Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£12.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 8, 2019 | Neighbourhood

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
That we're only getting Dave's debut album in 2019 tells us a lot about the artist himself. With a Drake co-sign, a number one-charting hit, and a string of viral singles dating back to 2016, the London-born rapper had every opportunity to secure the bag, whip up a half-baked debut and guarantee himself the big-label sophomore. Yet Dave wanted it to get it right the first time. Distilling his life experiences into a concept, his debut album PSYCHODRAMA comes fully formed, a nuanced project imitating the form of therapy his brother experienced in prison. With snippets from his therapist dividing the album into three self-described "acts" -- Environment, Relationships, and Social Compass -- the project sees Dave re-enacting lived experiences and mind states in self-reflection. The result is a thoroughly compelling self-examination; taking us track by track through attitudes, occurrences, and locations, Dave paints a detailed self-portrait, wrapped in strands of both past and present. Much like the late-teen Nas on Illmatic, Dave's pen works beyond his years. PSYCHODRAMA holds visions of broken relationships, poverty, and deep-set depression, yet they're never inflated; through projecting his own experiences, Dave reflects the conditions of his South London home with frankness and personal grievance. Whether it be the rallying cry for racial identity on "Black," generational voicing of "Environment," or 11-minute domestic abuse narrative of "Lesley," Dave's words consistently blur the line between personal and universal, addressing significant issues aptly while giving greater insight into the artist himself. Yet far from just blunt reportage, PSYCHODRAMA's lyrics are steeped in wordplay. Lines like "Now he's cuttin' through bricks like the 118" manifest triple entendres with ease, while others like "I've got a baby, a crossbow like Cupid" employ sly references to Dave's home city. As well as adding authorial color, this wordplay gives the album's blunter moments a greater poignancy: "I used to cry about my dad until my f*cking eyes burnt" cuts sharply through the riffing of "Psycho," while "Environment" deconstructs public perception with "You see this industry where everybody came up / I see a bag of weird rappers". That's not to mention late gems "Lesley" and "Drama," skeletal narrative outpourings that tear away the wittiness to deliver heart-wrenching stories of distraught families and isolation. With the significance of the narratives being woven, it's essential that the album's production doesn't attempt to take the spotlight for itself. Luckily, PSYCHODRAMA's production is thoroughly complementary, adding texture and resonance to Dave's words while ensuring his voice remains center stage. The tools of this are organic and instrumental: "Purple Heart" and "Lesley" reflect isolation and grief through strings, while vocal samples put a haunting strand through "Screwface Capital" and "Black." The primary force at work here, though, is Dave's piano. Putting tool to tone, he morphs the piano to suit his needs, reflecting everything from joy to aggression through note placement and complementary electronics. The result is an album where sonics reinforce moods, allowing Dave to express a wealth of emotions in a measured, complex approach. Packing dense lyricism, poignant introspection, and resonant production into a neatly compiled concept, PSYCHODRAMA has all the makings of a generational classic. The product of a MC beyond his years, Dave's debut album stands firmly among the Godfathers and Made in the Manors as one of the finest British rap albums of the decade. © David Crone /TiVo
From
CD£11.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released July 22, 2021 | Neighbourhood

PSYCHODRAMA, Dave's visionary debut album, was empowered by its fiercely local perspective. The stains and triumphs of London living trickled through the record's very fibers, manifesting in direct homage to "Streatham," sly references to Brixton and Bow, and the localized minutiae of "Lesley." Yet with his second album, We're All Alone in This Together, the scope has opened somewhat. The Dave of 2021 is rallying against Middle Eastern refugee crises and deepening his Nigerian ties -- a rapper with his feet planted in London, but with a gaze stretching worldwide. With his acute pen, Dave folds international concerns into the London diaspora: "Three Rivers" poignantly examines three eras of British immigration, "Lazarus" pings between London and Lagos, and "Heart Attack" contextualizes cyclical violence with its "Somali dad ran away from a war, now his son's in a war." PSYCHODRAMA's localization is far from gone -- "Verdansk" kicks the album off with Brick Lane wisecracks and a "three-car convoy in Sutton" -- but the project, like its cover, feels refreshingly open, floating contemplatively amid global contexts and local tales. As with all of Dave's works, WAAITT is defined by its statement pieces. The album's seven-plus-minute monoliths employ his talents to different ends: "In the Fire" is an awe-striking Avengers Assemble of U.K. rap, "Both Sides of a Smile" folds conflicted romances into James Blake's harmonies, and "Heart Attack" provides another meditative masterwork. They are brought to fulmination, like the "Question Time"s before them, by the rapper's ageless insight and evocative lyricism. "In the Fire" employs a reference to Jakub Błaszczykowski as not just a triple entendre but a brutal allegory for losing a parent to immigration services. Among the set's shorter cuts are a wealth of staples: the minimalist strut of "Titanium" and "Funky Friday" finds a solid counterpart in "Verdansk" and "Clash," while PSYCHODRAMA's sublime opener/closer combo is matched by "We're All Alone" and "Survivor's Guilt." Dave even manages to succeed where Fredo's "Hickory Dickory Dock" so publicly fell, nailing nursery-rhyme trappings on "Twenty to One." The only dip in excellence is with the airier "Law of Attraction" and "System," which feel out of sync with the album's core in a way that "Purple Heart" and "Location" didn't. Adrift on the open sea, Dave makes a potent second statement. His first steps outside of PSYCHODRAMA's concrete sphere of influence continue to cement his generational talent. © David Crone /TiVo
From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released February 12, 2002 | Sony Music Media

From
CD£23.49

French Music - Released November 21, 2011 | SME Strategic Marketing Group

From
CD£14.49

French Music - Released July 7, 1997 | Versailles

From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released July 22, 1997 | Sony Music Media

From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released April 20, 1977 | Versailles

From
CD£2.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released April 10, 2021 | Neighbourhood

From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released January 15, 1975 | Versailles

From
CD£1.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 4, 2018 | Neighbourhood

From
CD£1.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released July 8, 2021 | Neighbourhood

From
CD£9.99

French Music - Released September 13, 2019 | GM Collection

From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released August 16, 1999 | Sony Music Media

From
CD£1.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 7, 2019 | Neighbourhood

From
CD£13.99

Pop - Released April 13, 2004 | EastWest France

From
CD£7.29

World - Released June 5, 2015 | Zouk Ô Pluriel

From
CD£7.99

Pop - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone (France)

From
CD£18.49

Pop - Released April 2, 2007 | Warner (France)

From
CD£12.99

French Music - Released July 22, 1992 | Columbia

From
CD£11.29

World - Released June 15, 2019 | Zouk Ô Pluriel