ziggy Stardust: The Motion Picture Soundtrack and Live in Santa Monica '72, both released long after these five years) and a two-CD collection of non-LP tracks called Re:Call, plus Ken Scott's 2003 mix of Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust. That list suggests how "officially released" is a guideline that's easily bent. Live in Santa Monica '72 is a bootleg that became canonical in 1995, and the soundtrack to Ziggy Stardust didn't appear until 1983, but both are welcome because they either showcase the Spiders from Mars at their prime (Santa Monica) or at their end (Ziggy). Considering the number of edits, alternates, and B-sides Bowie released during this period, Re:Call is also a needed supplement, but it has some willful blind spots due to that "officially released" maxim: namely, any outtake released as a bonus on the Rykodisc reissues of the early '90s, including such major items as "Lightning Frightening," "Bombers," and "Sweet Head." Such absences are an irritant but not a major one because the box itself is quite handsome -- whether in its CD or LP incarnation, each record is packaged as a replica of its original release -- and the remastering is excellent, with Space Oddity, The Man Who Sold the World, Hunky Dory, and Pin Ups given upgrades to match the anniversary remasters of Ziggy and Aladdin Sane from the 2010s. The improved audio alone makes Five Years 1969-1973 a desirable box for serious Bowie fans, but the whole set does justice to one of the great creative runs in rock history. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£97.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

After Five Years (1969 – 1973) and Who Can I Be Now ? (1974 – 1976), to dive into the box set A New Career In A New Town (1977 – 1982), is to zoom in on David Bowie's Berlin period. In 1977, Ziggy moored up in the German city, then disfigured by a wall. With Diamond Dogs in 1974 and in particular Young Americans the following year, soul and funk were suffused with a rock’n’roll sound. But this Bowie was to be eclipsed by a colder, more cerebral, experimental Bowie. Always ready to re-invent himself, to follow trends (when he wasn't setting them himself...) and simply to question things, he flew to Berlin, where things were in motion. Alongside Brian Eno, formerly of Roxy Music, he wrote his famous Berlin trilogy, which opened with Low. On this bizarre record, everything begins with a weird baroque soul instrumental, with electronic textures (Speed of Light), then a balanced mix of songs and other instrumental tracks. Capable of delivering futurist soul (Sound And Vision), a sombre and mysterious symphony (Warszawa), new-wave minimalism that sounded like a Sci-Fi soundtrack (Art Decade) or disjointed, cubist rock (Breaking Glass), this was David Bowie revisiting his experiences with Krautrock from groups like Neu!, Can and Faust, playing with Kraftwerk's machines but remaining himself: a genially insane savant still ahead of his time.   Heroes, which stands out from the crowd, essentially follows the same recipe, but in warmer tones. In the still-immured German city, his music recalled the halcyon days of the raging punk movement that was thundering in his native England. Flanked by mad machines (once again piloted by Eno) and weird guitars (by  Robert Fripp, ex-member of King Crimson), Bowie channelled his experiments with electronic flavours (Neuköln) into compositions with more rounded melodies (Heroes, The Beauty And The Beast, Joe The Lion). Heroes is above all the cult album which would mark both new wave and the cold wave that followed…   Released in May 1979, Lodger closes the Berlin period in a more consensual (but less passionate) spirit. Recorded at Montreux and in New York by Tony Visconti, with Brian Eno still to hand, it features a Bowie who is having fun taking a look into world music, and in particular at the work of the group Talking Heads. This is hardly surprising, when we note that David Byrne's group was then working with Eno... Nevertheless, the ensemble remains startling and less homogeneous than the two previous records.   After this avant-garde trilogy, the British artist casts off some of his froideur, but not the madness, of his experiments with genre, with Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) which came out in 1980. Between self-assured modern funk (Fashion and its angular groove) and a re-visited new wave (Ashes To Ashes), he paints a new rainbow, as dense as ever, and still in step with the many currents of its time. A perfect marriage of the 70s and 80s, this brilliant neo-punk cabaret contains powerful compositions that are classic in content and daring in form. Forever in search of the unexpected, the Thin White Duke takes on board a post-Television song from Tom Verlaine (Kingdom Come), invites The Who's Pete Townshend to play on Because You're Young, and, on half of the tracks, offers Robert Fripp crazy, out-of-control guitar sequences.   Alongside remasters of Low, Heroes, Lodger, Stage and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), this box set offers Lodger remixed and co-produced by Visconti, Re:Call 3, a compilation of singles, B-sides and rarities including Heroes sung in German and French. © MZ/Qobuz
£97.99

Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Parlophone UK

Now is a reissue of a 1977 U.S.-only promotional release from David Bowie. The album features a selection of tracks from Heroes and Low and includes the promo's original artwork. ~ Rich Wilson
£83.99
£71.99

Pop - Released October 3, 2016 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
£112.49
£97.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Booklet
£95.99
£81.99

Rock - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res

Artist

David Bowie in the magazine
  • Glastonbowie 2000
    Glastonbowie 2000 The live Glastonbury 2000 performance is finally available in Hi-Res 24-Bit!
  • Bringing back Bowie
    Bringing back Bowie For diehard fans, 1983-88 was neither Bowie’s most fundamental nor most passionate period. It would, however, be his most fruitful, climaxing with the hit Let’s Dance.
  • Bowie, previously unreleased
    Bowie, previously unreleased After completing Low and Heroes, the first two albums of his Berlin trilogy, David Bowie spent most of 1978 touring the world.
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    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #7 This week featuring albums from Breakbot, Rokia Traore, Dion, Bill Frisell, Helene Grimaud...
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  • David Bowie has died.
    David Bowie has died. A unique star, singular and brilliant, forever etched into the history of rock and pop, was taken from the world by cancer, just a few hours after celebrating his 69th birthday and releasing what w...
  • The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5
    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #5 This week featuring albums from David Bowie, Kevin Gates, Mariss Jansons & Wiener Philharmoniker, Pop ETC, John Moreland, and a retrospective on Mike Oldfield.
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    The Qobuz Minute #25 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...